Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: I know the wrong way now, what is the right way?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12

    I know the wrong way now, what is the right way?

    Hi All,

    I got an idea to build a small computer table using a double arch as the main structural element (see attached photo). So I assembled the arches with miter joints and #20 biscuits in cypress. The bottom of the arch will be tied together with a cross piece as will the top, but even so, I can see this design is poor..it will not support much
    weight reliably. I know I could reinforce things but then it will look ugly.. I would really like to maintain the simple double arch motif but am not sure how to build it so it is strong. Any suggestions?

    Thanks, Nikkiprotoarchs.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    20,413
    I'm going to offer . . . bent lamination.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    I'm going to offer . . . bent lamination.
    Thanks Glen- I can try that if I get access to a bandsaw. I was hoping there was some sort of joint I could cut for doing this in sections of sold wood, but when I look at this it seems there would be an awful lot of torque placed on the "middle pieces".

    Nicole

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    3,951
    End grain to end grain makes for a very weak glue joint. Multiple long dowels or mortise and tenons would produce a much stronger joint than the biscuits.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,231
    Another approach is bricklaying.

    bricklaying.jpg

    You glue up the structure from rectangular blocks. (Or nearly rectangular. You can trim the ends of the blocks so they butt together.) You can leave the structure as-built, or you can clean it up to get a smoother curve. You get lots of glue area, and no tricky joints to cut.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    mid-coast Maine and deep space
    Posts
    2,656
    Yes +1 to all the above. Biscuits are nothing more than temporary holds for the mock up (especially in this case). The laminated shape is how "everybody" does it but what's the fun in that ? I like the faceted idea. A challenging project. Dave's finger joint concept would be very strong. You could park anything on your desk. A more humble and workable solution is - I think - as Art suggests - "Multiple long dowels or mortise and tenons would produce a much stronger joint than the biscuits." Your frame stock looks thick enough (1" or more?) that even loose tenons like the Festool dominos would make a rugged joint. This is for a "small computer table" after all. Add a spreader rail in the bottom shape as well as at the top (right in the crook of the 2 lower joints) and you could build a "big" computer table this way as the rail would take up a lot of the tendency for the legs to splay out. This rail could be a dowel shape or just a flat board in a horizontal or vertical orientation re:to the legs sections or something more elaborate such as a T shape but I don't think it would need to be very stout to do the job.

    By the way - welcome to the Creek Nikki. Good luck with your project and keep posting. Just bough a new planer huh? What else do you have to work with?
    "... for when we become in heart completely poor, we at once are the treasurers & disbursers of enormous riches."
    WQJudge

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12
    Art that sounds good- those biscuits really are wimpy. This project is a dry run..so I can play with different strategies before moving from cypress to pecan. BTW there is some nice local wood here in Florida!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12
    Hi Jamie, that is very cool! Looks like the workflow would be cut the bricks, glue, bandsaw, then clean up. The thing that seems especially nice is the strength and that I can vary the thickness more than with a single layer

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12
    Sam thanks for your comments and encouragement I do plan to try and tie the top/bottom ends together with crosspieces and that will surely move me closer to a stronger structure. I will enjoy pondering whether to laminate, build with "bricks" or go with mortise/tenon or dowels. For now I will continue with the mock up as is, tie in the top and bottom, then load it up and see how much weight it will take to fail. I guess that will eliminate the guesswork Yes, I am now the happy owner of a Dewalt 734 planer. It is much easier on my arms than dressing rough stock with my jackplane. I just need to get stronger so I can heft it up to my workbench- Better yet I think I will put it on a stand. Otherwise I am mostly using hand tools with some nice chisels, japanese saws, and a router. The background of the pic I originally posted in this thread reveals my temporary table saw..a fold up piece of plywood with a circular saw bolted to it. Its dreadful and soon I will get myself a real saw. Thanks for the welcome to the Creek!
    Nikki

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •