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Thread: New Build - Double Cutaway Prototype

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Wixom, MI
    Posts
    1,161
    WOW.....that is going to be SO beautiful!!! Can't wait to see more...
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Starosta View Post
    WOW.....that is going to be SO beautiful!!! Can't wait to see more...

    Thanks Keith. If we ever get a break from the heat, I'll be able to get back on the build. I'm on hold until then.

    Peace,
    Mark
    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

  3. #33
    Nicely done.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Wixom, MI
    Posts
    1,161
    Hey Mark! Any progress on this piece? I'd LOVE to see an update...

    Hope all is well!!

    - Keith
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Starosta View Post
    Hey Mark! Any progress on this piece? I'd LOVE to see an update...

    Hope all is well!!

    - Keith
    Hi Keith.

    I have done a bit of work on it. I have all the neck blanks cleaned up, truss rod channels routed and ready for the ears and heels to be glued up. I just haven't had the time or energy to do much else. It's cooling down this time of year and I have next week with the house to myself...should be a productive one.

    Peace,
    Mark
    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

  6. #36
    Looking great Mark. I'm thinking of doing a gibby style headstock for my next build, though to keep it simple I might go with a Fender bolt-on.

    How did you get your SS bandsaw to cut straight? Mine has a serious drift to it (and w/o that custom table, very little resaw ability), probably close to 15 deg. I compensate pretty easily since I found the drift angle and marked it on some mdf for aligning cuts.
    joecrafted

  7. #37
    Looks great.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Cunningham View Post
    Looking great Mark. I'm thinking of doing a gibby style headstock for my next build, though to keep it simple I might go with a Fender bolt-on.

    How did you get your SS bandsaw to cut straight? Mine has a serious drift to it (and w/o that custom table, very little resaw ability), probably close to 15 deg. I compensate pretty easily since I found the drift angle and marked it on some mdf for aligning cuts.
    Hi Joe. Thanks. Sorry for the late respose. I've been away from the forum for a month or so.

    My SS band saw has never had an issue with drift. I have read that the tracking of the wheels has a lot to do with it...even heard of guys tugging on them to align them better. Might check out the SS forum on their site...lots of guys there with alot more experience that me.

    Peace,
    Mark
    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Neighbarger View Post
    Looks great.
    Thanks Rich.
    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

  10. #40

    Back in the Saddle Again!

    Well, after months of hot weather, crushing schedule at work and a general lack of ambition in the midst of it all, I'm finally getting back to this build. In the time off I've had lots of time to think about the next steps and a few jigs to help with future builds.

    One of my setups that has long needed a revamp is how I cut my truss rod channels. I used to just clamp off a straight edge to the bench, measure out and screw the blank to to bench top and set stops at either end to control the router. It worked okay but I wanted a jig that would give me quick, repeatable results. What I came up with is not too far from where I started but it is much faster and more accurate. And it allows me to route a channel in a blank with an angled headstock while fully supporting the length of the blank to avoid flexing during routing. It can be setup on any surface as long as the end can hang out over the edge.



    Back when I bought my chop saw, it came with a package of hold-downs for keeping stock in place on the saw. I never saw any need for them but I tossed them into a drawer for use at a future date. Today was that day.
    After measuring everything out, I installed countersunk T-nuts on the underside in several positions. The hold-down threads thru the top and into the T-nut. The heel end of the blank is secured here. The headstock sticks thru an opening on the other end and is held in place with a clamp.
    The blank is laid in on a centerline and the router runs along the fence.

    The router uses an aluminum plate that I made for it on my first build. I didn't incorporate any stops because the bit just doesn't go anywhere without firm pressure so the chances of going too far are minimal as long as stop and start points are clearly marked. I routed 6 channels in about 30 mins.





    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

  11. #41
    This build is going to have a bound fretboard so I wanted to have a jig for tapering the fretboard blank. This allows me to size for the binding before attaching the fretboard to the blank. It eliminates the need for routing after the fretboard is attached.

    Without building another jig all together, I was able to flip my truss rod jig and use the fence to ride along the side of the band saw table. It was 3/4" wider than I needed so this allowed me to make a pass with the saw running and trim it to a perfect width.

    I installed T-nuts on the top side...countersunk so they don't interfer with travel...and when flipped over, I can clamp the fretboard blank into place with hold-downs. It's very similar to a taper jig for a table saw except it rides the edge instead of a miter slot. Even if the jig were to back away from the table during cutting, worst case, I make another pass...it can't get too close to the blade to gouge the fretbord or jig.



    The marked tape lines are set to the edge of the jig and then it just takes a pass thru the saw and done. Turn the blank around and repeat.



    Here's my test on a maple blank. I cut it just a touch wide to allow for shaping and final sanding.



    More very soon.

    Peace,
    Mark
    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

  12. #42
    Moving on with the neck build I wanted to have a sure-fire way of cutting the access for TR adjustment. I've tried using a long bit on my ShopSmith in the horizontal boring position but it keeps flexing up away from the headstock. And Forstner bits are too short for the most part to get the throw I need.

    I started thinking about pocket screw jigs and how they support the bit as it's guided in at an angle. I took a look at how Preeb and Scatter Lee did their jigs and sort of combined all of the above into something that would be one piece, attach easily, center itself and give consistant results.
    I did a bit of pre-viz in 3D just to see what I needed to do to make it happen. Here's the basic design.

    The top is a piece of 1" stock running end to end with a 14 degree wedge glued under it. There is a 1/4" spline attached to the underside that locks into the TR channel and centers the jig. A 5/8" bore is run straight thru at the proper height and a 1.25" hole is drilled on top as a window to monitor the depth of the drilling.











    Peace,
    Mark
    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

  13. #43
    The plan seems to have worked out well. I started by sizing the 2 pieces and gluing them up. I left 8" forward of the line where the wedge meets the top piece. Here they are in the clamps. I used the pipes of the clamps to brace additional 14 degree wedges in place to use for gluing cauls.



    When they came out of the clamps, I attached a 6" rosewood spline on the centerline. I left enough space at the end of the slpine so it didn't have to fit right up to the end of the TR channel. I just needed it to be inplace to center the jig.



    Here it is set into place...I still need to plane down the spline a bit to get the jig to sit flat on the neck.



    After thinning out the spline...it didn't need much. You can see I altered the original desing a bit by leaving a tongue on the back of the jig to give me another clamp point so the jig can't lift at the rear duing boring.



    Here it is with the tongue trimmed out and clamped in place on a mahogany blank.



    I eased the edges and cleaned it up a bit. I still need to do the bore...I'll save that for tomorrow.





    Peace,
    Mark
    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

  14. #44
    making a drilling jig like that is a great idea...I could see where that could have other applications too.

    Have you considered over boring and inserting a metal tube into the jig to keep it form wearing? Of course you'd have to find one with the right inside diameter. Might be easier said than done.

  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Houseal View Post
    making a drilling jig like that is a great idea...I could see where that could have other applications too.

    Have you considered over boring and inserting a metal tube into the jig to keep it form wearing? Of course you'd have to find one with the right inside diameter. Might be easier said than done.
    Hi Dave. I have several pieces of tubing in my junk drawer but none of them have the correct ID. I did think about countersinking a 5/8" stop collar at the opening of the bore...not sure that would accomplish the same thing though.

    Peace,
    Mark
    "Thought that is no longer limited brings experience that is no longer limited" Marianne Williamson.

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