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Thread: The World's Most Compicated Joinery

  1. #1

    The World's Most Compicated Joinery

    RE: The World’s Most Complicated Joinery

    Friends and Creditors Alike,


    For a large project, I need to purflingbutt the dado trim reveals with an oblique channel-plotted goosetail (blind) and join each radial section with a covert rabbet flange (sequester doweled), so that the projection angle scribed to the mangle rail is left proud like the traditional (Shaker) “Aunt Bea’s complaint” joint- of course rat-tailed in the back, but for surfacing reasons I don’t want to use a deflection adze if I can help it- I don’t have a rifled one.

    Obviously, a carting-roll spanner jig will be necessary and I have the necessary three sizes of pledging saw, concave spoon planes (though these may be too small), and wheeking spokeshave trimmers. Wheeking spokeshaves as you know were originally used for bland scribing the boxing laps of hull planking and are difficult to find in small sizes.

    Any ideas on doing a lot of these quickly? Will I need farling chisels?

    Thanks in advance- this is the one place I know that can help!

    Alan Caro
    Last edited by Alan Caro; 02-19-2014 at 10:24 AM.

  2. #2
    Two buckets of steam and a quart of carbuncle custard will be needed to fit the joinery, too, I'm sure.

  3. #3
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    Motorize your farling chisels with dual-reverse giggle-bearings for a smooth cutting action.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  4. #4
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    Farling chisels tend to have a hair too much trajectory for such a task. I would recommend you substitute with hollow skew point augers.
    Woodworking is terrific for keeping in shape, but it's also a deadly serious killing system...

  5. #5
    For some reason, I keep seeing "facial chisels" when you guys use the word farling. Sounds like something from a Tammy Faye Toolkit.

  6. #6
    I found a good source for wheeking spokeshaves but unfortunately forum policy doesn't allow me to post links to it.

  7. #7
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    Any ideas on doing a lot of these quickly?
    I am sure it could be done quicker than I will understand what the heck it is all supposed to mean.

    It made me think I had slept through the end of February and all of March to awake on the first day of April.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
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    Alan: I just hope you are not going to request the use of MY shop for this project. My table saw sulks in the corner when it gets overly confused.

  9. #9
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    The folks who sell board stretchers and plaid paint should be able to help with your inquiry. You should be able to find them on the top floor of the local hospital. Where the psyche ward is located.

  10. #10
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    I'm totally confused. Do I mix the steam and carbuncle custard first , then apply the resultant vapor slurry to the joint or do I apply each in individual layers?
    -- Dan Rode

    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit." - Aristotle

  11. #11
    Quickly? No. But it's possible. You'll need to use a di-chromatic oscillating Finnegan pin as a fulcrum to even have a chance at success, and mind the gap on that Aunt Bea joint, lest you incite the complaint it was named for.

  12. #12
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    You've got to admire those old masters, doing that kind of work all with hand tools. Modern woodworkers, with no training in fine hand tool skills, do the work with a retroencabulating, oscculating spindleless sander, and think they're hot stuff.

  13. #13
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    I had to teach one of the maintenance men that the correct way to say "joint" was "jernt". Not sure if he bought it.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by george wilson View Post
    Alan: I just hope you are not going to request the use of MY shop for this project. My table saw sulks in the corner when it gets overly confused.
    george wilson,

    But George, you're the only person within hundreds of miles that has a full 136-piece set of beveled asymmetrical pinking joiners that are interior knurled - everybody else only has metric swagged fangling irons.

    I know what you mean about sulking table saws. I once had a bipolar drill press that refused to work on cloudy days or German cars.

    Alan Caro

  15. #15
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    Yes,but my proliferation of pinking joiners is covering up the hieroglyphic carved instructional top of my old kingdom granite CNC cart. The section covering phompoulgogasmasm(a real word) is totally obscured. I see that Google has insufficient erudition to produce the meaning of this word. With sufficient begging I will define it.
    Last edited by george wilson; 02-20-2014 at 9:27 AM.

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