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Thread: Inca planer/jointer combo machines - are they still worth their salt?

  1. #16
    Looks like you got a 510 model, which has the motor mounted below and a better drive mechanism for the planer function. It does have shorter jointer tables than the 550 or the 570 model. For $500 you got a very nice machine.

  2. #17
    Chris,
    That's interesting info. Here's a (bad) picture of the drive mechanism. You think it's a 510 model?

    BTW, I sent the same picture to Eagle to see if they have a belt as I'd like to have a spare.

    inca belt.jpg

  3. Yes, I believe it is a 510, the 550 (which is what I have) and 570 have the motor mounted directly to the back of the machine, not below it like yours. From what I have heard, the 510 has a more robust drive mechanism for the planer function. My 550 has the plastic gear that likes to strip out that everyone is talking about. I have even heard of some folks taking the longer tables from a 550 and putting them on a 510 because of the better drive gears. I will not part with my Inca j/p even if I move up to a larger combo machine.

  4. #19
    Join Date
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    I have a 570 and the motor trips the breaker in the planer mode (overload indicates a bearing failure).

    That's an additional $300 if you replace it with the same Leeson motor spec'd by Inca.
    As a jointer, they're excellent.

    As a planer, they're no better than the current crop of "lunchbox" machines available everywhere.
    Parts are readily available from Jesse at Eagle tools - but they won't come cheap.

    Bottom line - if you can't see it running, be prepared to replace the motor, at least.

    I'm retrofitting a basic 4-post Taiwanese 15" planer with a helical head instead of refitting the Inca as a planer.
    When they work, they're great.

    When they don't - it's a pretty boat anchor.

  5. #20
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    Steve, that picture confirms your is just like mine. Get a spare belt for insurance, but I doubt you'll need it for a very long time. I've replaced one in 25 years. And the planetary gear system is very durable - don't be scared off by anyone's comments otherwise on a different model. I think I've cleaned and greased the gears 2 or 3 times in 25 years and I've run many thousands of BF through the machine.

    John

  6. #21
    I'm not sure if the planetary gear design is typical as I've never really given much thought about how planers are designed, but I think it's a neat way to cut the RPM's down.

  7. #22
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    The 570 and 550 iterations had a side mounted motor with a simpler reduction gear mechanism.

    The 510 (undermount motor) had a much more robust, and complicated planetary gear mechanism.
    The 550/570 were notorious for melting the plastic pinion gear, when too much material was hogged off, during planing.

    I think the side mount motor was developed to avoid alignment problems, but it is a PITA to get on and off.
    The undermount motor with a single belt is straightforward.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Castle Rock, CO
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    I can't comment about the later models, but the model 510 I used to own was a terrific planer. I regret ever selling it. It had Tersa knives so knife change was a non issue. It terms of cut quality it was every bit the equal of the Felder Dual 51 I have now (cutter head width not withstanding). I wasn't quite as happy about its performance as a jointer due to the short tables and the requirement to use shims to level the outfeed table to the cutterhead and set it parallel to the infeed table.. It was easy to make a chip collection box that was effective in capturing the chips in either jointer or planer mode. Change over from one mode to the other was a matter of moments. It was important to keep the planer table waxed. Waxalit worked very well and is still available if you look hard enough or at least was within the last year. Failing that, I would suggest using Super-Gleit from Felder. It is a spray on liquid.

  9. #24
    Ok, so I finally took my first cut tonight.

    We have young kids (1yr old and 4yr old) so my free time is pretty limited. I used the waiting time to kind of scan over the machine and try to figure out how everything worked.

    As a jointer I'm very impressed so far. I'm still learning how to use it but it seems like as long as you can figure out where you're going wrong there's an adjustment to correct it. The adjustablility of the outfeed table is clever and appears to allow for pretty much any correction to counteract blade wear or warp of the workpiece.

    The blade guard is cool; they put some serious engineering into it. It feels pretty tight though, I wanted to loosen it up but the sockets on the hex screws are epoxied shut which is the Europeans' way of saying it doesn't need adjustment (and I mean that in a good way), but it just doesn't feel right. I'd appreciate if you guys could comment on your experiences with this assembly.


    As a planer I haven't had enough time to play around with it, however; so far I still wouldn't trade my spiral cutterhead lunchbox for it.


    Sorry if this is a bit boring to some, but I find machine design fascinating and was thinking there were others on here who might like to get into the details as well.

    Oh and by the way I did join that Yahoo usergroup which I'm just starting to check out.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Matthews View Post
    I have a 570 and the motor trips the breaker in the planer mode (overload indicates a bearing failure).

    That's an additional $300 if you replace it with the same Leeson motor spec'd by Inca.
    As a jointer, they're excellent.

    As a planer, they're no better than the current crop of "lunchbox" machines available everywhere.
    Parts are readily available from Jesse at Eagle tools - but they won't come cheap.

    Bottom line - if you can't see it running, be prepared to replace the motor, at least.

    I'm retrofitting a basic 4-post Taiwanese 15" planer with a helical head instead of refitting the Inca as a planer.
    When they work, they're great.

    When they don't - it's a pretty boat anchor.
    I've had a 570, I'm the third owner, for a number of years. I don't agree with this assessment at all. Leeson motors are quite good. The only comment u would make is that its not a good machine for hogging off lots of wood. It is a machine with the finesse to produce a precise thickness, for musical instruments, for example If I need to hog off 1/4 inch of wood I start with my regular planer. When I 'm close or want to surface the piece, pop it into the Inca.

  11. #26
    Hey I know this is an old thread but I was wondering if you guys could tell me if you think this is a good deal. I donít have much experience with jointers and have never heard of Inca before.

    https://columbus.craigslist.org/tls/...795109165.html

  12. #27
    I don't know what these planners are worth but I have the 8 5/8 inch model. I do not like the manual feed of the planner mode and do not use it. I bought an old Ryobi AP-10 lunchbox planner and use that instead for planning. Even when waxed, it took a lot of effort to feed wood through my planner attachment. The jointer function works fine.

  13. #28
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    IMHO, yes, it is worth $600, or more, as long as it runs OK. That is one of the later models with a side mounted motor. I actually preferred my older, belt drive motor because it takes up less floor area, but this is a newer machine. He has the owner's manual, an extra set of knives, and the knife setting device, too, and the machine looks to have been well cared for. If that size machine fits your needs I doubt you would be disappointed. I was very happy with mine for 25 years.

    John

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clay McElwee View Post
    Hey I know this is an old thread but I was wondering if you guys could tell me if you think this is a good deal. I don’t have much experience with jointers and have never heard of Inca before.

    https://columbus.craigslist.org/tls/...795109165.html
    Looks like market rate for this area; not sure what Columbus prices have been like.
    If you're interested, go over and see how it works and if you like it.

    Give it a long thought if it isn't working well in its current state.
    As mentioned earlier in thread, Eagle Tools in LA might have some bits and pieces from when they bought up spare parts years back.
    Note that the Inca website is back up, and may also be a source for some components.

    Matt

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