Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Interesting drawer joint detail

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Lafayette, OH
    Posts
    365

    Interesting drawer joint detail

    In cleaning out an old barn for demolition, I found a couple of drawers from what was described as an "antique barber's stand". Most of the thing was ruined, but the drawer detail here is something I've never seen anywhere else. These are not dowels; they are cut from the drawer front and sides. Surely these aren't hand-done ... but what tool was used? The "dowels" are very precisely spaced and cut.

    Barber drawer 1.jpg
    Barber drawer 2.jpg

    The rear (not shown) is the same - pegs cut into the drawer rear and receiving holes in the drawer side (but without the scallop detail that's on the front).

    Anyone ever see anything like this before?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Camas, Wa
    Posts
    3,638
    I recall seeing a dovetail jog template that does that but I can't seem to locate it at the moment..

  3. #3
    I believe that is called a Knapp joint after the inventor Charles Knapp. Sometimes referred to as a pin and scallop. It was the first machined dovetail type drawer joint and produced from around 1870 to 1900. By 1900, the machine version of the true dovetail joint was perfected and became more popular due to it's more traditional look. At that point, the Knapp machines were out of business. It's a good way to date a piece of antique furniture because it gives you a window of production, i.e. 1870 to 1900.

    Tom
    East Side of Big D

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Coastal Virginia
    Posts
    635
    It's called a Knapp joint. Been around since about 1880.

    http://www.thewoodworksinc.com/artic...sent_joint.php

    There's a router template available IIRC to make a modern version.

    Mike

    Looks like Tom types faster than me

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Altanta area, GA
    Posts
    72
    This is the way that I would do it without having one of the modern router jigs for it ....

    I would use a drill press with a plug cutter for the pegs -- indexed so the spacing is right. The holes are also indexed -- with the same indexing that was used for the plug cutter. Then I would use a band saw for the curves on the side board to match after having a jig to mark the curves that would have dowels that fit in the holes that were drilled first ...

    BTW, this is just thinking about the problem without any knowledge about how it was actually done ...
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    3,889
    I have several pieces of furniture that were from my parents with Knapp joint drawers.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    3,889
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hoffmann View Post
    This is the way that I would do it without having one of the modern router jigs for it ....

    I would use a drill press with a plug cutter for the pegs -- indexed so the spacing is right. The holes are also indexed -- with the same indexing that was used for the plug cutter. Then I would use a band saw for the curves on the side board to match after having a jig to mark the curves that would have dowels that fit in the holes that were drilled first ...

    BTW, this is just thinking about the problem without any knowledge about how it was actually done ...
    I'd say without some very serious templating (band sawing would be rough) itd be a tough go. The joints on the furniture I have are very clean and tight. This was one of the early types of industrualized drawer (speed) construction.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,085
    Another name for it is pin and scallop.

    Here's a template for making it. http://woodworker.com/small-crescent...su-878-561.asp

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Three Rivers, Central Oregon
    Posts
    2,251
    Yep, it's a Knapp joint.....manufactured between ~1870 and ~1900. I have a family heirloom dresser that has Knapp joint drawer boxes.

    Some interesting info on Knapp joints: http://www.antiquetrader.com/antique...ovetail_joints
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by scott vroom; 08-03-2014 at 11:26 AM.
    Scott Vroom

    If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

    Bernard Baruch

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Lafayette, OH
    Posts
    365
    thx all for the info/links. this is a pretty joint (IMO); i'd like to try a couple at some point ... but the originals, not the router jig. part of the attraction is the very sharp cut line at the bottom of the half moon. trying to figure out now what kind of mechanism could make that cut. time to google ...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,085
    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Schafer View Post
    thx all for the info/links. this is a pretty joint (IMO); i'd like to try a couple at some point ... but the originals, not the router jig. part of the attraction is the very sharp cut line at the bottom of the half moon. trying to figure out now what kind of mechanism could make that cut. time to google ...
    The original method was machined. A router is not much different from the original.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •