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Thread: Lathe reverse

  1. #1
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    Lathe reverse

    Can someone explain the whole reverse thing on a lathe? I mean, if you put the lathe in reverse, doesn't that screw the chuck? Or do you only put it in reverse when using a spur center or something...?
    I drink, therefore I am.

  2. #2
    Mike, I use reverse only for sanding, though I understand some folks use reverse to turn on the back side of the lathe. My Nova G3 chucks have a spindle screw to prevent backout of the chuck, but I never use it. But, then I don't power sand very much as I don't do heavy bowls. I wouldn't want to sand with much pressure without the screw in.

    With HF turning, I very rarely use a power sander.

  3. #3
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    Mike, like John, I only use reverse for sanding. The theory is that when sanding in one direction, the fibers will lay down but if you have reverse, the fibers will be cut off by the abrasive. Personally, I prefer to sand in reverse. Is it really necessary? No. You can get a very fine sanding job done with sanding the same direction you turned.

  4. #4
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    That's (sanding) the only intended purpose...and a big plus Some may argue this and that, but with the advent of a threaded chuck...sanding is it's best effort.
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears combat boots

  5. #5
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    Dec 2006
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    I sand the outside of a bowl in reverse at the top so that the dust is thrown away from me and into the dust collector and I sand the inside of the bowl in forward at the bottom of so that the dust is thrown away from me and into the dust collector.
    I have also found it useful to use reverse when hollowing a closed form. That way I can see what I am doing without having to lean over the lathe bed and look back at the front.

  6. #6
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    Feb 2003
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    Yorktown, VA
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    I haven't done it, but if I were to turn outboard on my Lathe (PM 4224) I would run in reverse so as to use my tools in the way I am used to using them when normally turning inboard, i.e. cutting on the left side of the piece as it turns counter clockwise. I'm very right handed, so if I tried to turn outboard with the lathe running clockwise, i'd have muscle memory issues and have trouble cutting.

  7. #7
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    Green Valley, Az.
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    Basicly, Turning with the lathe in reverse is dangerous and shouldn't be done. An airborne chuck along with a heavy blank can be lethal. However, sanding doesn't put much pressure on the wood so it can be considered safe. And it is effective.

    Some lathes, such as my Oneway have a groove cut in the spindle, and Oneway and others make their chucks with one or 2 grub screws to secure it safely to the spindle.

    I'm a lefty and do much of my turning on the outboard side of the lathe with the spindle turning in reverse. (actually it's turning in the same direction as it is when turning over the bed. The RH threads on the OB side effectively make it reverse turning)

    Wally

  8. #8
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    For some of you folks that may have a chuck that uses a bushing adapter like my Nova 2, it has a grub screw but it only tightens down on the adapter bushing. When I got my new Jet1642 and reversing capability which is absent on my midi, I was concerned about accidentally backing the chuck off in reverse. I removed the bushing from the chuck and drilled and taped a 1/4-28 screw hole in one of the adapters wrench flats and added a grub screw. Now it has a grub screw that interfaces with the 1642's spindle and the original. I definitely feel safer now when I am reverse sanding.
    ____________________________________________
    JD at J&J WoodSmithing
    Owingsville, Kentucky

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  9. sn2 and set screws

    Quote Originally Posted by James Combs View Post
    For some of you folks that may have a chuck that uses a bushing adapter like my Nova 2, it has a grub screw but it only tightens down on the adapter bushing.

    My SN2 has a set screw in the adapter to lock it on the spindle, and it has a set screw [grub?] also to lock the adapter on the chuck body, to keep everything intact for reversing the lathe.

    My Grizzly G0698 also included a faceplate with 2 screws to lock down the faceplate when reversing as well. It works really well.

    The main thing is that when you want to remove the chuck you must remember to unscrew the set screws or you can mess up the threads on the spindle. I took a dremel tool with a pointed grinding stone and made a little indention on the last thread so as to give the screw a place to set without any damage to the threads. Holds really well.
    Last edited by Roger Chandler; 11-17-2010 at 9:54 PM.
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  10. #10
    Mike, reverse is just one switch away-- why resist it?

  11. #11
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    My chucks all have grub screws. I do turn in reverse sometimes from the other side of the lathe. It can do wonders with tear out and I of course also use it for sanding. Makes a lot of difference in the finished product.
    Bernie

    Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.



  12. #12
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    So, what I'm getting is that most of you that do it, have some sort of set screw or grub that ensures (or at least reduces the risk) of the chuck unscrewing.

    I had no intention of using the reverse to turn, only to sand. With no set screws on my chucks, would it be advisable NOT to put a reverse switch in? As Steven stated, I can put one in for really cheap. So, money isn't the factor here.

    Now, unless I'm way off base here, since my outboard threads are reverse, I don't NEED a reverse to turn outboard, right? I just need to turn on the "other" side of the bowl than what I would otherwise be used to. And turning outboard with the lathe actually IN reverse means I would need a chuck that really tightened down...which I have a feeling isn't in my price range, so won't happen.
    I drink, therefore I am.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Lewiston, Idaho
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    Mike,

    I would put the reverse switch in.

    Even if you don't use it now, the capability would always be there. Then in the future if you are like me and forget how to install a reverse switch.....well you can see where this is going.
    Ken

  14. #14
    I use my reverse function with EVERY turning, during the sanding process. I wouldnt be without it. The set screw keeps the chuck attached. I found out the hard way why its important the install this part! That loud whirring sound was my chuck and bowl unscrewing of the lathe and getting prepared for the flight across the shop!

    I have turned in reverse, using a scraper to get underneath a bowl lip. Mainly because my lathe placement doesnt allow me to walk around to the back side for the correct angle and I dont want to lean across the ways. But I have only done this a few times.
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  15. #15
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    Mar 2009
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    Granite Falls, WA
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    Lead shot grub screw cushion

    I keep a small vial filled with #7 birdshot nearby. I put one pellet between the indent in the grub screw and the spindlle to prevent marring the spindle. I toss the flattened pellet when I take the chuck off the lathe. Use a new one each time.

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