Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: Setting up my "new" Delta bandsaw, resaw or not?

  1. #1

    Setting up my "new" Delta bandsaw, resaw or not?

    In anticipation of finally getting my shop finished and running I purchased a basically unused (late 70's) Delta bandsaw some months back from Craigslist. The saw came with a resaw extension and I'm wondering if I should leave it in the box or install it now? Having never used a bandsaw with a resaw attachment I'm curious as to how it will affect everyday use, i.e. when not resawing. It seems that to put this attachment on and off for the infrequent times I might want to resaw will be a p.i.t.a so why not just leave it on?

  2. #2
    Are you talking about a riser block or a resaw fence.

    If it is the riser block you want to leave it on, the blade length will be different.

    I have a Jet 14" without a riser on it and find that there have only been 2 or 3 times I wish I had a riser. In most cases I could just cut the wood down and then do the resaw with no problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    295
    I have an old Delta bandsaw that has a riser block on it. I've never taken it off and can't see why one would. -Howard

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Enchanted land of beer, cheese & brats
    Posts
    1,314
    The old (mid 80's) delta bandsaw I bought had it installed already and though most of my cuts are not resaw type (in fact only once have I used the extra height it provides) I never thought of removing/uninstalling the riser block. As mentioned you do need different blade lengths, 105" IIRC.

    If I had the smaller blade lengths on hand I'd use those up then install the riser block and not look back.

    Oh and you also need a longer guide support, not sure if you have that too.
    I got cash in my pocket. I got desire in my heart....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    5,879
    The first time you need it, put it on and get the longer blades. Then leave it on - after you put it on once and get everyting in alignment, you will have no interest in ever taking it off again.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Kent A Bathurst View Post
    The first time you need it, put it on and get the longer blades. Then leave it on - after you put it on once and get everyting in alignment, you will have no interest in ever taking it off again.
    Well I have a little different take on that, if you are going to put it on, do it before you start buying shorter blades. I have about 8 blades for my saw and if I switched now to a riser block they would just hang on the wall for ever and never get used.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    5,879
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Huber View Post
    Well I have a little different take on that, if you are going to put it on, do it before you start buying shorter blades. I have about 8 blades for my saw and if I switched now to a riser block they would just hang on the wall for ever and never get used.
    I agree - I was just assuming he had it running, with the shorter blades, today. I went a number years before I needed the increased height, and that is when I got the riser block kit and longer blades - I only had a couple 50% used blades, so no great loss.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Seabrook, TX (south of Houston)
    Posts
    3,093
    Blog Entries
    3
    All good suggestions for you. If you have never had a band saw before or don't know what the riser block will do for you, it basically increases the width of th board you will be able to resaw. Without the riser on a 14" saw, you can resaw approximately 6" wide boards. With the riser, approximately 12" wide. So, for you to consider is whether or not you will need to resaw wider boards. And as has been pointed out, you will need different length blades because obviously, you are raising one wheel higher.

    If you knew all this, forgive me. Not trying to talk down to you; just don't know your experience level.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Enchanted land of beer, cheese & brats
    Posts
    1,314
    I mentioned it above but you do also need the longer support for the upper guide. If you install just the riser block your guides will not be able to be lowered enough for those 5" and less cuts, the majority of your bandsaw work.
    I got cash in my pocket. I got desire in my heart....

  10. #10
    Thanks to all who responded to my original post and apologies for the fact I obviously left out details. As I eluded to earlier I am new to woodworking. I had wood shop class in junior high school almost 40 years ago. 20 years ago my father in-law and I built all the cabinetry for the kitchens and bathrooms so I have an understanding of basic principals around cabinet making and the use of the tools to do so. I am about to roll a garage worth of equipment into my recently completed dedicated shop and I'm anticipating all the set up, tuning and to some extent cleaning of equipment I've been accumulating for 18 months. The band saw is just one of those pieces of equipment that I'll be dealing with.

    The riser is not currently installed but in a box with the rest of the parts for the Delta's 28-984 Height Attachment (For Delta 14" Band Saws.) There is also an additional blade that came with the saw but I'm not sure if that blade is for the saw in the current "stock" configuration or when the riser is attached. I do not have a resaw fence yet but have the supplies etc to make one when and if I need.

    I have never used this saw, but do have limited experience using a band saw and a Delta at that and though I am aware of the reasons to use a riser, I'm not sure just when in my very early woodworking hobby I'll need or want to resaw. So the question was posed really to help make a decision as to whether or not I go through the trouble of installing the rise etc just now. I don't detect a strong argument for undertaking this job immediately. Given that the table saw, drill press, jointer and planer will need cleaning and tuning I'm inclined to let the riser stay in the box for now. Thanks again to all who weighed in.

    BTW If you haven't seen my post in the WorkShop forum "Your High School shop from the 70's" http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...om-the-70-s%85 please take a minute to check it out and give input if you feel like it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    5,879
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Welsh View Post
    .......... I'm not sure just when in my very early woodworking hobby I'll need or want to resaw. So the question was posed really to help make a decision as to whether or not I go through the trouble of installing the rise etc just now. I don't detect a strong argument for undertaking this job immediately. Given that the table saw, drill press, jointer and planer will need cleaning and tuning I'm inclined to let the riser stay in the box for now. Thanks again to all who weighed in.
    Bingo. Your approach makes perfect sense. No need to immediately set up to resaw wides if you haven't gotten time undre you belt on the saw itself. Label the box with the parts, and stick it in tehe way-back somewhere. You will have no uncertainty when it is time to cig it out and install it.

    Sounds like you are going to have a lot of fun. Good luck.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    central PA
    Posts
    1,774
    Others may disagree and I have no experience with a riser block, but my feeling is: A (I'm assuming) 14" BS with a 1 HP motor, isn't the right tool for resawing more than 6" anyway. I have a similar Grizzly and there hasn't been but a few times where I wished I could resaw a wider board, but I suspect if you eventually want to do much resawing a bigger BS will be on your wish list.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    2,993
    I'd put it on the first time you need to buy a new blade. While it's not a difficult installation you don't want to be putting it on and off and there's no harm or cost to having it in place. Chances are you'll bump into that 6" limit sooner rather than later. It's not just resawing, it's things like cutting cheeks on large tenons, or roughing bowl blanks if you do turning that demand more height.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,653
    Blog Entries
    1
    I put a riser block on my Jet 14" BS soon after I bought it. I've left it on. It simplifies blade inventory.

    I am currently using a 3/8" 4 tpi skiptooth bi-metallic blade from Highland Highland Hardware. It is a Sterling blade and I like it a lot.

  15. #15
    I have a delta with riser block that I first installed when I got the machine, so have never tried it without. The difference in blade cost is minimal so why not go with the extra length. My question from reading this thread is this: I s there any reason machine performance wise, not to install a riser? Is it harder to adjust the guides ? is it harder to keep the proper tension? My assumption is that longer blades will run cooler and last longer, so that could be a plus for the riser. Any other thoughts?
    Scott
    Scott Loven

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •