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Thread: japanese tansu - mystery groove in carcass?

  1. #1
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    japanese tansu - mystery groove in carcass?

    Can someone identify the purpose of the groove that appears on the right hand side of the top carcass panel, in from the edge, further from the two squares?

    mystery groove2.jpg

    It seems like the little squares are to key in the front of the horizontal drawer dividers. The vertical groove isn't cut off by the drawer dividers, which makes me think it is for a locking mechanism of some sort:


    mystery groove.jpg

    If this is the case, anybody know how the locking mechanism works?

    -jamie
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  2. #2
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    Here's the video... these screen captures are from the third video clip in the series.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85Gr...e=results_main
    Last edited by jamie shard; 01-13-2013 at 8:36 AM.
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  3. #3
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    Maybe something like a drawer stop?

    drawer stops maybe.jpg

    Little pegs are visible on the left hand side, but these wouldn't work with the way the drawers are designed in the video (no cutout on sides).

    I'm stumped.
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  4. #4
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    If you look at 28 seconds into the 6th video, when he has the cabinet in his drying closet for the finish, you can see the pegs have been cut flush. Could the function of the pegs be to help hold the drawer shelves in place?

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    Good catch! That makes sense... but do you see them on the other side? I don't, but I'll look some more...
    Last edited by jamie shard; 01-13-2013 at 3:47 PM.
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  6. #6
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    Interesting, too, that the bottom carcass panel doesn't appear to be mechanically jointed together in a way that would keep the bottom edges from moving outward.
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  7. #7
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    Is it possible that the groove is a mistake? It doesn't seem necessary from a functional perspective. It's a lot of work for a redundant drawer shelf stop. Anybody else have an insight?
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  8. #8
    I agree that the groove is for a locking mechanism to keep the drawer deviders (or whatever you call the horizontal slats that go between the drawers) locked in place.

    After partially assembling the carcass a strip of wood would be slid into the groove, assuring that the drawer dividers don't move around in their dados. I suppose its a similar concept of a stopped dado. You can see in 2nd pic of the first post, that there are little cut outs in the dividers that line up with the groove. Once a strip of wood was put into the groove, I would assume that he would have to chisel out the part that would impede the drawer from being put in place (I don't think they are drawer stops because it appears that this groove is on the front side of the cabinet, but I could be wrong, in fact I could be wrong about all of this!)

    Jonas

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    Is it possible he has the drawers fit so tightly that he needs to vent the air out to allow the drawers to close quickly? In video five at the 3:00 min. mark you can see one drawer being closed creating enough air pressure to push out the drawer above.

  10. #10
    Harlan you win the golden egg. Yes the vert groove is to allow air flow as to not open all the drawers as any single drawer is slid in. The drawers typically made of sugi or paulonia are exceptionally light with side and back parts that are only about 12mm thick. The drawers are all finely fitted, and with out the grooves no way for the air to move from the cavity behind it.
    Pax

  11. #11
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    Good to see this thread alive again! I checked with some other folks and they all thought it was an air vent. Oh well, I was hoping for a secret door mechanism, but until I hear a convincing counter argument, the "air vent" hypothesis seems to be the winner. Correy out of curiousity, is this your personal opinion or are you aware of some other authority/reference?
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  12. #12
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    Reviving my old thread...

    I no longer think it's an air vent. If it was, the vent would be in the back of the drawer, not near the front.

    I no longer think it's for pinning the drawer blades in place. That's what the two square mortises at the front of the drawer blades are for.

    Any other ideas?

    -jamie
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  13. #13
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    Itís for a drawer stop you can see it at 2:23 in video 3/6.

    Venting the air behind the drawer below/above would drive the user nuts.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

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    Brian, could you explain how a drawer stop would work with these kinds of drawers?
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  15. #15
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    I’m not sure how to answer, can you further explain your question?
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