Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 63

Thread: Does a drill press need to be bolted down?

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Berwick, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    418
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Zellers View Post
    Well, assuming one likes cat treats.

    Me, I'd add it to all the money I didn't spend on unnecessary precautions on my other tools (like static grounding wire for my DC) and buy a good bottle of wine to enjoy with my sweetie.

    Nothing quite like emerging from the basement coated in a fine layer of exotic hardwood dust on a Friday evening and popping the cork on a nice Cab Sav as you fire up the barbie.
    +1 to this concept.

  2. Revisiting this old thread...

    I'm new to the forum and have been researching this topic as I prepare to install my new Porter-Cable PCB660DP 15" floor-stand drill press. My present plan is to bolt the DP base to an overlapping "tic-tac-toe" web of 2x4's to help stabilize the DP for initial. I'm 6'-7, so the extra 3" of tool height should be an extra benefit. Once the DP finds a more-or-less permanent location in my shop, I'll look into adjusting the web size and lag bolting it into the floor joists.

    Thanks for the helpful discussion above.

    Regards,
    Jim

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bellingham, Washington
    Posts
    1,149
    My drill press has been in place for 18 years. It has a 90# bag of sand on its base. I have never had a reason to move it from its original location.
    Bracken's Pond Woodworks

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    4,410
    How can you walk it around the floor to where you need it if it's bolted down? I've never owned one bolted down, including the big one in the metal shop.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    'over here' - Ireland
    Posts
    2,532
    Seems like a bit of a pays your money takes your pick sort of deal.

    The 'safety' argument must be to bolt it down - especially if it has the fairly typical smallish footprint of the more budget machines. A secondary risk is the possibility of getting something caught up in a revolving chuck while grabbing to stabilise a wobble.

    The trouble (as i can say from experience) is that no sooner is it bolted down than a job will come along that could use moving it.

    Mine (a typical 3/4HP eastern model) once unbolted was never bolted down again. Against that it very nearly ended up falling over a couple of times in about 18 years.

    I compromised by always keeping a foot on the baseplate while working, but it wouldn't pass as safe in a public work environment. An enlarged base from ply or something projecting out to the sides and to the front so you stand on it sounds like a good idea......

  6. #51
    One shop I worked in was actually cited by Osha inspector for a too small DP base. We thought it was nutty but the cheaper machines do seem top heavy.

  7. #52
    Mine has never been bolted down and it has never come close to tipping over. It is an old floor standing craftsman and the base is very heavy cast iron. No need at all to bolt it down. If I had one that was tippy, I would cable it to the wall or ceiling, not bolt it to the floor.

  8. #53
    My Ridgid is bolted to two 2x6's that run perpendicular to the "head" of the machine. It's not bolted to the floor. It's been fine for 10 years.
    Last edited by Frederick Skelly; 09-30-2015 at 8:00 AM. Reason: clarify

  9. #54
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
    Posts
    4,471
    In my experience, generally NO!!!
    Jerry

  10. #55
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,768
    Blog Entries
    11
    Mine is located in a corner of the shop, so when I need to drill longer pieces, it needs to move, therefore it isn't bolted down. See post #30.
    NOW you tell me...

  11. #56
    speaking from experience - i have had one topple over on me. i sometimes drill very large objects so i built an oversize table to accommodate the projects, so i have to get on the ground underneath in order to turn the crank to raise and lower the table, and one day it all came down.

    post no. 6 was my solution. a short rope to the ceiling and it is safe now.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    My Ridgid is bolted to two 2x6's that run perpendicular to the "head" of the machine. It's not bolted to the floor. It's been fine for 10 years.
    This sounds similar to my "web" notion. I (think I) get the side-to-side stability concept. No front-to-back tipping/rocking issues?

    Thanks / Jim
    Last edited by James Goodnight; 09-30-2015 at 10:37 AM.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    3,478
    Quote Originally Posted by James Goodnight View Post
    Revisiting this old thread...

    I'm new to the forum and have been researching this topic as I prepare to install my new Porter-Cable PCB660DP 15" floor-stand drill press. My present plan is to bolt the DP base to an overlapping "tic-tac-toe" web of 2x4's to help stabilize the DP for initial. I'm 6'-7, so the extra 3" of tool height should be an extra benefit. Once the DP finds a more-or-less permanent location in my shop, I'll look into adjusting the web size and lag bolting it into the floor joists.

    Thanks for the helpful discussion above.

    Regards,
    Jim
    No one said it depends on the drill press. I have the PC and it does not have to be bolted down. One of these days I will make a mobile base for it, but haven't gotten around to it.
    My last DP was a Laguna. Breathing hard on it would have toppled it. I put it on some 2x4s to increase the base width. Since I am 8" shorter than you and find the PC a good height, adding 7" isn't a bad idea; but that is probably true for all WW tools.

  14. Wade,

    Thanks for your perspectives. I found sound old PT 6x6 cut-offs in my garage, so I'll probably start with those for DP stabilization and height "correction".

    Finding a comfortable working height has long been a challenge for me. My shortest work bench is 36" tall, and is OK. My preferred work bench is a 40" inch one I built. It's great for surface work and assembly, but it's a bit high for many power tools.

    My next bench will be somewhere in the ~38" range, but will include a 3-1/2" depression for my miter saw.

    Thanks again / Jim

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Ashburn, Virginia
    Posts
    1,946
    Blog Entries
    2
    I bolt down all my machines that aren't on mobile bases.

    My drill press is a standard floor type Delta. It's very top heavy.

    PHM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •