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Thread: Oops! Wood is too small for the chuck.

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    879
    A chuck insert ring, like Michael describes would help. I've made a couple from cutting boards and UHMW scraps. If you are interested, PM me and I'll give some details.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    lufkin tx
    Posts
    2,011
    Brian, try the corners thing--I've done it a lot. Cost is zero to try one.

  3. #18
    Here's a solution for you to consider without buying or making anything. Your 50 mm. jaws will go down to almost 1 3/4 in, so why don't you turn a shoulder a little bigger on your square stock ?? There will be small flats but they will not interfere with the jaws gripping the turned portion. I have done this many times without any failures. Give it a try, think you will be happy.

    Clint Merrill

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Texas Hill Country, USA
    Posts
    1,967
    I always thought that 8/4 stock was 2" thick and would fit into the 50mm jaws just fine. I am sure you measured the wood to get 1.75" and are not just guessing at it though.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    815
    Grabbing the corners works perfectly, believe me.

    Leo's shop-made custom jaw suggestion is a technique every woodturner needs to develop. Those can be made in an infinite number of sizes and shapes, and they can be reused (and re-shaped) for future projects.
    Last edited by Russell Neyman; 03-26-2015 at 7:32 PM.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    6,198
    Yes, Robert, the 1-3/4" is a real measurement.

    My first try at grabbing the corners failed. Probably because of the length of the piece - 8" including the gripped portion. I'll try that again, and one with rounded shoulders on a 6" piece.

    …and the new jaws are somewhere in transit, due about Tuesday or Wednesday.
    Veni Vidi Vendi Vente! I came, I saw, I bought a large coffee!

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    327
    I have something like 10 sets of jaws for my Nova chucks (a G3 and a Midi). You can never have enough jaw sets. My saying originally was "I never have the right jaw set".

    Now I do not have enough Nova chucks ...

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Redding, CA (That's in superior Calif.)
    Posts
    810
    What I have done with things as small as birdhouse ornaments is to:
    1. Turn the stock into round.
    2. If part of the inside is to be hollowed, drill a hole the size of a dowel. Tight fit is good.
    3. Cut a dowel to fit into the stock hole
    4. Put the other end in a collet chuck or spigot jaws.

    That's the way I do it to avoid end grain gluing and still be able to use the entire length of the stock.
    You could also use a waste piece with a tenon to fit into the stock hole.

    I'm sure there are many ways to accomplish your goal. I try to figure out a way to get by with what I have. Then I go and buy a new tool.
    Project Salvager

    The key to the gateway of wisdom is to know that you don't know.______Stan Smith

  9. #24
    Links aren't opening for me so I'm not sure if this is what others are already talking about but I make bushings to fit if I have many pieces to make like you describe. Turn one end of your blank round between centers. The dimension can be a little rough but once it is completely round turn a ring that will slide over the blank and fit in the chuck jaws. Cut a slot through the ring so it can tighten up on the blank when you tighten the lathe jaws on the ring.


    When I am cutting multiple pieces like this it is very fast since the same bushing ring is used over and over.

    Hu

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