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Thread: 4x8 Sheets Fit These Vehicles...

  1. #106
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    North -Eastern Ontario, Canada
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    271
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    ...But for hauling stuff, especially sheet goods, nothing beats a little utility trailer....
    Actually, a full size van is probably the most practical vehicle for carrying stuff. Since we've been in business (early 70's) weve never been without a good 3/4 ton van. When you are carrying anything you dont want rain, snow, dirt etc to get onto, an open trailer (as well as an open bed pickup) fails. Plus the floor is pretty low to the ground. Much lower than a full size pickup.

    We have several trailers (open and enclosed) two pickups and a van available at work. The van always gets used the most, unless it is too much to put in then the enclosed cargo trailer gets used.

    I understand not everyone wants to have a larger vehicle. But if you want to talk practicality... van is #1. I have a 2001 GMC Savana 2500 with their large V6 that gets decent mileage for the size, and can be loaded pretty heavily. Not as much as the Sierra 2500, but its way easier to load for cabinets and the like.

    As for damaging a new pickup - with most I see now having heavy sprayed in liners, not going to be an issue. These trucks are made to work, not look pretty.
    Andrew J. Coholic

  2. #107
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    North -Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    271
    I have a regular customer that comes to pick up material (finished and raw stuff like plywoods) and ties it all on top of his Jeep. I shake my head every time - thats fine now, but in a few months when its wet snow and freezing rain season, what does a nice sheet of unfinished hardwood ply look like after that? Tarping everything isnt easy, or efficient either. Plus you need an enclosed area to wrap things up and load up, and the same to unload - which isnt always possible.
    Andrew J. Coholic

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    13,705
    If you're going to get a van get one that makes it easy to carry sheet goods in any weather. This one has eleven feet of space from the back of the seats to the rear doors and 53" between the wheel wells. I can carry 12 foot long sheets of solid surface material if I stand it on its edge between the seats. A six cylinder diesel has plenty of torque and gets 24 MPG in town or on the highway loaded or empty. The center of the van is 75" tall inside and both the side and rear doors will accommodate a full size pallet.

    In 2011 this one was cheaper then any of the new full size pickup trucks I found at the time.
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    Last edited by Chris Padilla; 08-22-2016 at 2:08 PM.

  4. #109
    I just priced out a Ford Transit van for work. $43,000! Holy crap! For a stripped down, one ton, work van. That's insanity.

  5. #110
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    North -Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    271
    Yes brand new is costly. For a work van look at something a year or two old. Knocks 1/3 or more off the price.
    Andrew J. Coholic

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lawrenceburg, Tenn.
    Posts
    1,123
    I still have my Avalanche, and with the midgate down, you can fit a stack of plywood in it with the tailgate up.

    Doc
    As Cort would say: Fools are the only folk on the earth who can absolutely count on getting what they deserve.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    North -Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    271
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Outten View Post
    If you're going to get a van get one that makes it easy to carry sheet goods in any weather. This one has eleven feet of space from the back of the seats to the rear doors and 53" between the wheel wells. I can carry 12 foot long sheets of solid surface material if I stand it on its edge between the seats. A six cylinder diesel has plenty of torque and gets 24 MPG in town or on the highway loaded or empty. The center of the van is 75" tall inside and both the side and rear doors will accommodate a full size pallet.

    In 2011 this one was cheaper then any of the new full size pickup trucks I found at the time.
    Thats the one I want next. For sure, delivering cabinets etc will be so much easier. Up here the new style vans just debuted this year. I'll replace our savana with an extended height/length one in a year or two when they are on the used market.
    Last edited by Chris Padilla; 08-22-2016 at 2:09 PM.
    Andrew J. Coholic

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Outten View Post
    If you're going to get a van get one that makes it easy to carry sheet goods in any weather. This one has eleven feet of space from the back of the seats to the rear doors and 53" between the wheel wells. I can carry 12 foot long sheets of solid surface material if I stand it on its edge between the seats. A six cylinder diesel has plenty of torque and gets 24 MPG in town or on the highway loaded or empty. The center of the van is 75" tall inside and both the side and rear doors will accommodate a full size pallet.

    In 2011 this one was cheaper then any of the new full size pickup trucks I found at the time.
    I see the badge in front and figure that must be one of the Sprinter Cargo models. Its capacity is attractive, but it seems too big to be garage & parking space friendly. Have you seen the Metris Cargo Van (European Vito) model? Mercedes marketing suggests it has most of the goodness in a much more driving friendly package. (Of course it is too new to the US for used ones to be available. Even too new for new ones to be widespread.) At least on KBB price estimator they (Metris specifically, vans in general) still show up a little cheaper than pickups of similar capacity.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Chris Padilla; 08-22-2016 at 2:09 PM.

  9. #114
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    13,705
    My Sprinter van is the same footprint of any normal full sized van. The height is about nine feet from the ground to the roof so there are places like residential and commercial parking garages that aren't accessible. Other than the height, which I see as an advantage for the most part, the Sprinter 2500 is an asset in performance. Lots of power, pulls a trailer with ease and fits in any standard parking space. It drives like a dream, the exception being high wind situations even though it has a stabilization feature that counteracts lean in a corner. The sail area of the tall sides can be cause for concern when crossing bridges when there is a high cross wind.

    The day to day performance is where this one shines. Even though its a cargo van it came with nice features like air conditioning, cruise control, power steering, comfortable seats, etc. The load capacity is 1,850 pounds. Without side windows the side mirrors have to be well designed and the stock mirrors are dual sets on each side (wide angle and standard), both are adjustable. The only change I made to mine was upgrading the stock radio to one that has a built in GPS/Maps and a backup camera.

    If you use a truck infrequently you can manage to get just about any job done one way or another but it can be very inconvenient in some cases. Although my van isn't used daily I enjoy the idea that weather isn't going to be a problem when I have to pick up materials or load it down with signs and tools for an install on the other side of the state. I never miss having to crawl on my knees in the back of my pickup truck with a cap on it to get to a box of signs, the box I needed was always in the front end of the bed. Possibly one of the biggest disadvantages of owning a Sprinter is that your friends and family know who to call when they need to move furniture

    Oh, when you're driving a long distance and in need of a nap a hammock attached to the ceiling works great...
    Last edited by Chris Padilla; 08-22-2016 at 2:11 PM.

  10. #115
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Turkovich View Post
    The new Chrysler Pacifica mini-van can be configured to hold a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood or can be configured to seat 8 people. It is also rated for 28mpg on the highway.
    I haven't bought a brand new car in decades, but..... Somebody's gonna check out the Chrysler dealer tomorrow.

  11. #116
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northern UT
    Posts
    730
    I can't haul ply in my truck, but I can fit in 11' long hard wood boards in it. I drive a Toyota Corolla and it has carried more lumber than many trucks I have seen. For sheet goods, I use a 97 Suburban. I can fit in ply, mdf and even 5 x 5, though it is a tight fit.

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