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Thread: Veneering compound curves

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    That wood on the back of a violin or viola or cello is solid wood - it is not veneered or bent.

    Mike
    Correct. The fronts and backs are literally carved to the contour while keeping precise thickness, some of which is done with cute little hand-planes with curved bottoms.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Correct. The fronts and backs are literally carved to the contour while keeping precise thickness, some of which is done with cute little hand-planes with curved bottoms.
    Or in my case with an ugly big Kutzall carver in an angle grinder. I'm too cheap to buy those planes...

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kananis View Post
    This is a good discussion regardless but the OP posted once on this site, 14 years ago.
    Thanks John, It is always good to be reminded to start at the beginning and look before you leap.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    My point exactly. I took this statement as he didn't trust solid wood.I am concerned with the longjevity of the flamed and quilted maple supplies as used in my industry.
    I thought he meant that is why he is looking at veneer. don't know of any contoured wooden instruments that use figured veneer. But I have no proof of that.
    The back of many cellos are figured maple, either a solid piece or two pieces resawn and then glued together. You'll see a vertical glue line. Many of those cellos were made in the 1700's and are still being played - with the same back.

    I suspect the same is true for violins and violas but I'm not as familiar with them as I am with a cello.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachary Hoyt View Post
    Or in my case with an ugly big Kutzall carver in an angle grinder. I'm too cheap to buy those planes...
    Keep your eye open for them "out there" used...or make some of your own. Pask Makes has done a few small planes like this on his channel on the 'Tube. He used metal, but you can do wood, too. I had one but sold it here in the classifieds last year 'cause it never got used. But it was cute!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachary Hoyt View Post
    Or in my case with an ugly big Kutzall carver in an angle grinder. I'm too cheap to buy those planes...
    The few guys I have met that make carved instruments also carve their own planes. Making a violin plane is on my ever growing to do list. I have one in mind to copy. It was made by R.L. Givens and hangs on a nail of honor at the mandolin factory. It looks a little like this one.
    Screen Shot 2024-06-11 at 11.30.49 AM.jpg
    snip from eBay
    more from the web including a plan
    https://finelystrung.com/2008/08/16/...making-planes/
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 06-11-2024 at 2:04 PM. Reason: link

  7. #22
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    Thanks for the link. Making finger planes looks like fun. I have gotten pretty used to the way I carve now, but it would be interesting to try another way. I've carved the plates for 34 fiddles, 7 archtop mandolins, 5 archtop guitars, a cello and a bass so far using abrasive carving, and it's fast but also loud and messy.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachary Hoyt View Post
    Thanks for the link. Making finger planes looks like fun. I have gotten pretty used to the way I carve now, but it would be interesting to try another way. I've carved the plates for 34 fiddles, 7 archtop mandolins, 5 archtop guitars, a cello and a bass so far using abrasive carving, and it's fast but also loud and messy.
    The Bass is looking excellent! What an undertaking! I continue to enjoy your blog.
    https://hoytbanjos.com/2024/06/12/a-...ass/#like-6401

    The Givens plane is more like this.
    Screen Shot 2024-06-13 at 8.04.58 AM.png

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