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Thread: Corel Draw question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    22

    Corel Draw question

    Referring to the attached photo, is it easily possible in Corel Draw to join type and a shape (top image) so as to laser cut both as one piece (bottom image)?
    Thanks in advance for any and all info.

    John H.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Sure. Convert the rectangle and text to curves. Then weld them all together. (You could select one piece and weld each part incrementally.) I'm sure there are other ways.

    EDIT: actually, if you haven't broken each letter apart, then it treats the text line as a single entity and it is very quick. Once you have your Shaping docker running, with WELD selected, click the rectangle, click WELD TO, then the text. But it will also allow you to weld more pieces like vector shapes etc. All the shapes should be outlined with no fill.
    Last edited by Richard Rumancik; 04-01-2010 at 10:59 PM. Reason: more info

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Kitchener, Canada
    Posts
    189
    Bill Jermyn
    Waterloo Engraving
    Kitchener, ON
    Epilog Legend 32EX 75 Watt, Corel X3, Photograv, Wacom Intuos 3 6X8 graphics tablet

  4. #4
    Actually it's not necessary to convert to curves as that is done automatically by the weld action.
    The arrow points to the weld tool which you can add to your toolbar.

    Select both items and weld as shown in 1. The result is shown in 2.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Mike Null; 04-02-2010 at 7:15 AM.
    Mike Null

    St. Louis Laser, Inc.

    Trotec Speedy 300, 80 watt
    Woodworking shop CLTT and Laser Sublimation
    Evolis Card Printer
    CorelDraw X5

  5. #5
    Mike is correct, you don't actually have to convert the text and rectangle to curves first - I did not know that. Bill's method in the video uses the contour operation on the text, which you may want to use if you need to "fatten" the letters up. But you can just use the standard character outline instead (with no fill) if the letters are already the weight you need.

    John - one point about your example - you do end up with some thin vertical lines which may be fragile. Depends on what this will be used for. But sometimes it is necessary to thicken or edit specific sections to make it "manufacturable" and/or look better.

    To do this, just take the welded shape, select it with the pick (arrow) tool. All the nodes will be shown as little rectangles. Then click the "shape tool" and drag/move any nodes to improve on the image as need be.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    22
    Thanks all for your help in this.

    John H.

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