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Thread: Jointer head speed/ feed speed

  1. #16
    My 16" euro jointer came from the factory with the 4.8" dia. cutterhead spinning @ 5500 RPM with a 3600 RPM motor. With the U.S. motor on it now, the cutterhead is spinning @ 5270 RPM which is more than fast enough for me.

    The two things that make the higher speed safe is the modern wedge gib that holds the knife in place, and the dynamically balanced cutterhead assembly.

    With the older cutterhead design and babbitt bearings, I would be nervous about speeds higher than the original design.

    One consideration is adapting a modern cutterhead with more knives, or even one of the "shelix" heads. Some old machines are more easily converted to modern bearings, and I would research that option if upgrading the cutterhead.

    Lots of used modern cutterheads laying around after straight knife machines were upgraded to "shelix" heads. Might be cost effective to adapt such a cutterhead to your jointer if the machine shop work isn't too involved.

    In my use, jointer production speed is not a big issue. I have a power feeder mounted to my jointer, but hardly ever use it as it flattens some irregularities (or follows a twist) rather than letting the cutterhead make an unsprung flat face. Usually I skip-surface just enough for the planer to take over. In my projects and style of use the cutterhead speed doesn't really make a huge difference in the overall stock prep time.

    Nice looking machine!
    http://vintagemachinery.org/photoind....aspx?id=18964

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    as of now I'm thinking of replacing the head/babbitt bearings and reworking a planer head on pillow block bearings. Theres a nice shelf to work off of to mount a new set up without having to modify the existing machine. I need to take pics of the machine in it's originality and document a few things so someone can piece it all back together in the future if they so choose. Question.... It's a 4" head right now, but most planer heads are 3". Is this going to be a problem other than clearance as you lower/raise the beds? I can fab the head mount easy enough, and have a neighbor who's a machinist, so not to worried about that end. Also still pricing helical/spiral heads.... I know I love my spiral head planer, but they are a little more $$$... I thought about reworking grizzly spiral planner head vs. buying a custom head, but you run into 3" head again. Just trying to plan this all out in my head. BTW just got my tables back from being ground flat again..... so flat and smooth, not to mention pretty!
    Only one life will soon be past
    Only whats done for Christ will last

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
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    Stay with the larger diameter if you can. Most older jointers were 4.25-5" at that width. The angle of attack might be less important with an insert head but the mass of the bigger diameter over the 16" width will make for a better cut. A 5 hp motor will be the right size for that machine. Dave

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Busenitz View Post
    as of now I'm thinking of replacing the head/babbitt bearings and reworking a planer head on pillow block bearings. Theres a nice shelf to work off of to mount a new set up without having to modify the existing machine. I need to take pics of the machine in it's originality and document a few things so someone can piece it all back together in the future if they so choose. Question.... It's a 4" head right now, but most planer heads are 3". Is this going to be a problem other than clearance as you lower/raise the beds? I can fab the head mount easy enough, and have a neighbor who's a machinist, so not to worried about that end. Also still pricing helical/spiral heads.... I know I love my spiral head planer, but they are a little more $$$... I thought about reworking grizzly spiral planner head vs. buying a custom head, but you run into 3" head again. Just trying to plan this all out in my head. BTW just got my tables back from being ground flat again..... so flat and smooth, not to mention pretty!
    got any pics of the table Jesse? sure looks like you on track to be able to do what you want with the pillow blocks. and ball bearing you can runn the head faster too. Seen that done well before with pillow blocks. the head size is more of a concern if your using the old bearings so a smaller head could be fitted if you block it up. Do the table side in and out as well as up and down? All you really need to see is if the the top of the cutter block can be set at the height of the old and the out feed table when set to 0. I make up wood mock up in the lathe when i am fitting cutter blocks. Going to be a killer jointer jesse
    jack
    English machines

  5. #20
    Jesse, talk to the folks at Holbren and similar places that sell a lot of Byrd heads:
    http://www.holbren.com/spiral-cutterhead-jointer/
    As you can see from their website, they convert a lot of machines that have larger cutterheads. Ask them to forward your contact info to folks who will have removed a 4" x 16" cutterhead. You could also ask them to quote a shelix head just to explore another option. Consider placing a wanted post in the classified forum for unused 4" x 16" cutterheads.

    I think it's important to stay with the proper diameter cutterhead to preserve the proper clearances throughout depth of cut adjustments. I like the idea of updating your jointer.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Whitewater Ks
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    584
    I'm doing some research and most of the manufactures are running around 5000 rpm. I'm wondering what pulley combo they're running to get from 3450 to 5000? According to my charts I'll need a 5" motor pulley and a 3 1/2" head pulley. I'm wondering how small I can go when running this much torque?

    Jack, the tables slide in/out as well as up/in and down/out so I can adjust it to wherever I want and I don't find myself making major up/down adjustments on my jointer. I do like the idea of more mass of a 4" but buying a 20" spiral planer head and reworking it would be a LOT cheaper... Heres some pics.... should've cleaned all the dust off. Also you can see the "shelves" I'm going to build off of. Jess

    I just called Grizzly and I can get a 4 5/8" 20" planer head for 1570$, tech wasn't sure if that included the inserts though. I'm getting a quote from both Byrd and Helix so we'll see where they're at $$$ wise.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Jesse Busenitz; 03-26-2015 at 6:14 PM. Reason: add info
    Only one life will soon be past
    Only whats done for Christ will last

  7. #22
    Jesse, great jointer! Surprised the tables needed grinding. By the looks of the pictures you posted at OWWM, the original planing marks could still be seen.

  8. #23
    looks like an easy conversion with the platform and the table adjustments. Tables look good. You want to keep the head pully smaller then the head so the fence can slide over top. Mass is good but HP is what does the work .keep us posted
    jack
    English machines

  9. #24
    FWIW I just checked my 16" American #1 w/ babbit bearings- it's got a 3hp 3-phase 1750 rpm motor, spinning a 10" pulley reduced to 5" at the head for 3450 rpm. works just fine for me. Jack, are you familiar with this jointer? would you recommend a pulley change at the head to up the rpms?
    Melad StudioWorks
    North Brookfield, MA

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Whitewater Ks
    Posts
    584
    [QUOTE=Ethan Melad;2397102]FWIW I just checked my 16" American #1 w/ babbit bearings- it's got a 3hp 3-phase 1750 rpm motor, spinning a 10" pulley reduced to 5" at the head for 3450 rpm. works just fine for me. Jack, are you familiar with this jointer? would you recommend a pulley change at the head to up the rpms?[/QUOTE

    That's one of the reasons, I'm thinking about going to ball bearings, as I don't think babbitt bearings are made for higher rpm.... someone correct me if I'm wrong. Also you can get more cuts per foot at a faster feed rate.
    Only one life will soon be past
    Only whats done for Christ will last

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
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    5,667
    I no very little about babbitt but fpm of the shaft is what you measure, not rpm. A small diameter shaft can run at higher rpm than a larger one in a babbitt application. The type of alloy is also very important when getting to higher speeds ( mainly tin with some nickel I think ). I hope the real babbitt guys will speak up and teach us all. DAve

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