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Thread: a good 135 degree miter square?

  1. #1
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    a good 135 degree miter square?

    So... I just checked the miter square (with a starrett miter square) I've been using for the past year and it's about a 1/16 out of alignment over 6 inches. Wow.

    While the Starrett miter square works for 45 degrees... it doesn't have a way to measure 135 degrees. So I'm in the market for a 135 degree "square". Any suggestions?
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  2. #2
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    Bevel gauge and a protractor? Unless you are looking for machined accuracy. Can you not get to the other side of whatever and use a 45 on that?
    Last edited by Curt Putnam; 01-25-2015 at 8:04 PM.

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    Have you looked at the Stanley #16 mitre (miter) square?

    Picture 3.jpg

    There are a few on ebay and other sources around the net. Try both spellings. They are also available from other makers and would have different model numbers.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
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    I have the General Electronic Miter Gage. It works really well and I find it to be accurate.

    http://www.sears.com/general-tools-s...&mktRedirect=y



    Another option is to make one that suits your needs. A bit of scrap cherry or maple will make a nice one. You could make it the size that suits you.

    A large 45 degree drafting triangle or a 12" speed square might sufice also.
    Last edited by lowell holmes; 01-25-2015 at 9:52 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    I have the General Electronic Miter Gage. It works really well and I find it to be accurate.

    http://www.sears.com/general-tools-s...&mktRedirect=y
    That's almost as cheap as a decent one that has been around for a century.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
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    These Japanese-Style Layout Squares from Lee Valley are pretty good.

    I have the 45+90 for use on my table saw and the best part is you get to upgrade to Metric if you so wish.

    60n0310av2.jpg
    "If you have all your fingers, you can convert to Metric"

  7. #7
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    I also have 3 manual miter gages of different sizes, an adjustable triangle, General protractor and large drafting triangles. I do use the electronic gage frequently.

    I would make a wooden 135 gage like the one you showed in a heartbeat if the need arises.

    I do admire your gage. If you set the large miter gage with the blade at it's mid point and the blade at 45 degrees, it will make the same measurement.
    Last edited by lowell holmes; 01-26-2015 at 2:04 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Have you looked at the Stanley #16 mitre (miter) square?

    Picture 3.jpg
    I have a similar style square made by Crown, I think. That's the one that's off by a few degrees. Ultimately, I was hoping to find more of an machinist/engineers square of a similar design, or perhaps just the 135 degree angle. If I'm not able to find one, I'll tune the Crown... but I'm looking for something more reliable/accurite.

    If anyone has the David Charlesworth secret miter dovetail video... I'd be interested in the gauge he uses, but I'm not wedded to that design.

    EDIT: thanks for linking to the Lee Valley japanese style squares, that might work too.
    Last edited by jamie shard; 01-26-2015 at 1:05 PM.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamie shard View Post
    So... I just checked the miter square (with a starrett miter square) I've been using for the past year and it's about a 1/16 out of alignment over 6 inches. Wow.

    While the Starrett miter square works for 45 degrees... it doesn't have a way to measure 135 degrees. So I'm in the market for a 135 degree "square". Any suggestions?
    Use the 45 degree angle with the miter gauge in the slot on the other side of the blade.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Barry View Post
    Use the 45 degree angle with the miter gauge in the slot on the other side of the blade.
    I'm probably asking a silly question... are you saying use the blade against the reference surface and mark along the body of the square?
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamie shard View Post
    I'm probably asking a silly question... are you saying use the blade against the reference surface and mark along the body of the square?
    What Pat is saying is that 45 degrees is marked (or measured) using the acute side of the rule (with the body of the gauge against the wood), whilst 135 degrees is found on the obtuse side.
    "If you have all your fingers, you can convert to Metric"

  12. #12
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    I think using a square that way would be referencing off the other surface of the wood -- right? I think this make sense for machists with more accurite blocks of metal, but for neander woodworking I'm ideally trying to use only the main reference surface for marking, if that makes sense... That's what I like about the design of the Stanley #16 style miter square.
    clamp the work
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  13. #13
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    I don't quite understand what this discussion is all about. A combination square will give you 90 degree, and 45 degree marks. Since the reciprocal of 45 degrees is 135 degrees, the combination square will give it to you. My Starrett combination square is dead on. I can see wanting a Stanley miter square because it is nice to look at.
    If you are not getting true surfaces, the issue is not likely to be the combination square. Even the BORG squares are accurate.

    Tri squares are another issue. If you buy one, you will have work on it to make it true, at least that has been my experience. I can see that a poorly prepared miter square would be inaccurart as well.
    Last edited by lowell holmes; 01-26-2015 at 7:13 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamie shard View Post
    I'm probably asking a silly question... are you saying use the blade against the reference surface and mark along the body of the square?
    I assumed you were talking about setting the miter gauge to 45 deg and measuring that angle relative to the blade. For me this would typically be done with the miter gauge in the slot to the left of the blade. You want to measure 135 which has the miter gauge turned 45 degrees the other direction, right? Thats exactly the same as placing the miter gauge in the right hand slot. Now, I'm assuming the two miter gauge slots are parallel. I think that should normally be a good assumption

  15. #15
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    Here is a mitre square you can make.

    Mitersquare_0001.jpg


    I guess the picture says it all.
    I will make one from some cherry I have laying around.
    I think the picture is self explanatory. The wood will be 3/8" thick in each part.
    Total width of the handle will be 1 1/8"

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