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Thread: Cabinet sliding doors

  1. #1

    Cabinet sliding doors

    Have a buffet with 3 sliding doors to make and there seems to be 2 schools of thought regarding the bottom door tracks.
    1. Attach the track as a separate piece to the case bottom. This would obviously make the track higher than the case bottom but would be covered in the front by the face frame.
    2. The slots are cut right into the case bottom.

    Not sure which way to go on this.....advice?
    TIA

  2. #2
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    Attached track is easier, replaceable BUT, in the way when sliding things out of the storage area. Slots routed directly in solve the proud lip problem providing a smooth take-off and landing area. The alternative I prefer and that you did not mention is to dado the bottom and insert commercial track so that it is flush with the (top of the) bottom surface.

    Some commercial product (track and rollers or slides) provide longer life and smoother motion. The need for synthetics for your friction points will depend on use. If the doors are opened and closed several times a day the wear is significant. If they are opened and closed several times a year (like around the holidays) then wood runners are a bit more classic. JMHO.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 10-24-2010 at 9:30 AM.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  3. #3
    Not to hijack, just a question for Glenn.

    I looked up this track and roller hardware, and am interested to know if you think this hardware is fitting for fine furniture? (I am not a purist, for example I used undermount self-closing slides for the file drawers in my walnut secretary, because I thought they were rugged and functional.)

    I think this hardware would be very nice on furniture, but hate to build in hardware that doesn't hold up over the long haul.

    Here is a link for anyone else interested:
    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...oor%20hardware

    Thanks for any feedback!

  4. #4
    I saw that hardware too. One reviewer mentioned he used the rollers but not the track part, so I'm thinking of that idea. It's sort of a combination of classic looking(no track) with hidden modernization.
    I might let the client decide.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Murphy View Post
    Not to hijack, just a question for Glenn.

    I looked up this track and roller hardware, and am interested to know if you think this hardware is fitting for fine furniture?
    Hmmmm, I don't know that I am qualified to say whether something is fitting or not. As in your case of using the undermounts, we all have to make that decision for ourselves based on the purpose of the piece. Sometimes solid mefchanical hardware is the best choice. As to fitting . . . . I don't know ;-)

    I made some nightstands and used maple side runners. These are small drawers and are used seldom. I am waffling on a G&G style dresser I have planned as to whether to go with some practical full extension slides (blasphemy), classic wooden side runners (correct for the period) or a modified N-K (Nordiska Kompaniet) type of a deal.

    I must admit that the only pieces I have used mechanical slides on are shop cabinets but, that is not because I am a purist; I was just trying to learn the techniques. My link to the commercial sliding door hardware was just an attempt to help if the doors would see a lot of use like every day access. If they are more for seasonal convenience I would be tempted to go sans-mechanical. By targeting the "rollers" which don't really show and skipping the track I think Brian may have hit on the perfect balance.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 10-24-2010 at 10:42 PM.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  6. #6
    Brian and Glenn, here is where I found the rollers used on a furniture project. I think it came out well, and I tend to agree with you both on omitting the track, or at least fully recessing it to be flush. There is also the option of recessing brass channel instead of plastic track, but for me brass might call too much attention to the track.
    http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/projects/archive/2009/08/06/sliding-door-bookcase.aspx?T=Furniture&id=v0_0

    For Glenn, I first saw the undermount drawer slides in FWW #139 where Peter Turner built a very elegant entertainment center for his own home. It looked great, and was very functional. I was convinced, and am happy with my choice. I love the look of French slides, or a modified NK runner on a classic dovetailed drawer, but for a heavy file drawer you approach the limits of usability (practical limit of extension).
    Iíll try to post a picture for you Glenn.
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