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Thread: Long anticipated Mini Glaser gloat/review

  1. #1
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    Long anticipated Mini Glaser gloat/review

    I think I've been more excited about these tools than I was for my lathe way back when. Upon opening the box, I found a very sturdy canvas case to hold each tool in a dedicated pocket. To some you may think what for but for me, I have a lathe at work and one at home now. The first time I had to take an arm full of tools to work to make some table legs, I found it very hard to carry all those tools. Now I can just roll them up and off I go wheather it's across the shop to sharpen or across town to go to my business. My other concern was going to be how tight the fit was of the tool into the handle. What I found is, a very tight fit but not so tight as to be difficult. It actually has a slight vacuum pop when I pull the tool out of the handle. As a matter of fact, I can change a tool in about 1 second. No allan head to hunt down and no more time than grabbing another tool off the rack. When it comes to the quality of the tools, the only thing I could to think of to compair them to would be a surgical instrument. The attention to detail and the quality of the materials are something you really need to hold in your hands to appreciate. I can't think of any other tools I own that even come close. The feel of the tool in my hand feels very comfortible and extremely well balanced. Now I need to get on the glue up for my next segmented turning. I plan on using these to do the entire build. So far I can say that these are built to the highest quality one could expect. Another concern I've heard and that I also had, is the size of the tools. What I realized though is, the weighted handle and the rock solid metal that the tools themselves are made of, are just as heavy or heavier that my wood handled full size tools. Of course the proof will be in the use of the tools themselves so stay tuned. I'll be starting the glue up for my next turning tonight. Should be on the lathe this weekend. I'll have more pics soon too.


    Last edited by Bill Wyko; 12-13-2011 at 5:07 PM.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  2. #2
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    Very cool and congratulations on having them! I look forward to your report. One of these days I'm gonna be able to upgrade some of my tools and these are certainly on the radar!

  3. #3
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    Actually I just talked to Paulo, he's going to release smaller sets to build on too. What's cool is, we just talked about this on a post last week and he's already on it. A company that actually listens to its product users, what a concept.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  4. #4
    Bill, what is the length of the handle in that set? Thanks
    -------
    No, it's not thin enough yet.
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  5. #5
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    Here is a size comparison. The wood handled tool is crown parting tool. it weighs 8.0 ounces. The Glaser weighs 1lb 1 ounce. over twice as heavy as the wood handled tool. This should translate into a little tool working like a big tool. Needless to say, I can't wait to get on the lathe. The handle is a little over 8-1/2 inches by itself. Overal length will vary slightly depending on the tool inserted in it.
    Last edited by Bill Wyko; 12-13-2011 at 5:03 PM.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  6. #6
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    I'm interested to hear your impressions after using them, Bill. I could be wrong, but that handle seems to be on the short side for my tastes generally. I would imagine that Paulo could be persuaded to incorporate the cam lock mechanism into a longer handle... 16 inches would be more to my liking. I may be wrong, but I think there is a larger version in the works... 'synergy' or something like that? No doubt you've got a great set of tools there, but I'm afraid I'd find myself wanting for a longer handle. I'm looking forward to seeing your next project... I seem to recall that it was gonna have something like 9.5 million pieces!

  7. #7
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    The one with a bazillion pieces won't be started until after the first of the year. I'm still doing the math for the patterns right now. As far as the handle goes, it's about the same size as 1/2 the tools I've used to make everything I have ever done. Plus the weighted handle makes it a wholw different tool in your hand. I think pictures don't do it justice. You can bet as soon as the Synergy are available I'll be on it. With segmenting I really don't need a long reach because the pieces are turned in 1/2's top & bottom. When I need to go deep I have a Keith Clark Hollowing system. I rarely ever need it though. I can use my 15V or my Crown/Elsworth. I'm still finishing up a humidor right now. All I have to do is some touch up on the underside of the lid and it all goes together. Unfortunately it's been raining for days here so I can't spray any finish. Good news though is that I can start another turning. As Budwiser says "Here we go!"
    Last edited by Bill Wyko; 12-13-2011 at 6:39 PM.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  8. #8
    Bill, there were some profiles in there I couldn't identify, but was able to see the list from the website. Very nice looking set! I look forward to a full report.

  9. #9
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    Thanks John. They are going to get a torture test. I just dug up a piece of Ironwood. Most tool would shake in their boots. Lets see if they're up to the test. I'll try to turn a piece of it tonight. I've been pretty sick with a respiratory problem the last few days and its been raining cats & dogs so not sure what I can get done. I'll take better pictures of the profiles asap.
    Last edited by Bill Wyko; 12-13-2011 at 7:40 PM.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  10. #10
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    Congratulations and good luck with the new tools. They look beautiful and I have a hunch thay will perform as good as they look. I own a few of Paulo's tools and I couldn't be happier with them. I think you will find that handle to be sure to grip and very comfortable and if not, my experience with their company tells me Glaser will do whatever is necessary to make it right for you. Get that math done so we can see the results and hear about the experience.
    faust

  11. #11
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    Great gloat. Let us know how great they work!

  12. #12
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    Well, I wanted to do some Ironwood but I had no tenons made and I've been pretty sick for days. But I had to turn something, I looked around the shop and found a roughed out, very punky turning made of Quilted Maple. I had roughed the outside of this blank about a year ago. It was still solid though. BTW the first thing I do with all new tools is sharpen them on the wet sharpener. Once I started turning with the oval bowl gouge it took about 2 minutes to get a feel for it when I realized, this tool has Napoleon syndrome. It's little...but it doesn't know it's little LMAO. This thing was cutting and working just as if it were 2 feet long. I then used a detail gouge and a round nose scraper to do the entire piece. Something else I realized was that I could use it with one hand, I had to remind myself to keep 2 hands on it anyway. One more thing I was happy to find as well was that it was very easy to do delicate cuts which almost eliminated the checking this piece of wood had been shelved for in the first place. Bottom line is, these tools worked beautifully and are down right fun to use. BTW I was able to turn down to an 1/8 inch just like I do with my bigger tools. I need to vacuum chuck it tonight and turn the bottom a bit but I should be posting it tomorrow. All in all, I think they are a great investment. I'll probably use them every bit as much as my bigger tools. They're just really fun to use.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  13. #13
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    I forgot to bring a very important feature to my posts. Probably one of the most important features too.......The handle won't roll away!!!! I can't tell you how many times I've set other round handled tools on the lathe bed and they just sit there.....until you look away and they roll off and just out of reach. Then you turn everything off and go under the lathe to get it. LMAO A small, simple feature with a huge purpose.
    Last edited by Bill Wyko; 12-14-2011 at 6:09 PM.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  14. #14
    Great looking set of tools, Bill. I have my eye on a set. I don't turn much small scale stuff. Is this set strickly for small turnings or can it handle some larger turnings?
    "My favorite piece is my last one, my best piece is my next one."

  15. #15
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    Thanks Joe, The first thing I turned is about 7.5 inches in diameter and it really worked well. It's posted here too. IMHO if you can get the tool rest in the proper place and you're in no danger of the handle contacting the up side of the turning, I think they can be used in ways bigger tools can't be used. I actually felt comfortable using the tools one handed, then I reminded myself that that's not a good practice. So I put my other hand on it anyway. I was also surprised that I could reach out past the tool rest about 2 to 2-1/2 inches. Again, not something I would make a habit of but if needed I still felt comfortable. I think it really has to do with the weighted handle and the fact that they really holds their sharp edge. I had mentioned before that they seem to have what I call "Napoleon Syndrome" They really have a lot of characteristics you would find in bigger tools in a very compact size. Let me know if you get a set, I'd like your opinion as well.
    Last edited by Bill Wyko; 12-16-2011 at 4:25 PM.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

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