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Thread: Staining Corian

  1. #16
    So yesterday I put a small ring of white Corian in a red dye. It is slightly pink but the dye as has been suggested is only into the fine sanding scratches. At the end of the day I put a small piece of 1/2 think white Corian in the same dye and today I removed it and cut it in half revealing that no dye actually penetrated the Corian. Sure there is some surface colouring but that's it. Just verifying in my own way what all the experts here have already told us.
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Hayes, Virginia
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    Been thinking about this and a very long time ago we used to put our safety glasses in a pot of water, add colored dye and turn on the heat. There was a time when it was common to see people with safety glasses of every imaginable color and the dye was not just on the surface it sublimated into the plastic . I wonder if its possible to use this technique with Corian?

    I dye sublimate Corian all of the time so I know the colors are not just on the surface. I use a heat press for sublimation, never thought about using clothing dye and boiling water. The pictures below are all dye-sublimated Corian and the color is one to three thousandths of an inch deep. This technique is to expensive for background coloring but it proves that heat might make using colored dye work.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Keith Outten; 03-25-2020 at 10:55 AM.

  3. #18
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    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
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    Peter, why don't you repeat your test and this time add some Ritz Dye from the grocery store, water and heat. You have to get the temperature hot enough to soften the plastic but not melt it.

  4. #19
    I may have done something wrong but yesterday I boiled a small white piece in some red water based dye and then sanded it a bit and the dye did not penetrate. I only boiled it for a few minutes though.
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
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    Peter,

    I'm thinking again. I dye-sub Corian at 320 degrees F for 20 minutes. The dye won't transfer until the Corian gets soft and I guess you can't obtain the required heat with open boiling water. My Bad.

  6. #21
    sooo, I'm no chemist although some of my friends do refer to me as the Mad Scientist. If I put a piece of corian in water and boil it I thought that it would only go to 212 f or 100 c? If this is not hot enough to soften the Corian how then should I get extra heat?
    My wife doesn't like me experimenting in the house so I will be forced to use a counter top oven or microwave oven in my workshop. I am interested in this process because I would like to dye corian finger rings. So I only would need to do this to quite small reshaped pieces of Corian.
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
    Posts
    1,570
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Blair View Post
    sooo, I'm no chemist although some of my friends do refer to me as the Mad Scientist. If I put a piece of corian in water and boil it I thought that it would only go to 212 f or 100 c? If this is not hot enough to soften the Corian how then should I get extra heat?
    My wife doesn't like me experimenting in the house so I will be forced to use a counter top oven or microwave oven in my workshop. I am interested in this process because I would like to dye corian finger rings. So I only would need to do this to quite small reshaped pieces of Corian.
    Use a pressure cooker. Maybe The Boss has one in a cupboard?

    As pressure rises, the boiling point of water increases. Didn't read back, so not sure what temp you need, but I vaguely recall my Mom's cooker had a reference label on it; temperature vs the size of weight on the vent...?
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    4,007
    I would try iodine. I have used it to stain pine to match old yellowed wood. Cheap and easy to try if you already have a spare drop. I wonder if it is sold out these days? Urine?
    Bil lD

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