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Thread: suggestions for matching existing cabinets

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Tomball, TX (30 miles NNW Houston)
    Posts
    2,747
    I would not suggest spraying that large an area with rattle cans. Nor would spraying that much lacquer or varnish from rattle cans be cost effective. A quart of varnish will finish 45 sq ft. and cost much less than $100. You could wipe on the varnish or brush the first 2 coats then sand and wipe the last 3 coats (equivelent of 1 brush on coat). I only recommend poly on floors; where it belongs. There are much better varnish available that are harder than poly which is tough not hard. If you want brand names Behlens, Waterlox, Pratt & Lambert #38, Sherwin Williams classic Fast Dry Oil Varnish.

    Spraying varnish requires personal protection and covering anything within 20 feet of the spray area. The slow drying varnish will float everwhere and makes a sticky mess on all your tools. Spraying lacquer is not as bad for the overspray, (it is dry by the time it gets to thetable saw) but the fumes are much worse. Even the chance of a loud BOOM is increased with lacquer.

    If i where doing this joj I most likely would not be spraying... too long to clean my spray equipment... also my A-A Airless uses almost a quart of finish to get the finish to the gun. Therefore this is too small for my spray rig.
    Last edited by Scott Holmes; 05-02-2012 at 5:49 PM.
    Scott

    Finishing is an 'Art & a Science'. Actually, it is a process. You must understand the properties and tendencies of the finish you are using. You must know the proper steps and techniques, then you must execute them properly.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Presently in Knoxville TN.
    Posts
    361
    Hmmmm... well, it looks like me and Scott are having problems with definitions of late. "hardness" like "curing" are subjective term, in which using them one must know that type of either, which is being spoke of, is being referred to. Since this is a matter for a new thread on such topics, i will disregard it for now.

    However, to make a blanket statement that a particular resin coating is only good for a singular purpose, is more of a personal opinion than one of chemistry. I can assure you that urethane's can be just as hard or harder than any natural resin or most synthetic resins out there. Though I'm not stating that the fast dry is such as one of them,

    In your case Zahid, i still have a few questions the main of course being if your paneling is already installed? If not, or it is up in such away to be fairly easily removed and reinstalled, you can always do the bulk of the finishing outside if the weather permits. As to whatever information given here you personally decide to use or go by, is your decision to go forward with, any choices recommended either of material or application parameters will get you where you need to go ok?
    Last edited by sheldon pettit; 05-02-2012 at 9:21 PM.
    Sincerely,

    S.Q.P - SAM - CHEMMY.......... Almost 50 years in this art and trade and counting...

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Plano, TX
    Posts
    2,041
    Nothing is installed, I have a sheet of plywood waiting to be cut and joined. I learned a long time ago to finish everything before glue up. So all stain and top coat work will be done pre-assembly and in the garage. I have actually used Polyurethane on a bookshelf for kids, it was almost 6-7 yrs ago (my first usable project), it's holding very well still. I am not averse to Poly just wanted to match what is already present, plus I like the fact that I can repair the lacquer so easily, poly is pretty much strip and re-apply.
    The means by which an end is reached must exemplify the value of the end itself.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Presently in Knoxville TN.
    Posts
    361
    Quote Originally Posted by Zahid Naqvi View Post
    Nothing is installed, I have a sheet of plywood waiting to be cut and joined. I learned a long time ago to finish everything before glue up. So all stain and top coat work will be done pre-assembly and in the garage. I have actually used Polyurethane on a bookshelf for kids, it was almost 6-7 yrs ago (my first usable project), it's holding very well still. I am not averse to Poly just wanted to match what is already present, plus I like the fact that I can repair the lacquer so easily, poly is pretty much strip and re-apply.

    Can't argue with you on that, only shellac is easier to repair than lacquer

    Glad to know of your previous expiereince Zahid, it's always better if you can finish something like this before installation and without doing it in the house

    So lacquer it is, post pics when done oOh, do keep in mind that as lacquer ages it will yellow, so there will always will be some difference in appearences. By lacquer i mean nitro lacquer.
    Last edited by sheldon pettit; 05-02-2012 at 10:42 PM.
    Sincerely,

    S.Q.P - SAM - CHEMMY.......... Almost 50 years in this art and trade and counting...

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