Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 25 of 25

Thread: Miter Saw Accuracy

  1. #16
    I just purchased a Dewalt dws780 after an exhaustive search to replace my old Ridgid. I use it in my shop to do all of my 45's on cabinet door frames. I is dead on, right out of the box. Very impressive. One thing though, Do Not expect good results with the blade that comes with the saw. Put a proper crosscut blade on it, and it will not let you down. This is the most often used machine in my full time cabinetmaking business.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Westfield IN
    Posts
    38
    I disposed of all my 'disposable' consumer type miter saws years ago. Bought a CTD steel and iron saw. Not a slider, so that inaccuracy is lost along with some capacity. But the accuracy for miters is excellent. Set it and hold it. One cut or a thousand.

    Bosch, DeWalt, Hitachi, Makita, etc. They are all in that same class. Festool may be better. I will confess to having a nice old Bosch in the shop for the odd tall or wide cut s we may need to make. But it is stored under the bench, unplugged - a sure sign or infrequent use.

    The CTD saw (similar to an Omga) is cast iron, Baldor motor, common pivot bearings, off the shelf switch....is engineered to last forever, with just two wear points.

    But, if you are square cutting to length, a good sled will be better and faster. We just got a Hunter miter fence that has all sorts of great features. That may be all you need.
    I want to stay as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all kinds of things you can't see from the center.
    - Kurt Vonnegut

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    382
    Holy cow this thread is 9 years old you guys are commenting on.

    With that said, inaccurate readings is why I no longer own a miter saw. I don't know why they cant make a decent saw that does not cost $1500.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kapolei Hawaii
    Posts
    3,097
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Mayer View Post
    Holy cow this thread is 9 years old you guys are commenting on.

    With that said, inaccurate readings is why I no longer own a miter saw. I don't know why they cant make a decent saw that does not cost $1500.
    Lol! I wonder if the OP had his question answered.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
    Posts
    3,910
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Mayer View Post
    Holy cow this thread is 9 years old you guys are commenting on.

    With that said, inaccurate readings is why I no longer own a miter saw. I don't know why they cant make a decent saw that does not cost $1500.
    Lol, I completely missed that!

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Central Michigan
    Posts
    1,431
    I saw that the thread is old but it turned new again with updated questions..
    Richard Poitras
    Central, Michigan....
    01-02-2006


  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    15,308
    Sometimes old threads pop up now and then due to folks searching on particular topics. It is usually better to start a new topic.
    Wood: a fickle medium....

    Did you know SMC is user supported? Please help.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fairbanks AK
    Posts
    373
    I find with my sliding miter saw the faster I jam the blade through the cut, the lest precise the angle is. Thicker blade better. A sliding miter saw is not, in my experience, a precision instrument. Frame up an octaganal gazebo, sure. Eight sided clock face, not the right tool for the job.

  9. #24
    An excellent tool for miters is the Veritas Shooting Sander by Lee Valley - you can also make your own

    Picture framers use a hand powered disc sander which is quite precise but expensive - AMP Disc Sander

    Any shooting board or jig you make should have a 2 layer fence so to adjust it you can loosen screws and shim a little for accuracy -:I like playing cards for shims

    If you are making a shaped profile moulding which can't be turned on it's back you will need both left hand and right hand shooting boards

    Miters are fun!

  10. #25
    I recall seeing sandpaper glued to an old saw blade in a tabkesaw and miters sanded using miter gauge or a jig against the side of the blade

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •