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Thread: What magazines do you guys subscribe to?

  1. #16
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    Wood in the magazine form and Fine Woodworking online edition. I do agree that most repeat the same information.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Bokros View Post
    I subscribe to Wood Magazine, Woodsmith, Woodcraft Magazine, Wood Workers Journal.
    I subscribe to the same ones, I like Wood & Woodsmith best
    Dennis

  3. #18
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    Apr 2013
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    In order, Fine Woodworking, Popular Woodworking, Woodsmith, Wood. End up picking up WWJ, Woodcraft and Family Handyman at the store when need something to read. I actually prefer some of the British WWing mags that you find at Barnes & Noble.

  4. #19
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    Sep 2009
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    When I started down this rabbit hole, I had no knowledge, and access to no face-to-face-experts, and nothing like SMC existed.

    I subscribed to FWW for 12 - 15 years.

    I learned a lot. And - the articles that were beyond my skill level only inspired me to keep pushing: If it could be done, then it was "knowable". If it was knowable, then it was "learnable". I charged ahead, over-confident in my abilities, but undaunted by the stumbles as I mistaked my way up the learning curve. And, FWW was a guiding light.

    I cancelled my subscription about 6 - 7 years ago. I had evolved to a level where they weren't providing me with much, plus they were in what I consider to be a phase where they consciously decided to go "down-market" to try to expand their customer base. The infamous edition where the cover article !! was dowelled drawers was the last straw.

    Bu - still and all - I always give them credit for what they taught me, and the examples they showed that were stretch goals for me, over 8 - 10 years. I could not have gotten where I am - as limited as it sometimes seems - without FWW. I simply outgrew them. Which means, in all honesty, they did their job well.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    In order, Fine Woodworking, Popular Woodworking, Woodsmith, Wood. End up picking up WWJ, Woodcraft and Family Handyman at the store when need something to read. I actually prefer some of the British WWing mags that you find at Barnes & Noble.
    I used to absolutely love Popular Woodworking, right up until they combined that and Woodworking and took all the things I liked about PW out and put all the things I hated about WW in. I also had one of those cheap multi-year subscriptions to Wood, the ones where they give you 2 years for cheap, and I think I forgot I was even getting it by the end. It just stopped interesting me at all.

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Kent A Bathurst View Post
    When I started down this rabbit hole, I had no knowledge, and access to no face-to-face-experts, and nothing like SMC existed.

    I subscribed to FWW for 12 - 15 years.

    I learned a lot. And - the articles that were beyond my skill level only inspired me to keep pushing: If it could be done, then it was "knowable". If it was knowable, then it was "learnable". I charged ahead, over-confident in my abilities, but undaunted by the stumbles as I mistaked my way up the learning curve. And, FWW was a guiding light.

    I cancelled my subscription about 6 - 7 years ago. I had evolved to a level where they weren't providing me with much, plus they were in what I consider to be a phase where they consciously decided to go "down-market" to try to expand their customer base. The infamous edition where the cover article !! was dowelled drawers was the last straw.

    Bu - still and all - I always give them credit for what they taught me, and the examples they showed that were stretch goals for me, over 8 - 10 years. I could not have gotten where I am - as limited as it sometimes seems - without FWW. I simply outgrew them. Which means, in all honesty, they did their job well.
    Same here, I always had a subscription to FWW as the "ideal" and to another magazine, be it Popular Woodworking or something else, as the "actual". Reading FWW every month was like looking at an architectural magazine, the quality of work was phenomenal and the projects were high end. Then all that changed and it became one of the pack and that made it not worth bothering with anymore. I didn't outgrow them, they lowered their standards.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Central Illinois
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    I started with American Woodworker, Wood, and Fine Woodworking around '97/'98. Several years later I added Woodsmith/Shopsmith. AW and Wood were definitely the mags I learned a lot from early on. FWW had a lot of "Holy Grail" projects from my perspective as a neophyte. Nevertheless, that provided me with a lot of determination to improve my skills to one day be able to execute those types of projects. I dropped all my WW magazine subscriptions except for FWW in 2010. I found a lot of repetition within and between magazines as time went on. I still enjoy every issue of FWW.

  8. #23
    As was said by another poster, I think Fine Woodworking is currently the "best of a bad lot". FWW used to be better, but they now seem to split projects between print and web so as to induce you to subscribe to both venues for "the rest of the story". I'm not fond of the "bait & switch", so I no longer subscribe to FWW (or any other woodworking magazine). I still have the back issues from when the magazine was the only focus, which remain an excellent resource.

    One additional area FWW drops the ball is competitive power tool tests. An example would be the recent router test, where they gave high marks to a PC machine I know has issues with fine adjustment and repeatability...but an advertiser, so aparrantly they get a pass.

    You might be better off with the FWW back issue dvd, and a magazine with good tool tests (if one currently exists).

  9. #24
    Minimax was an advertiser with FWW for many years but discontinued that relationship in 2008. Funny: I still get it every month in my mailbox. I enjoy the "reader's projects" section in the back the most.

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Central NJ
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    835
    For me it's Fine Woodworking and American Woodturner (the mag you get when you join the American Association of Woodturners). Those interest me the most. I was subscribed to Shop Notes until they went under. My Wood subscription just ran out. Not sure if I will renew as it's getting harder to find time to read them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    You should also check out FWW's Shoptalk podcast. It's free like many podcasts. IMHO, it's the best of the three major ones out there. The others tend to have guys going on about projects they're working on. Shoptalk keeps it relevant to tools and techniques that you as a user can use.
    I agree on FWW's Shoptalk. For my money Mike P. alone makes it worth listening. I also listen to Shop Talk live, which is fun but sometimes remarkable what they don't know. What is the third "major" you mean? MWA? I do listen some times but don't expect to learn anything unless they have a good guest.

  11. #26
    I agree about Mike Pekovich. He's the best. So humble and so much knowledge. Even when he tries to be sarcastic like Matt, it just comes off cute and innocent. Matt K, though! He needs to chill a tad. Last week Ed Pirnik was all excited about a depth gauge he got for a song and cleaned up. Matt K had to one up him yet again by saying he got his Starrett for even cheaper, rust free. And then he kicks him by saying he never uses his, and Ed will never use his either. He should be on Framework!

    Anyway, the 3 are (in my order of pref) Shoptalk, Woodtalk, and MWA. MWA just rambles IMHO. Woodtalk takes on heavy debates like, 'Is it right to spend a lot of time on your shop furniture" or "should you take a class?" I mean these are philosophical debates that just don't matter to me. They inevitably end in 'make what makes you happy', and 'take what makes you happy'. Shoptalk focuses on user questions, favorite off-beat tools of the hosts, and mistakes they made that you might want to avoid yourself. Ed P takes a back seat to the other guys in terms of experience, but his organization of the show is top notch.

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