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Thread: Show us your Bench

  1. #286
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    1,233
    Hereís mine again. Nearly 10 years after it made its debut in post #8 of this thread. Sheís done well. A few blemishes from honest use and a nice patina. Since the first post Iíve added a bottom shelf and some hangers for planing stops and bench hooks.

    CCDE6A39-C8AB-4AE6-BD69-EF6AFF320511.jpg
    It's wood dust. Saw dust would suggest a problem.

  2. #287
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Here’s mine again. Nearly 10 years after it made its debut in post #8 of this thread. She’s done well. A few blemishes from honest use and a nice patina. Since the first post I’ve added a bottom shelf and some hangers for planing stops and bench hooks.

    CCDE6A39-C8AB-4AE6-BD69-EF6AFF320511.jpg
    Rob,

    In going through the entire thread there were a couple of interesting observations: First, there sure were a lot of "Roubo" benches being built or just completed and second, a lot of the folks from that time no long post. The good news is you and Jim K are still here.

    I'll add one of the first photos of my last bench build, a shop sized Moravian bench:

    benchFinishedD.jpg

    I'll add one more. This is the bench I was using and building back near the start of the thread. Things have gotten much simpler and I think a much more usable bench less driven by "must have" extras and more by what works and only what works.

    2bench 12-13.jpg

    ken
    Last edited by ken hatch; 06-01-2019 at 8:03 PM.

  3. #288
    I'll add one more photo, to kinda show the evolution of my work bench builds. As I've posted before with each new build the benches get simpler and easier to use. I started off building benches with every bell and whistle, with all the must have crap built in, most of which after working with it drove me barking mad. With each build stuff was removed until I've arrived at today's very simple Moravian bench.

    This bench, build with European Beach fits in between the first two benches and was the last French style bench I've built. I doubt I'll build another, there are better designs.

    workbenchFinal.jpg

    ken

  4. #289
    George Wilson made an interesting comment on this thread that stuck with me because I feel about the same. I can't remember the exact words but the jest of it was making furniture didn't excite him, making workbenches did. It brought me up short and has me thinking about what I want to do with my life when I grow up. The problem with making workbenches is they cost a few bucks to make, they take up a lot of room once made and you can't just pass 'em on the the kids and neighbors. The only way I could fit another bench in my shop is to kick an older bench out. Whatever, I think I'm going to make a new portable Moravian and then figure out what to do with it once it is finished.

    BTW, because this thread is a little long in tooth I may start a new one based on George Wilson's comment.

    ken

  5. #290
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    827
    Thatís a very solid bench David, Iím guessing it does not come apart for moving, hard to see if your dogs are round or oblong.
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  6. #291
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Vannucci View Post
    Here's mine. 4" split top, 88" long, 24" total width, 34" high (I'm 6'1").

    LV quick-release front vise with a ridiculously large chop. LN proper tail vise, which is just about my favorite thing, ever.

    I really wanted to build with hard maple, but I could only afford doug fir (2x12x16, ripped and chopped in half, to net four boards each). But when it came time to consider the vises, dog holes, etc, I couldn't stand working in softwood any longer. So, it's around 2/3 fir, 1/3 maple.

    Ignore the aborted surgery for a leg vise with scissor arrangement. Long story - I like this front vise better.

    The most memorable part of the build was right at the end, when I decided it would be much easier to install the front vise, if I (all by myself) were to flip the bench on it's top. The bench actually went over very gently. But when it came time to reverse the process... what the heck was I thinking? It may as well have been glued to the shop floor. I eventually did get it, with some sketchy blocks, and a nine-foot prybar. When it finally dropped onto it's feet, it was like a glacier calving into the sea. At least I was spared the embarrassment of having the mailman pull up with me trying to work on an upside down bench. I'm guessing total weight is in the 500-600 lb range (without the Moxon / joinery bench).

    Joe,

    Nice looking bench, it should serve you well.

    BTW, BTDT. Wresting French bench sized timber in a one man shop is always interesting. Good you didn't get hurt.

    ken

  7. #292
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    827
    Built mine based on memories of school benches when I was 14yrs old! Made a few changes such as making the tail vise twice as long, making it a proper height for my back (38”), deeper tool tray, some dogs at the back of the bench, a 2” ledge behind the bench front for clamping, groove in the lower 2/3 of the shoulder vise to slide in anti wracking spacers and main stretchers of ash in the middle of the legs where they should be!
    Top is non furniture grade black walnut, legs white oak, feet and tool well cherry. Posted the build here back in December under “Fretwell’s Long Tail Danish Workbench”.

    801EAC0B-BDC5-43B4-BBFD-FB71A8D47278.jpeg

    Despite being a sprightly 358lbs it does not move, not even vibrate when used. The dogs angle in 2 degrees and just hold the wood, it almost feels like cheating. The tail vise opens 13” which is in itself useful but also makes the bench over a foot longer. Have a dead man to build that hooks onto the front stretcher. My favourite feature is the height to save my back. The two inch clamping ledge behind the front is most useful. One bonus is it can be moved easily as it dismantles, top and bottom.
    Which I had built it sooner!
    Last edited by William Fretwell; 06-03-2019 at 1:25 PM.
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  8. My Bench

    Hi,

    I've never encountered this thread before and it's great to see all the beautiful benches that have been built. I was moved to add mine.

    It's definitely not beautiful. I built it a long time ago - around 1975 - so that I would have a decent bench to use at the various shops I worked in and around NYC. Some of those companies didn't mind if I brought my own bench in. Some did. Its funny. Benchmen in those shops often worked at the crappiest old benches you could imagine.

    It comes all apart so it can be moved - by one person if necessary. It was very hard to find plans for a proper bench at that time but I was lucky and found one in a British magazine, I think it was called Practical Woodwork or Popular Woodwork.

    It's hard maple. Over the years I added two other vises. One is a custom vise Jerry Fank made for me just after he started Jerry-Rig. I don't think he ever sold another of that design - it might be the only one. Recently I added an Emmert turtleback on the back.

    It's worked very well, so much so that I've never even considered making another. And now it's like an old friend. Wouldn't know what to do without it...

    20190605_174931.jpg


    20190605_175402.jpg

    20190606_020120.jpg

    20190606_020137.jpg

  9. #294
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Altman View Post
    Hi,

    I've never encountered this thread before and it's great to see all the beautiful benches that have been built. I was moved to add mine.

    It's definitely not beautiful. I built it a long time ago - around 1975 - so that I would have a decent bench to use at the various shops I worked in and around NYC. Some of those companies didn't mind if I brought my own bench in. Some did. Its funny. Benchmen in those shops often worked at the crappiest old benches you could imagine.

    It comes all apart so it can be moved - by one person if necessary. It was very hard to find plans for a proper bench at that time but I was lucky and found one in a British magazine, I think it was called Practical Woodwork or Popular Woodwork.

    It's hard maple. Over the years I added two other vises. One is a custom vise Jerry Fank made for me just after he started Jerry-Rig. I don't think he ever sold another of that design - it might be the only one. Recently I added an Emmert turtleback on the back.

    It's worked very well, so much so that I've never even considered making another. And now it's like an old friend. Wouldn't know what to do without it...
    Steve,

    The bench looks good after so many years of use.

    The portable thing is a hard nut to crack. That, portabiely, and wasteful use of wood are my biggest objections to the Roubo bench. Once built, as long as you do not need to move it, the Roubo works as well as any. Full disclosure: I have two Roubo based benches in my shop that are in use almost every day but if I ever need to move 'em my guess is they will be firewood.

    BTW, you are lucky. At least in my experience the first bench build will have so many faults that it will drive you to build another. It's good to get it right the first time.

    ken

  10. #295
    Steve,

    Great looking bench- is the tail vise mechanism wood or metal? Great vises all the way around. And is that an Agazanni in the background?

    Best,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  11. #296
    It appears that I too missed this thread somehow...

    Here are a couple of my Roubo based largely off the BC plans finished in 2013 I think.

    Ken, I will note that I built this bench by myself and it also breaks down. As a split-top, I could move the entire bench myself, no trouble. I decided to make the top solid after three years of not using the slot once and have had no regrets. Except briefly, when I moved to a new shop, but that only meant help from one other to move the top. (and for the record, I've never been described as burly...). Thus, I would recommend the BC bench bolts and their design for anyone attracted to a Roubo and are concerned that they might have to move the bench down the line.

    Can't really remember life without it and am still grateful to my friends Luke and Mike who supplied the wood

    The (long!) build is in this thread, including a retro-fit with the excellent chain drive vise from AYC:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....and-Bench-Dead

    In the old shop:
    IMG_4621.jpg

    IMG_4618.jpg
    IMG_4623.jpg

    And in the new shop:

    IMG_3351.jpg

    Best,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  12. #297
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    5,858
    Blog Entries
    7
    Nice bench Steve, good to see you on the board here.

    Very nice, Chris!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  13. #298
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Charles View Post
    It appears that I too missed this thread somehow...

    Here are a couple of my Roubo based largely off the BC plans finished in 2013 I think.

    Ken, I will note that I built this bench by myself and it also breaks down. As a split-top, I could move the entire bench myself, no trouble. I decided to make the top solid after three years of not using the slot once and have had no regrets. Except briefly, when I moved to a new shop, but that only meant help from one other to move the top. (and for the record, I've never been described as burly...). Thus, I would recommend the BC bench bolts and their design for anyone attracted to a Roubo and are concerned that they might have to move the bench down the line.

    Can't really remember life without it and am still grateful to my friends Luke and Mike who supplied the wood

    The (long!) build is in this thread, including a retro-fit with the excellent chain drive vise from AYC:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....and-Bench-Dead

    In the old shop:





    And in the new shop:

    Best,
    Chris
    Christ,

    Good looking build. I remember it from back when. Split slabs make the build much easier, the last bench I made with a split slab I made the slab asymmetrical and it works much better than the one with a symmetrical split slab. Never used bench bolts on any build, I can see the advantage if you expect to move the bench.

    ken

  14. Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Charles View Post
    Steve,

    Great looking bench- is the tail vise mechanism wood or metal? Great vises all the way around. And is that an Agazanni in the background?

    Best,
    Chris
    Metal.

    The plans I had found in that magazine called for metal ways. That suited me just fine. I'd had it with old, beat-up benches having tail vises on wooden ways that sagged ridiculously. That was one of the main reasons I wanted to make my own.

    Didn't have a way to fashion the metal ways but a machinist friend did it for me. $15.

    It consists of 3 1/2" plates, one with 1/4" tongues top and bottom, the other two grooved to match. Smooth and no sag in 45 years. Photos below.

    And yes, you're very observant, Agazzani B-20.




    20190606_213626.jpg

    20190606_213649.jpg

  15. #300
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    7,523
    Sometimes, one has to take the bench to the work...
    Project Project, helpers.JPG
    And, somedays...you need a saw bench at the same time...
    Porch Project, Mitre saw stand.JPG
    Plus a set of sawhorses...

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