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Thread: Is it really that dangerous to machine Corian?

  1. #1
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    Is it really that dangerous to machine Corian?

    I've seen some posts that Corian dust is extremely hazardous and one should have a fresh air supplied respirator when machining it. I want to cut and route a small piece of Corian. If I use a full face respirator will that be good enough?

  2. #2
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    I hope so Brian. I turned a couple pens for a former manager of mine. He was a West Point graduate and carried those 2 pens in to Iraq and Afghanistan when he got recalled. The corian matched his desert camos and I used a gun metal finish pen which didn't glare so as not to make him a target.
    Ken

  3. #3
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    Search Google "working with Corian safety" and you will find a DuPont paper.

    Basically you will want to wear a respirator for safety but also because the fine dust is a real nuisance.

    There is a lot of research yet to be done on how easily dust gets in the lungs and what damage it causes.
    I'm a Creeker, yes I m.
    I fries my bacon in a wooden pan.

  4. #4
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    It creates dust like working with MDF.


    John

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    I've seen some posts that Corian dust is extremely hazardous and one should have a fresh air supplied respirator when machining it. I want to cut and route a small piece of Corian. If I use a full face respirator will that be good enough?
    Corian can release methyl methacrylate and/or butyl acrylate when being machined. Regular organic compound respirator cartridges with NIOSH particulate filters should be fine. A full-face downdraft respirator really wouldn't be necessary for one small project.

  6. #6
    The piddly amount of methyl methacrylate that may be released is not the issue, it is dust and lots of it.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bill tindall View Post
    The piddly amount of methyl methacrylate that may be released is not the issue, it is dust and lots of it.
    If you're sanding, I guess. I found routing it the chips stick to everything. I did some routing in the kitchen - had to do it in-place and you want to talk about a mess . It cleaned up fine though and with dust collection on the sanders there was little or no fine dust beyond the immediate area.
    mess.JPG

  8. #8
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    I take the same precautions when machining Corian as I do with any lumber or sheet stock.
    .

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