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Thread: ready for "final" layout advice

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
    Posts
    695
    ok, a lot has happened since just a few weeks ago.

    I finally came to terms with the fact that my "under the stairs" lumber storage is a crazy waste of space. Plus, to stud and insulate the walls back there with the lumber storage in the way was going to be a pita.

    SO... Lumber storage under stairs is GONE.

    Simultaneously, I decided that an 8 foot long homeowner-style workbench is not needed in a woodworking shop.

    SO... My 8 footer is GONE too.

    NOW... Under the stairs, there will be a 6 foot homeowner-style workbench. Fasteners, battery charging, general tool boxes etc. This will be my "figure stuff out" type of area.

    Anyways, that frees up a lot of space.

    ----
    ALSO... I decided that with all my recent hard work insulating the entire shop, that a door between the spaces is just in the way.

    SO, the door is gone.

    AND, the other 4 foot opening between the sides of the shop.. that was previosly enclosed with a wall... GONE.

    SO... I now have an 8 foot opening between the two sides of the shop, with just a 4 inch post in the middle. Much more open.

    ---
    All these changes allowed me to skip the planer-on-mobile-cart-in-a-mini-garage idea, and give the planer its own dedicated home. The outfeed of the planer will lead to the table saw outfeed so I'll have a nice place to stack pieces as I go.

    ---
    I also now have several options for the band saw, let me know what you would try first.

    - In the corner, at an angle as shown in the attached layout. Since it's on wheels, I can pull it out a little bit if cutting something very long.

    - Anywhere else you think would be a good spot.

    -------

    Any other suggestions or comments?

    THANKS!!!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    South Orange, NJ
    Posts
    305
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Riefer View Post
    Ok, you've won me over :-) I'll build a mobile base (I found an old post by Glenn where he added weight to the base to reduce tippy-ness of the DP) ...
    I started with a HF furniture dolly, filled the open space with 3/4 plywood and bolted down the DP. When and if I need to move it, I just make sure that I hold on to the DP from the top and table to prevent and tipoff mishap. Don't know how heavy your DP is but the in my case it worked out the cheapest and functional way.

    Thanks for sharing your layout sketch. It made me to re-evaluate what I was planning to do. I currently have a 14x17' room in the basement as my temporary shop. I have another part of the open basement with large picture window with an adjacent enclosed room. I was planning to remove the partitioning wall to obtain a 17x36' shop but now I am thinking to leave it as to have a "clean" room. My question is how easy/difficult would it be to move assembled pieces in/out from that door way? A double french door would be better?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Riefer View Post
    Hey Jerome,
    I have the same concern about any bottle jack type of mechanism - when I was lifting the barn up, I used hyrdraulic to lift, and then braces to maintain.
    Good thing, you were not using HF bottle jacks to lift the barn. I wonder if they would tell you to take the barn down and bring the jack in if it would stuck in up position like it did happen to me on my motorcycle lift (I've posted a short story elsewhere recently)

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,740
    Only comment is to adjust your TS and outfeed table so you can rip 8ft and not have to open the door.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
    Posts
    695
    Thanks Don! You're totally right. My pic is slightly out of scale, but I can **just** get 8 foot in and 8 foot out as measured to the blade itself (as opposed to the edge of the table). Just a few inches to spare on a rip cut of that length (and can always open the garage door in a pinch).

    The layout gives me 8 in and 8 out for TS, jointer, planer.

    8 foot in (left), 6 foot out (right) for miter saw

    about 5 foot in (left), and 8 foot out (right) for drill press. But it is on wheels so I can move as needed.

    about 5 foot in and out for the band saw, but it is also on wheels.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado (Saddle Rock)
    Posts
    514
    The only thing I can say is think about your milling operation. I have my TS, jointer, and planer pretty close. This cuts down on the walking and it allows me to use my 4x6 TS outfeed as a shared work surface. This would also cut down on your DC runs. I'm not sure the 2 HP HF model will get the job done. Your size puts you in the area of a cyclone.

    As for the lift tables, I have one like it (red). I am always amazed by all of the uses they have. Mine has a 600 lb capacity.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
    Posts
    695
    Thanks for commenting Philip! I have about two steps to the jointer and plan to use the TS side table as my work surface/staging area. The planer is about 4 steps, but the outfeed is lined up with the TS outfeed.. So, as I walk pieces through, I have a nice place to stack and stage them too.

    Also, last night while sitting and staring at the space-in-transformation, I realized how to solve the band saw and drill press issues that were bothering me (namely that I'd have to roll them away from the wall just about every time I use them.

    New layout attached. Band saw now has 8 foot left, 8 foot right of the blade, and drill press has 8 foot left, 6 foot right (being right handed, having the room to the left is more important to me than previous setup).

    ----
    Regarding your dust collection comment... I guess I finally need to break down and do those big calculations. Damn. I was sort of hoping (although I'm embarassed to admit it now) that I could just be "that guy" that hooks up a 2hp HF unit with a bunch of 4 inch PVC and have a good enough setup.

    Edit: Ok, I found some charts and followed through the math. Here's what I have (I think):
    My "worst" tools need about 400 CFM
    My longest run (which happens to be a 400 CFM tool) including accounting for bends and flex is 50 feet
    If you multiply 50 feet by .055 (which is the number I found for 4" ducting) you get 2.75 static pressure loss.
    Since I'm venting the fines outside, nothing to add for filter.
    I'm thinking that the thien baffle I plan to use will add to that 2.75 static pressure loss.

    But, what does that all mean at the end of the day?

    ugh... confused now, I'll start another thread to get help with the math
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Bob Riefer; 10-28-2010 at 10:53 AM.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado (Saddle Rock)
    Posts
    514
    50 feet of duct = 3 HP Cyclone

    Sorry, but they are really that much better.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
    Posts
    695
    Wow, I fell down a rabbit hole today when I accidentally found a bunch of my old posts and couldn't help but laughing at myself. How you guys have put up with nearly exactly 10 years of my idiotic questions I'll never know (but will forever appreciate).

    In any case, I thought it was interesting to see how the "final layout" stood the test of time to current day... not bad actually.

    Here we are today:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

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