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Thread: Post Your Home Made Mobile Bases

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Gregoire View Post
    jim, i got the grizzly G0555

    paul, i had seen your wood type you made before with the lever arm. why did it fail?
    it failed mainly because i'm remodeling my shop and needed to throw something together in a hurry to keep moving the BS out of my way. It was too wobbly and the back wheels were metal and a bit too small. Also it needed two wheels on the lever arm.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado
    Posts
    230
    Here's one I made for my table saw. I added in a nut and some threaded rod in case I ever have to lift it off the casters. So far I have not needed to do that.



    And the jointer. Sorry my photos are not that great.


  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Western Maryland
    Posts
    5,548
    Quite honestly, I have made a few, but have come to the conclusion that I can buy them for cheaper or the same price than what I can make a good one for. When you figure in quality casters, hardward, and whatever material you make the rest of the base from, it is hard (for me at least) to make one for under $50. The Delta ones are usually $70-$100.

    So, unless you want to make a mobile base because you can't find just what you need, want to make something out of pride, or just plain want the challenge and enjoy the process, I find it cost or time effective to make one.

    That said, all three of the above reasons are darn good ones for making your own mobile base, and I don't pooh-pooh on anyone's desire to make one. Heck, some of the ones I've seen here on the Creek are practically furniture grade/quality! And while I have plenty of other things to spend my time on, my hat is off to and my respect goes out to everyone who builds one of these beautiful pieces.
    I drink, therefore I am.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Mid Missouri (Brazito/Henley)
    Posts
    2,767
    Over the years I scrounged up a few mobile bases from scrap iron acquired at the friendly local neighborhood junkyard. I have a little Sears 4x6 metal-cutting bandsaw that comes in handier than a zipper on a banana! My stick-welding is only passable, but enough for applications like these:

    Grizzly drum sander stand made from 3" stamped channel, 4" channel for the stationary wheel brackets, and a thick piece of 6x6 angle for the tricycle wheel bracket.




    Back in the day, those HTC tricycle stands were IT! I made my own for a Delta 14" BS from some 1-1/2"x5/8" channel, the 4"x2" channel for wheel brackets, and flat sheet for the gussets and bridge over the tricycle wheel. I made several of these for various machines.





    Just a month ago I scrounged up some heavy 3" channel, 1-1/2" sq. channel, and 4x2" channel for wheel brackets to make a base for Delta RC33 planer. The locking swivel wheel is from Rockler.


    My ShopFox 20" Planer needed a mobile base. The same 1-1/2" sq. channel was used to make a base which just fits the footprint of the big planer. Looks almost store-bought! Another Rockler locking swivel caster.



    As we speak, I am lowering my PM66 onto it's very own heavy-duty mobile stand of 3" channel and 3" angle. This one won't SAG even with a bank of heavily-loaded drawers under the extension table! Will add pix tomorrow when I can wheel it out into the open!
    ~chip~
    Last edited by Chip Lindley; 08-10-2010 at 10:41 PM.
    [/SIGPIC]Necessisity is the Mother of Invention, But If it Ain't Broke don't Fix It !!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Dakota
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    690
    Blog Entries
    2
    everyone is so creative but i would like to see some more made of wood.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Camas, Wa
    Posts
    3,638
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cruz View Post
    Quite honestly, I have made a few, but have come to the conclusion that I can buy them for cheaper or the same price than what I can make a good one for. When you figure in quality casters, hardward, and whatever material you make the rest of the base from, it is hard (for me at least) to make one for under $50. The Delta ones are usually $70-$100.

    So, unless you want to make a mobile base because you can't find just what you need, want to make something out of pride, or just plain want the challenge and enjoy the process, I find it cost or time effective to make one.

    That said, all three of the above reasons are darn good ones for making your own mobile base, and I don't pooh-pooh on anyone's desire to make one. Heck, some of the ones I've seen here on the Creek are practically furniture grade/quality! And while I have plenty of other things to spend my time on, my hat is off to and my respect goes out to everyone who builds one of these beautiful pieces.
    I have to move all of my tools to 1/3 of my 3 car garage every night. I need bases that can turn on a dime and fit into tight places. To accomplish that I need all 4 wheels to swivel. I have not see any company making something like that. I can make mine for about what you can buy a welded non-universal base. They work so much better.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Western Maryland
    Posts
    5,548
    Ok, so you are making yours out of necessity, not for "creativeness"...gotcha. Seems reasonable to me!

    One of the reasons I moved to bought bases was that I tried the "making my own" thing and wasn't really satisfied. Chip's ,BTW, look awewome...they make me wish I had a welder, but that would open a whole new can of worms.

    The reason I wasn't happy with home made was two fold. First of all, even when I bought what I thought were very good casters (and cosequently paid pretty well for them, too) I found that they had enough "slop" in the swivel casters to allow the machine to move enough to wobble...not nearly enough to make it unstable, but enough that I could rock it around. Upon analysis, it was the casters, not the base. Also, when you have 4 swivel casters, you get sort of a dead zone in the movement. For example, when you move the equipment up to a wall, to move it back out, the wheels need/want to swivel/spin back around. This can make initial movement difficult, with a slight side motion to boot.

    I have found simple fixed mobile bases much more steady than ones with 4 swivel casters. That is why I use them. I'm not a real fan of universal ones...

    I don't see a reason why the bought ones won't work for you. The only challenge is that the foot pedal would stick out...but they flip up, so it really shouldn't be that much of an issue. I mean, hey, you are already inconvenienced by having to move your machines out of the way each time you use them. Believe me, you are doing your part by lugging these things back and forth. I am lucky that I don't have to do that, but if I did, I would seriously have to consider whether to continue this thing I love so much. My hat is off to you and anyone else that goes through those motions!

    Here is a link to where I have gotten mine. Good service, and million to choose from. They even have more if you call with a size not shown...maybe some for/from other manufacturers.

    http://www.deltaportercable.com/Prod...4377.4386.3892
    Last edited by Mike Cruz; 08-11-2010 at 6:52 AM.
    I drink, therefore I am.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Camas, Wa
    Posts
    3,638
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cruz View Post
    I don't see a reason why the bought ones won't work for you.
    Using a mobile base with 2 fixed wheels is like trying to parallel park a car. It's a total PITA. You do this zig zag dance just to get it close. I have an 8" jointer with a built in moblie base and 78" tables. To park that flat against the wall I have to make a big arc. I don't always have a path clear to make said arc. I also don't have to remove everything to get to that one machine in the back. I go to the row I need and remove the one or two tools in front of it and I am ready. They can be stacked in any orentation and removed the same way. I find the Woodcraft wheels lock down solid and the big wheels make them roll easier.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,044
    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...31+mobile+base

    I made a similar base for my 17" band saw, however I don't have any photographs........Rod.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,173

    Mine is not a thing of beauty.

    Quick 'n' dirty was the order of the day but it works well. I found the Rikon 10-325 table too high for my tastes and the saw had to be mobile. I built a 2X4 and plywood box to lower the saw and screwed the box to an unused Delta mobile base. If I didn't have the unused mobile base, I'd have attached wheels or casters directly to the plywood base. I reworked the lifting mechanism on the mobile base to use 2 smaller casters rather than the 1. To lift the saw I step on the T hinge, the casters rotate and the "tongue" locks under the ledge. To lower the saw step on the hinge, lift up on the rope and the saw lowers and rests level on 2 blocks fastened to the front corners of the mobile base.

    Mike has a point about fixed wheels. You'd need to do "5 point turns" to move sideways. Mine is pretty much straight out and straight back so fixed wheels are not an issue for me. An advantage of fixed wheels is when most of the pushing force is perpendicular to the wheels, they don't move at all. I don't have to bend over to lock or unlock brakes which is nice.

    base1.JPG

    base2.JPG

    base3.JPG

  11. #26
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Prairieville, Louisiana
    Posts
    578

    Smile This one . .

    This one has "zero" non-swivel casters . . .

    Steve
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Support the "CREEK" . . .

  12. #27
    I made this 10 days ago. My Ferm contractor's saw needs to be moved around continuously to allow me access to various parts of my tiny workshop.

    The design parameters were that the saw could be moved in any direction and the mechanism would be foot operated. The base is attached directly to the legs of the saw but the mechanism (inspired by others I have seen) could be adapted to fit a separate base.

    Photos 1 and 3 show the front and back. The weight of the saw pushes the legs down. The lever is up. When the lever is pushed down the hinged wooden bar locks it down (photo 4). Photo 2 shows the back with the legs lifted about 1cm of the floor.

    The frame is made out of 60 x 20mm aluminium box section. The wooden bar is "hinged" with duct tape.

    To Do: Replace the wooden bar with a properly hinged aluminium one and cap the ugly open ends.

    It works.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    • File Type: jpg 1.jpg (58.0 KB, 179 views)
    • File Type: jpg 2.jpg (64.7 KB, 167 views)
    • File Type: jpg 3.jpg (94.2 KB, 160 views)
    • File Type: jpg 4.jpg (63.2 KB, 155 views)

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Randolph County (Asheboro, NC)
    Posts
    69

    Band Saw Base

    Greetings from NC!
    I have attached pictures of a bandsaw base constructed from birch plywood and the mobile base from ash. The band saw is a 1946 model Delta purchased at auction back in the late 90's. The bandsaw and base have served me well.







    Respectfully,
    Tom Wassack
    Asheboro, NC
    Last edited by Tom Wassack; 08-11-2010 at 6:23 PM.

  14. #29
    Just one corner.
    250 pound casters.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    690
    Blog Entries
    2
    Pat,
    where did you get these casters? i really like them and especially because the lever
    is made of metal, so many are plastic these days.
    did you make the aluminum mount?


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