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Thread: LN Bronze Beading Tool

  1. #1
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    LN Bronze Beading Tool

    Hello,

    I'm considering the Lie-Nielsen Bronze Beading Tool. I'd like to hear feedback from owners before I drop $175 on one.

    Thanks!

    Ben
    My blog: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/blog.php?70802-Ben-Arnott

  2. #2
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    On most everything, I've heard people say that either they find their veritas tools to be equal, or even superior to the LN. The Lee Valley beading tool is much more affordable.

  3. #3

    LN beading tool

    This is one of the first LN tools that I purchased because I thought that the idea of scraping a profile was neat - and it is!

    This tool doesn't see daily or even monthly use but I have scraped 100s of feet with it over the years. I can recommend it. It works well, is a treat to handle and a pleasure to look at.

    Get some tool blanks when you order the scraper and you can make your own profiles as needed.

    Performance is improved by lapping the faces of the cutters.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Arnott View Post
    Hello,

    I'm considering the Lie-Nielsen Bronze Beading Tool. I'd like to hear feedback from owners before I drop $175 on one.

    Thanks!

    Ben
    I don't own one, but I did use it at the Tool Event that I went to. It was great to use. Comfortable, and well designed (though Stanley actually gets the kudos for that, I believe). While I believe that LN tools are worth every penny, I don't have many pennies so for now, I use a homemade scratch stock and make my own profiles from an old sawblade: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?148188-My-Scratch-Stock-Design

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Lindberry View Post
    I don't own one, but I did use it at the Tool Event that I went to. It was great to use. Comfortable, and well designed (though Stanley actually gets the kudos for that, I believe). While I believe that LN tools are worth every penny, I don't have many pennies so for now, I use a homemade scratch stock and make my own profiles from an old sawblade: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?148188-My-Scratch-Stock-Design
    Thanks for the link Roy. Your scratch stock looks very cool. Excellent alternative.

    Chris, Thanks for the feedback. I own a number of LN Tools and have nothing bad to say about them at all. I was kind of expecting positive ratings, but thought I'd ask anyway.
    My blog: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/blog.php?70802-Ben-Arnott

  6. #6
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    The beading tool seems like one of the coolest looking yet most superfluous tools they make. If I had one in my shop I'd keep it (guilty...I hoard tools), but can't bring myself to drop the $$ on it since the same thing can be accomplished so easily with a shop-made tool from scrap. Your $, your decision.
    Mark Maleski

  7. #7
    Mark put it well. I have one because at the time I didn't want to grind a couple cutters. The LV has gotten good reviews.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Ben,

    It might help to focus on the kinds of furniture pieces you want to build as a guide to acquiring the tools. For example, I like to carve and I only buy chisels as I need them for a project. The wisdom of that becomes apparent when you have to buy and then properly store the tools. Even more so, if you ever have to do a big move.

    I have a cheaper scratch stock for beading and it does the job, but if needed to make beads more extensively, it would sway me to either use a beading plane or to opt for the LN or LV beading tool. Food for thought.

    Jim

  10. #10
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    I much prefer the original Stanley version of the beader. It's castings are virtually the same but cast iron, and L-N cutters fit the original Stanley. I don't know if it is still true, but the L-N I used to put 5 beaded and reeded grooves on each of 4 mahogany legs left dark bronze in the surface between the channels. This was an early model, before they moved the Lie Nielsen name so the screws on the fences missed them. The cast iron Stanley didn't of course when I used it on another set of legs. You can probably find a good Stanley 66 on Ebay for a bit over $100. Whether it has cutters isn't to big a deal since the L-N cutters ($56) fit. But you do want the fences, though they can also be bought from L-N. There is a straight fence and a curved fence. I think the 66s are pretty readily available.

  11. #11
    I own the LV beading tool and have not had the opportunity to use LN's. I chose LV over LN because the design looked to bee more comfortable with the knob instead of the second handle. Also the price difference played a role in my decision.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the feedback everyone. I especially enjoyed the video on YouTube. I forgot to look and see if LN had made one for the beading tool. I'll keep my eyes out for a Stanley 66, but I think I'll probably purchase the LN tool anyway.
    My blog: http://www.sawmillcreek.org/blog.php?70802-Ben-Arnott

  13. #13
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    Totally unrelated, but I followed the link and stumbled upon the Lie-Nielson Auriou rasp video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwLA-...eature=related

    Start watching at about 3:00 and you'll see the guy punching the teeth by hand...it's hypnotic. There's some muscle memory right there. His hand and arm movement is like a typewriter resetting at it's margin. Awesome.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Arnott View Post
    Thanks for the link Roy. Your scratch stock looks very cool. Excellent alternative.
    Thanks, but it certainly isn't perfect. I've noticed that the clamping action of the fences doesn't quite hold the cutter tight enough and it will slide up under extended use. I think I need to add a set screw into it.

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