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Thread: Dumb question: Where to oil my nail gun?

  1. #1

    Dumb question: Where to oil my nail gun?

    Hello,

    I know this is dumb, but I want to make sure that I do this right. I have two PC nail guns (brad and finish nailers), but they're both oil-less guns, so I've never had to oil a nail gun, but I just bought the PC PN100 pin nailer, and it requires oil. I know that I'm only supposed to put a couple of drops in it, but where do they go?

    Do they just go into the air connection inlet (where I attach the air hose)?

    Thanks,
    Louis

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Louis Brandt View Post
    Hello,



    Do they just go into the air connection inlet (where I attach the air hose)?
    Yep. Don't do it too frequently, though - the "one or two drops" is if you use it all day long.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    I bought a short "cheater hose" (about four feet or so long) and attached an inline oiler to the end of it. When I use a tool that needs oil, I attach the cheater hose to my air hose and the tool to the inline oiler. I detach the cheater hose when using something that doesn't require oil (like spray painting, sand blasting, etc.) The inline oiler supplies a small amount of oil as a mist when you're using the tool, and it prevents forgetting to oil the tool.

  4. #4
    Thanks to all. By the way, I just bought this PC pin nailer at Home Depot, while they had them at the reduced price of $69. I've had good success with my other two PC nailers, and I wanted a pin nailer, so I jumped on this one.

    Louis

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    For what it's worth, I don't use my nailers very often, so every time I break one out, I put a drop or two of oil in the air nipple then hook up the hose. So far I'm still using the oil that came with the kit, but it looks like a light weight machine oil. When it runs out, I'll probably use spout turbine oil (think that's the name, I use it on my Shopsmith).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome Hanby View Post
    For what it's worth, I don't use my nailers very often, so every time I break one out, I put a drop or two of oil in the air nipple then hook up the hose. So far I'm still using the oil that came with the kit, but it looks like a light weight machine oil. When it runs out, I'll probably use spout turbine oil (think that's the name, I use it on my Shopsmith).
    I don't know what spout turbine oil is, but you can find "air tool oil" at any of the box stores in the air tool section for a very nominal price that will last years if your usage is anything like mine.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy Brant View Post
    I don't know what spout turbine oil is, but you can find "air tool oil" at any of the box stores in the air tool section for a very nominal price that will last years if your usage is anything like mine.
    +1

    Though I hesitate to say it ... I picked up mine, at Harbor Freight

  8. #8

    where to oil my nail gun?

    A couple of drops of light oil in the air hose connection does the job. You can also use 3 n 1 oil or sewing machine oil, all the same thing and all works equally well. I use those or Marvel Mystery oil, WD-40, or air tool oil all those work too! The main thing is lubrication ( light weight type) is more important than brand. I have been using these in my air tools for years and never a failure from lack of lubrication.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Lewiston, Idaho
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    26,480
    My local Ace Hardware has A/C oil and pneumatic tool oil also. It's neither expensive nor hard to find.
    Ken

  10. #10
    How about a dummer question??
    No chance of any oil getting sprayed onto the work?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
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    Do they just go into the air connection inlet (where I attach the air hose)?
    Read pages 6, 7 and 8 of the manual.
    Under "Power Sources" on page 6, it's kind of hidden but they do say to put a couple drops of oil into the air inlet.
    They repeat it on page 8 under troubleshooting.

    Although you didn't ask,,,,pay particular attention to page 7 w/regards to how to orient the pins.

    If you get the arrows on the pins facing the wrong direction, the gun will jam.
    I suggest picking up a Sharpie and marking more arrows on the pins.
    I tossed quite a few pins due to the fact that PC is real stingey about how many arrows they put on them before I wised up and started marking them myself...

    No chance of any oil getting sprayed onto the work?
    Not so dumb a question as you might think.

    Yes - there is a risk of blowing oil onto places you won't want it.

    Excess oil will blow out the exhaust port, so, be aware of where it's directed before you start.
    The PC pin nailer exhausts right above the air inlet, so, excess oil can and will cover your hand.
    My 18 and 16 and 15 ga guns all have directional exhausts on top of the mailer that can rotate to direct the air/oil away from things.

    If you're a basic idiot like me, you find out the hard way as you look down the wall and see shiney spots every 16 inches...that you should have paid attention to where the exhaust is pointed

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Brooks View Post
    +1

    Though I hesitate to say it ... I picked up mine, at Harbor Freight
    Doesn't matter where you get it. Just as long as you use it.
    Never, under any circumstances, combine a laxative and sleeping pill, on the same night

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Felton, CA
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    105
    Quote Originally Posted by Lex Boegen View Post
    I bought a short "cheater hose" (about four feet or so long) and attached an inline oiler to the end of it. When I use a tool that needs oil, I attach the cheater hose to my air hose and the tool to the inline oiler. I detach the cheater hose when using something that doesn't require oil (like spray painting, sand blasting, etc.) The inline oiler supplies a small amount of oil as a mist when you're using the tool, and it prevents forgetting to oil the tool.
    I did the same thing. This short hose has served me well for many years. I got the inline oiler at Home Depot.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Doylestown, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    Although you didn't ask,,,,pay particular attention to page 7 w/regards to how to orient the pins.
    ..............
    If you get the arrows on the pins facing the wrong direction, the gun will jam.
    I suggest picking up a Sharpie and marking more arrows on the pins.
    I tossed quite a few pins due to the fact that PC is real stingey about how many arrows they put on them before I wised up and started marking them myself...
    .............
    True about orientation. I got some colored markers and color the top of the pins dark brown or black. 23 ga. pins are pretty inconspicuous to start with, if the heads are the same color as the wood they're even less conspicuous. Of course there's always filling but it may not be necessary unless they're front & center.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    I like that!
    Color the tops!
    So simple it should have been evident.

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