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Thread: Hand scraped texture, best method?

  1. #1
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    Hand scraped texture, best method?

    I have a possible commission where the person wants a dining table with a slight hand scraped texture. What is the best/most effective method for this? A scrub plane has the radius, but is much more aggressive than what I think I would want. Maybe buying a blade for my smoother plane and radiusing it? My concern is also tearout, and ways to avoid this.

    My first instinct is to go hand work, it shouldn't be too big of a table that I couldn't do it by hand, even if it is laborious.

    It needs to be a subtle scrape, but even if the initial scalloping is too aggressive, I can always sand it down some to slightly smooth the texture.

    Thoughts/Suggestions/Methods?

    Thanks in advance.
    Grady - "Thelma, we found Dean's finger"
    Thelma - "Where is the rest of him?!"

  2. #2
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    Which species of wood will the top be?
    If not too complex a gran pattern I might think of using a curved hand scrapper.
    Alternating from large curve to small (think of the re-curve of a cello top only
    with straight lines)

  3. #3
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    Scraper and plane finish is what ya make of it. A well tuned #5 or #5 1/2 with a cambered iron (well sharpened) can give ya the surface. Same can be done with a #4. The "agressive" mention is relative to the exposure of the blade and the opening of the mouth.
    A scraper with a radius/camber ground edge will do the same.
    Scrape/plane and sand will yield the surface you desire.
    What wood are you considering?
    Bill
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

  4. #4
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    I'd use a good sharp hand scraper. Don't use sandpaper. A good eye can see the difference between the scraped parts and the sanded parts.

  5. #5
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    Wood species is yet to be determined. It is a replication of a table his parents have. I've aksed him to get me some better pixs of the grain so I can determine better what species it is. I realize certain woods such as mahogany and cherry will behave better for this than maple or oaks. I will judt have to see how the woods behave.
    Grady - "Thelma, we found Dean's finger"
    Thelma - "Where is the rest of him?!"

  6. #6
    This is a great time to get and learn how to use a cabinet scraper. It's basically a card scraper in a handled&soled body. Thumbscrews provide flex and camber to the blade. It will give you a slightly scalloped and ready-for-finish surface (provided you hone the edge as well as your smoother's blade.)

    A card scraper will also do the job, but you are asking for sore thumbs with that.

    A well tuned cabinet scraper will perform well on all kinds of gnarl.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex grams View Post
    I have a possible commission where the person wants a dining table with a slight hand scraped texture.

    Thoughts/Suggestions/Methods?
    Best method to create a hand scraped texture?

    Umm... hand scraping?

    (in all serious though - for sure this is the way to go. Whether hand held scraper or a holder or cab scraper). There was a guy over in the neander section that was loaning out a large LN scraper plane for people to try, you might get in line on that one.....

  8. #8
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    scrub plane - - real light passes. If necessary, re grind the blade to the radius you desire.

    Russ

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Beckett View Post
    Best method to create a hand scraped texture?

    Umm... hand scraping?

    (in all serious though - for sure this is the way to go. Whether hand held scraper or a holder or cab scraper). There was a guy over in the neander section that was loaning out a large LN scraper plane for people to try, you might get in line on that one.....
    +1 for scraping.
    At first thought I would say card scrapers, but as Prashun said: "sore thumbs" are a sure thing with a large project. A Stanley #12 (mine is a 12 1/2) Scraper or a 112 Scraper Plane don't bow the blade so you won't get the pattern it sounds like they are looking for. A #80 though does bow the blade with a screw and would be my suggestion. A #5 plane, or even better a 5 1/2 because it's larger, would probably work but wouldn't be a subtle as a scraper. Of course without a photo, maybe less subtle is what they want. I think a scrub plane (#40) would probably be too course, unless they want troughs in the top. Besides a scrub plane is so small you might prefer those sore thumbs.
    "I've cut the dang thing three times and it's STILL too darn short"
    Name withheld to protect the guilty

    Stew Hagerty

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by russell lusthaus View Post
    scrub plane - - real light passes. If necessary, re grind the blade to the radius you desire.

    Russ
    Scrub plane is the way to go. I have done this on a few projects. If there is any doubt as to what the customer is looking for, make up some samples.

  11. #11
    I've seen where people use sandblasting, wire brushes, peices of chain, peices of rope with bolts and other object threaded through the rope, etc. I don't know much about it, but there are a whole bunch of techniques for many different effects. Maybe a trip to the library or book store?

  12. #12
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    I'm a bit naive here. What's the attraction of a "hand scrapped" look? Is there a historic or heritage aspect to this?
    Scott Vroom

    I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.

  13. #13
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    Stanley box scraper works decent.

  14. #14
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    I doubt scraping will give you noticeable texture. In fact, scraping is usually done to remove texture. I have used a no. 3 hand plane with a slightly cambered blade. Keep it very sharp to avoid tear out. Above all, make samples first.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Harlan Barnhart View Post
    I doubt scraping will give you noticeable texture. In fact, scraping is usually done to remove texture. I have used a no. 3 hand plane with a slightly cambered blade. Keep it very sharp to avoid tear out. Above all, make samples first.
    Maybe a paint scraper would give a good texture.

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