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Thread: Do I need belt sander?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    568

    Do I need belt sander?

    Local retailer has PC 352vs clearanced and I am contemplating the investment, I guess in an effort to justify the $ to LOML I wondered how much it will be used. My thoughts are for taking the dirt skin off or reclaimed lumber and also for sanding tops flush, etc...I already have an ROS and a pad sander and this seemed to be a good deal...any input?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,590
    I don't think I've used my belt sander in over 3 years. By the time I do the brand new belts I bought for it about 5 years ago will probably be bad.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  3. #3
    Seldom use mine anymore.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, Minnesota
    Posts
    2,095
    When you need a belt sander, nothing else will do.

    I tried taking some old paint and gunk off reclaimed pine boards yesterday using my Festool ROTEX and even it couldn't do as good a job as my old, junky Craftsman belt sander.

    There's simply no substitute.

    Jason


    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Yoder View Post
    Local retailer has PC 352vs clearanced and I am contemplating the investment, I guess in an effort to justify the $ to LOML I wondered how much it will be used. My thoughts are for taking the dirt skin off or reclaimed lumber and also for sanding tops flush, etc...I already have an ROS and a pad sander and this seemed to be a good deal...any input?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rockville, MD
    Posts
    1,217
    Rarely, but turned on its side, its a good, quick shovel and axe sharpener.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Porter,TX
    Posts
    1,170

    Belt Sander

    Belt sanders are speciality items,being sold for the sole purpose of removing wood fast.Like everythink else comes in a variety of sizes.Making butcher block tops?Pull out the beltsander,just glued up some panels and need to level them(if you don't have a drum sander)pull out the belt sander.Right now I'm making a cabinet and the faceframe needs to be flush with the inside panel,its off by a 1/32.If I had the small belt sander that PC makes I would be using it instead of the ORS.Get you one and when the need comes up you will have it.---Carroll

  7. #7

    Belt Sander

    I used one all the time before I purchased a 22-44" drum sander. Any boards I planed and/or glued up would end up getting touched with the belt sander to remove any snipe or chatter marks before using the random orbit sander. The biggest challenge I used to have, is that it can remove a lot of wood fast and usually when your not looking as close as you should be.

    I will still use it occasionally, but not nearly as much as I used to.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,336
    They're good for lapping the backs of old chisels and plan irons.
    Where did I put that tape measure...

  9. Do I need belt sander?

    I would say yes... As said before this is one of those tools that when you need it there is little to subsitute for it. And you can do a lot with them. ( just remember you have it) if you can get one at a good price I say buy one!! There is always room for another tool!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    568
    We shall see if they still have it tomorrow. Maybe the decision has already been made for me. You know how those clearance deals are...Here today, gone tonight...

  11. #11
    I wouldn't count on removing paint with a belt sander - the belts clog up very quickly.

    Incidentally, if you mount it on a little "belt sander table" it becomes an even more useful tool.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bangor, PA
    Posts
    1,852
    I wouldn't know how to flatten a wide panel or table top without a hand held belt sander. Though I own a 24" wide belt sander, I still need the hand held to flatten wide panels table tops and face frames wider than my wide belt can handle. I know Random Orbital sanders have a lot of capability but they don't replace a belt sander for me. My advice would be to own at a 3X21" belt sander with a bag.
    fmr

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    568
    I just checked in and they still have the PC for about $127 and also found out that they have the B&D Dragster model for about $45. I would like to buy the better tool, but was curious if the Dragster could do some of the same things. I realize that it is not as heavy duty as the PC and is not variable speed. Could a router speed control be used with it to make it quasi-variable speed. Maybe not a legitimate comparison, just thought I would throw it out there...I have never needed a belt sander before now, so I just thought why spend more than I have to. I need to "level" the edgebanding for some cabinet tops prior to putting the laminate on and I tought the belt sander would work.

  14. #14
    This is probably one of those cases where you should just buy a Harbor Freight model for $39.99 (add a 20% off coupon for more savings) or a $55 Skil. If you are not sure how much you are going to use it, do not invest alot into it. If it turns out that you do use it a lot, invest in a better one. I went through two of the $55 Skil models before I invested in a decent Porter Cable. I have no regrets. I do not use it all the time, but as posted here: There really is no substitute if you need it. If you know you NEED a tool, you will know what you NEED to spend.

  15. #15
    I get a lot of use out of a belt sander.
    My first belt sander was a Porter Cable unit that looked like a small locomotive. It was a great tool, but limited in use.
    I am now on my second Bosch belt sander.The nice things about the Bosch sander is the light weight, and the ability to lay it on its back. The cons are the light weight, and the lack of ability to clamp it when on its back. Bosch's way of promoting their carriage I suppose.

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