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Thread: Ever see something that just makes you want to quit?

  1. #16
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    I know that feeling Zach and it's a great one. The sense of wonder and admiration that strikes a cord is a feeling to be treasured.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    A woodworking teacher I had gave me some advice when I first tackled a complex project. He said that every project can be broken down into individual small steps. And if you can do each small step, or learn how to do that step, you can do a very complex piece. A complex piece often just has a lot of steps but if you take them one at a time, you'll complete the project.

    Mike
    Some times the hard part is determining what order the steps need to be taken.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #18
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    is that the one in the Toledo Museum? seems like i saw one that looked an awful lot like that up there ... over the top ornate. 17th century bling?

  4. #19
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    Don Williams has developed an artificial tortoiseshell for use in restoration. He started to write it up on his blog a few months ago but didn't get very far. Something involving poured resin sheets with brushed pigments for the coloring. Looked interesting, hope he will write more about it.

  5. #20
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    It took if I recall correctly,19 distinct tradesmen to build a gun of reasonable quality in England in the 18th. C.. Many more if the piece was chiseled and embellished.

    The same might be true if this piece.

    It is not to my taste either,though the workmanship is fine. I do not think the overall design is that tasteful. Mostly,I enjoy the marquetry.

    At the time,those squared off legs would have been more trouble than round ones,without a bandsaw,but I still prefer round trumpet legs. Don't care for the colors that much either,though they probably have changed in the life of the piece. Red is always fugitive.

    You might try looking at Stewart MacDonald's guitar supply catalog. They sell some pretty realistic tortoise shell pick guard material,and each piece is individually stained while the material is still liquid. So,none are exactly alike. I used some of it on my last guitar. Very nice stuff.

    Really,I don't consider that there is anything on that piece that could not be accurately made By you or me,except I just do not have the energy,or the desire to get into a project like that. While I enjoyed the challenge of making marquetry guitars,my personal preference is for plain but elegant work.
    Last edited by george wilson; 12-31-2014 at 6:06 PM.

  6. #21
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    There where of course workshops in many sizes at that time as well as today. The largest and most famous ones, the kind who might have made a abinet like this, where run by a master who didn't do handwork himself. He was running the business.

    I remember a woodcarving business at the end of the 17th century. The master and his wife were running an orphanage. Very usefull for cheap labor. They made some incredible stuff. Jan de Rijke:

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...1327_-_RCE.jpg
    Last edited by Kees Heiden; 01-01-2015 at 5:35 AM.

  7. #22
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    In my opinion that thing is seriously ugly. I would never want to build anything like it. Given time and money, we can do whatever we set our minds to. If you consider sending an unmanned explorer to Mars, building a piece like this is actually quite simple. Below are a couple chairs I found on Google images that would require a higher skill level to build right, and is something like I hope to achieve some day.

    contemporary-windsor-variation-chairs-by-becker.jpg
    Last edited by Moses Yoder; 01-01-2015 at 8:58 AM.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] "You don't have to give birth to someone to have a family." (Sandra Bullock)




  8. #23
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    Everyone has their own opinions Moses. No worries. Welsh stick chairs are sorta neat. Not my thing at all, but neat enough to get plenty of attention. I don't agrer re: the skill required to produce them but no worries.
    Your endgrain is like your bellybutton. Yes, I know you have it. No, I don't want to see it.

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Moses Yoder View Post
    In my opinion that thing is seriously ugly. I would never want to build anything like it. Given time and money, we can do whatever we set our minds to. If you consider sending an unmanned explorer to Mars, building a piece like this is actually quite simple. Below are a couple chairs I found on Google images that would require a higher skill level to build right, and is something like I hope to achieve some day.

    contemporary-windsor-variation-chairs-by-becker.jpg
    I don't like ostentatious seventeenth- or eighteenth-century furniture any more than gaudy Victorian stuff, though I can appreciate the craftsmanship and work that went into making it.

    Over the past forty years I have restored my fair share of high-end eighteenth-century British furniture and made a few copies too. I have also made dozens of Windsor chairs and I can state with some authority that a reasonably talented woodworker can learn everything necessary to make a Windsor chair in a weekend, whereas it takes an exceptionally skilled craftsman a lifetime of work to produce furniture of the calibre illustrated by the OP.
    Regards,
    Leo.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zach Dillinger View Post
    I did on Saturday. Never happened before. Not that I'll quit making furniture or anything, but it takes something out of it to recognize that I will never make anything this good.

    c.1690 Dutch cabinet. Ebony, tortoiseshell, ivory, and floral marquetry. My pictures are lame given the no-flash rule, but they give you the idea.

    I think I'll go drown my sadness in some gin in honor of the brilliant Dutch cabinetmaker(s) who made this.
    I dunno...

    What couldn't you make? If you don't look at the whole, but take it apart in your mind...it might not be all that hard.

    You might be surprised. You could very possibly be able to reproduce something like this.

    Granted...it would cost you a fortune...

    And quite probably take you 150 yrs...
    I am never wrong.

    Well...I thought I was wrong once...but I was mistaken.

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