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Thread: ROS vs. Belt Sander

  1. #1

    ROS vs. Belt Sander

    Does anyone out there have a comparison or opinion between a random orbit sander and a belt sander for end grain stock removal? I have a butcher block that needs flattening and I'd rather get an aggressive or dual action ROS than a belt sander, as I'd have more use for the ROS in the future. My thinking is that if I can get 70-80% of the performance of a belt sander out of an aggressive ROS, then that's the way for me to go.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I Think You're Right

    If you can only have one and don't need a belt sander for other tasks, I'd go ROS
    18th century nut --- Carl

  3. #3
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    ROS! You'd be surprised how much stock a more aggressive ROS, combined with some "assertive" sandpaper, can take off! Back off the paper grits and you have a pretty nice finish sander. Just MHO....
    Cheers,
    John K. Miliunas

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  4. #4
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    Mickey -

    Have you considered a cabinet scraper? Between sanders - it would be easier to get a flat surface witha belt sander. However, a ROS would get more overall use. Maybe ROS and scraper?

    Regards,
    Ted

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Shrader
    Mickey -

    Have you considered a cabinet scraper? Maybe ROS and scraper?

    Regards,
    Ted
    Yeah, but Ted...But, but, but....'ya can't plug the scraper in!
    Cheers,
    John K. Miliunas

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  6. #6
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    With those options the ROS has more control (IMHO) and doesn't "dive-in or catch an edge like a BS.

    Learning the Neander ways, for that task I'd lean toward a Scrub, jointer, jack and scraper.
    TJH
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  7. #7
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    How much material to you have to remove? A sixteenth or so would be as much as I'd do with a sander. For more than that, I'd do the bulk of the work with a router and a flattening jig.

  8. #8
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    You might also consider locating a drum sander if it's the top side your sanding, you would get a much truer sanding. For the, have you thought about a router bit and then final sanding with a ROS?
    Scott C. in KC
    Befco Designs

  9. #9
    I'm with Jamie, I vote for the flattening jig and a router. All you have to do is get two straight boards and mount them so they are in the same plane edgewise. Then construct a wide stiff router mounting plate that you can slide on the rails described above. Then mount a straight planer bit in your plunge router and creep up on it until you have achieved the flatness you desire. Little sanding and you're done.
    Last edited by Michael Stafford; 10-29-2004 at 2:06 PM. Reason: spelling correction
    Big Mike

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  10. #10
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    John -

    Sorry. I humbly apologize for potential mis-direction. Sort of like when I go to the toolbox and open the screwdriver drawer and get out a "cordless" screwdriver.

    Also write me up for not advocating acquisition of additional tools.

    Ted

  11. #11

    ROS vs. Belt Sander

    Normally, I'd take the Neander route, but this it a true butcher block I'm dealing with - it's all end-grain that needs flattening. I don't have a large, low-angle plane such as a Stanley 62; I do have a low-angle block plane (Stanley 65), but the prospect of using it to flatten a 18"x22" butcher block is unsavory at best. I'll probably use the straight-edge/router method, but would like to rationalyze the purchase of a new tool . Of course, maybe the new tool needs to be a Lee Valley Low-Angle Smoother.

    Thanks,

    Mickey

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