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Thread: Question about 23 gauge pin nailers

  1. #1

    Question about 23 gauge pin nailers

    Hello,

    I've never used a pin nailer, but I do have an 18 gauge brad nailer and a 16 gauge finish nailer. Home Depot is selling the Porter-Cable PN100 23 gauge pin nailer for $69, and I'm interested in it, but I know that it will only shoot a pin up to 1 inch long.

    A few pin nailers (Hitachi for examle) will shoot longer pins, so my question is, have any of you found that there are instances where you need a pin nail (not a brad) longer than 1 inch, and if so, what did you need it for?

    Thanks,
    Louis

  2. #2
    I don't usually use material that is less than 3/4" thick and don't feel that 1/4" of nail is enough holding power in most instances. So, I stock up to 1 3/4inch pins and use them all regularly.

    I find that I like to use pins to hold things together while I get my clamps in place. Meaning that often I'm pinning larger structural components and not just the small molding and trim pieces you might expect.

    I have an employee who bought a gun that only shoots 1" pins and he considers it next to useless.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    I have an employee who bought a gun that only shoots 1" pins and he considers it next to useless.
    When I finally realized that my Craftsman 18ga nailer only took up to 1-1/4", I ordered a second one, from Harbor Freight, that shoots up to 2".

    Agreed: I work with a fair bit of 3/4" stock, and -- like you -- want a bigger bite, to secure the pieces.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    I don't usually use material that is less than 3/4" thick and don't feel that 1/4" of nail is enough holding power in most instances. So, I stock up to 1 3/4inch pins and use them all regularly.
    If you don't mind my asking, what brand pin nailer do you have? I didn't know that any pin nailer shot pins up to 1 3/4 inch. I'm talking about 23 gauge pins, not 18 gauge brads.

    Louis

  5. #5
    i have a cadex 23 guage pin nailer that will take up to two inch pins.

    michael

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Port Orchard WA
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    432
    My Grex P650 will sink 2" pins into oak with no difficulties. With long pins you should remain aware that they can sometimes get deflected out the side, so keep the fingers clear! This is why 23g pins are better than 18g brads. You don't get as much blood on the project.

  7. #7
    Never had a need for a pin longer than 1" with my PC pin nailer.


    I go with 18ga if I need something longer


  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Clardy View Post
    Never had a need for a pin longer than 1" with my PC pin nailer.


    I go with 18ga if I need something longer
    Ditto.

    Why would I want to/need to fire a 23g 2" pin? I'm not arguing, its a legitimate inquiry.

    I use it for A+C 1/4" x 1/4" glazing strips - "delicate" stuff like that - and its tough enough with 5/8" pins to keep them from running wild in QSWO.

  9. #9
    I have a GREX, available at Woodcraft.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Victor, Idaho
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    My Max shoots 1 3/8" pins, and that is just enough for 3/4" thick trim. Anytime you are nailing 3/4" thick stock, you are most certainly using glue, so the pin only needs to keep the piece from falling on the floor while the glue drys.

    If not using glue, 18Gauge is the absolute smallest nailer I ever use, and that is only if the piece will not be under any stress.

    -Steve

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Kent A Bathurst View Post
    Ditto.

    Why would I want to/need to fire a 23g 2" pin? I'm not arguing, its a legitimate inquiry.
    Example: Gluing a 1.5" edge onto a table top. I really just want to glue and clamp it, but I can't hold the 10' board(conference table) up while I get clamps in place. A couple of pins will hold it in place while I get it all clamped up and not leave holes that need filling.

  12. #12
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Example: Gluing a 1.5" edge onto a table top. I really just want to glue and clamp it, but I can't hold the 10' board(conference table) up while I get clamps in place. A couple of pins will hold it in place while I get it all clamped up and not leave holes that need filling.
    Why not use a bisciut joiner? Leaves no nail marks and adds significant strength. Just curious. I personally cannot see a need for a 2" pin either. I can see a need for no nail holes. I was just at HD and was thinking about picking up the PC.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    It seems to me that some in this thread are confusing pin gun with a nail gun. If you already have two nail/brad guns then a small pin gun would be great. If you watch Norm Abrams he uses a small pin gun all the time and a 1" pin or smaller is about right.
    Best Regards,

    Gordon

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    The one operation that I do use longer 23 gage pins for is for "field installation" of face frames on cabinets after the carcasses have been placed, either on the wall or on the deck. The pins serve for what clamps would do in the shop...I shoot them in at a slight angle and vary the direction for each. That said, the majority of pins I shoot are 1/2" in length and that's for holding 1/4" trim material to the custom tack trunks I build, again while depending on glue for actual holding power. I also use pins quite a bit for temporary jigs.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    Normally you will be using a 23 ga to attach moldings. And usually 1" is enough. I really would rather have one that would shoot 1 3/4" pins. Mostly for shooting moldings into drywall. you need an extra 1/2" for the sheetrock. You still need to use some sort of adhesive if you are using pins. I find my senco 1" (max) invaluable in my shop. I wish it shot longer though.

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