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Thread: Transferring/copying an image to a bowl

  1. #1
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    Transferring/copying an image to a bowl

    I have seen bowls with birds and flowers and I would like to know if there is a way to transfer a picture or an image to a sphere surface. I pretty much can do it with carbon paper on something with one dimension flat. I'm looking for ideas
    Fred

  2. #2
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    Dec 2010
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    Fred, I do carbon paper transfers and find that if I tape my drawing top & bottom, slide the carbon paper beneath and draw the design top to bottom (or reverse) then tape the pattern
    on the left & right side then remove the previous taped pieces. Draw in the design left to right (or reverse) then peek as to how much is left to transfer I can then fill-in the remaining
    rest of the pattern by "fudging" a little bit. I then remove the tracing/carbon paper and check whats missing or wrong with my design. I then fill-in the blanks or erase and fill-in with
    pencil marks. It's difficult to wrap a piece of velum or onion skin drawing paper around a compound surface (as you already know) but this works for me. Hope this helps.
    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is probably not for you

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  3. #3
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    Jim thanks a lot, sounds like that will work. I was hoping for an easy answer, sometimes there isn't one. I see Lee Valley has a projector but I imagine that it would introduce a lot of distortion.
    Fred

  4. #4
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    I have heard of using a computer print out (has to be laser, ink-jet will not work) taped to the work piece. The technique calls for rubbing a xylene pen over the surface thus transferring the image. Have never tried it.
    Regards,

    Glen

    Woodworking: It's a joinery.

  5. #5
    Fred
    Not sure what your going to do after the transfer. I been trying some low relief and I'm using gun stock carvers way to transfer. Get computer printer paper thats clear and self stick. You copy your pattern then seal the middle 1" or 2" to the bowl, then I use my deramel with very small bit and cut through the clear plastic and the wood then go another couple inches ether way and do the same. I only do the main lines and then just free hand the smaller stuff.Your pattern is cut into the wood just a little but you'll be surprised how well this works if your carving the bowl.
    Hope this helps.
    Comments and Constructive Criticism Welcome

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  6. #6
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    Fred - Here is a narrative on the xylene technique.

    http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load...138598288.html
    Regards,

    Glen

    Woodworking: It's a joinery.

  7. #7
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    I use wax free graphite paper instead of carbon paper. Wax free graphite can be erased. Xylene works well for simple line drawing, but not so much for a complex pattern. If you are burning, I would stick with the graphite. I don't like chemicals in the wood when I burn. You will get some distortion when transferring to a complex curve. I always do free hand corrections prior to burning. You can also slice the image to help it lay better.
    Owner: Silver Knight Studios
    Vice President Illiana Woodturners

  8. #8
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    I do like Jeff and use wax free graphite paper. I also like the fact it can be erased.
    Bernie

    Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.



  9. #9
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    Thanks for the great information. I will probably skip the xylene for now, thanks for that link. I don't know if I can find graphite paper around here, had to get the carbon paper I have from Charleston (hour and half drive). I plan on going simple for now till I see how it goes. I am going to try burning for now, may try the carving later.
    Last edited by Fred Belknap; 09-04-2012 at 10:32 PM.
    Fred

  10. #10
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    You can get the graphite paper at Michaels or Hobby Lobby. I am sure you can order it from Amazon. You can make your own by using the side of a pencil and covering the back of your pattern.

    If you are doing something simple, you can also make a pattern out of card stock and trace it. It works well for repeatable patterns or when working on curves.
    Owner: Silver Knight Studios
    Vice President Illiana Woodturners

  11. #11
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    Dec 2010
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    Dexter, MO
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    Fred. all of the above are good ways to do the transfer. I use carbon sheets from my bank deposit slips. Most everyone has access to those
    and the carbon marks are easily erased with a Ruby Red eraser from Wallyworld. Jeff M. uses card stock for a pattern, I use clear acetate stock
    from bubble pack stuff for patterns. It's clear and easy to see thru, helps in positioning. These are also very available, just look at what the wife
    buys at the grocery store next time....strawberries come to mind!!
    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is probably not for you

    Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass,
    But rather learning to dance in the rain

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