Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Bronnze or steel?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Cape Coral, Florida
    Posts
    49
    Blog Entries
    1

    Bronnze or steel?

    Since you've given me such great responses on the corrugated sole question, here's another?

    Is the Bronze option on the LN #4 worth the extra money? I'm replacing several planes over time as well as adding a few new #'s. I do like the look of the bronze, but it isn't offered with many of LN 's other planes so it is worth it for the #4? I do have a huimidity problem in the shop which I am working to eliminate.

  2. #2
    I have the bronze LN4. The bronze will still oxidize, and will sometimes leave little streaks on the wood until the oxidation is worn off. Some don't mind the streaks, some do. I bought the bronze because it looked cool, and thought the extra 8oz would be nice. Although, I do not have a cast iron #4 to compare it to.
    “Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway”
    - John Wayne (1907-1979)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada
    Posts
    1,148
    If you have the extra $$, go with the bronze. It doesn't rust, it's a little heavyer and it does look cool!! Are you thinking of ging with the regular fog or one of the HA ones?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,178
    Quote Originally Posted by David Gendron View Post
    bronze... doesn't rust, it's a little heavier
    Both good enough reasons to go with it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    San Anselmo, CA
    Posts
    323
    try dropping a bronze plane and see what happens.................

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    24,893
    Blog Entries
    1
    Mark,
    Your profile does not show your location, so I do not know about the humidity in your area. My area is South West Washington. When it is dry around here you can still get wet if you drive fast with the windows down.

    I was worried about my cast iron planes. The ones that rusted were the ones left wrapped in newspaper. There has not been a problem with the ones left in the open air.

    Many of my planes were rustier when they were purchased than they are now.

    The old rust seems to be hygroscopic, pulls moisture from the air. Keeping an eye open for rust and taking precautions to prevent rust should keep your tools in good working order. Unless of course your humidity problems include standing water.

    jim
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Stony Plain, Alberta
    Posts
    2,702
    My vote would be for the bronze #4.
    I like the extra weight compared to my #4 iron.
    Bonus is it looks great in the stable.

    If it gets lonely get a #3 bronze to keep it company...
    And then there is also the #1 and #2 bronze to make the family.
    I don't have a big issue with humidity in my shop but still run a dehumidifier from late spring until fall.
    Does the trick for me.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    1,506
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Mason View Post
    try dropping a bronze plane and see what happens.................

    What happens?

  9. #9
    For me it's a no brainer: Steel
    Bronze wears out faster, and scratches and dents easier.

    Steel and cast iron are absolutely rust proof - if you use the tools.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,178
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliff Rohrabacher View Post
    For me it's a no brainer: Steel
    Bronze wears out faster, and scratches and dents easier.
    Well, even though it's softer than steel or iron, no one buying a bronze tool today is going to wear it out in his or her lifetime; same goes for their children and probably their children's children. We're talking metal here, not candlewax.

    Think of all the wood-bodied planes that are still around from one and two centuries ago, and wood's certainly softer than bronze.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Hampton Roads, Virginia
    Posts
    857
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Mark,

    I was worried about my cast iron planes. The ones that rusted were the ones left wrapped in newspaper. There has not been a problem with the ones left in the open air.
    jim
    Isn't newsprint fairly acidic?

    .
    Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened.
    - Churchill

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    410
    It is up to you, someone said "bronze doesn't rust" while technically correct (rust applies to iron only FeO2, FeO3...) Bronze does oxidize on the surface and it does leave stains on the wood.

    These stains are usually removed by the next couple of swipes, and of course once the oxidized layer is removed the plane does not stain anymore (until left unused for some time).

    If this will bother you too much, then go with steel, otherwise probably bronze has some pros, like weight and looks for some.

    I found that it bothers me enough to not warrant the bronze over the steel plane. Sometimes (specially on smoothers) you just want that final wispy shaving, and to see the wood stained... oh well... to each his own

    /p

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Dooling View Post
    Isn't newsprint fairly acidic?
    Oh yes.



    The message you have entered is too short. Please lengthen your message to at least 10 characters.

    This 10 character business is stifling my inner pith.

    CH

  14. #14
    For value for money, the ductile cast iron is a winner.
    For some people the look of the bronze plane is more attractive and its slightly heavier mass appeals. It might also look nicer on a shelf.
    You won't be disappointed with either, and if we are talking LN number 4's, I don't see the extra $50 value in the bronze.
    Which will be worth more in the future as a collectible? - probably the bronze.
    Remember that the Bedrock planes were only $0.50 extra against the regular Stanley Bailey planes at the same time, and yet were not as popular - read: not worth the extra $0.50.
    However which of these is the most sought after today? - the Bedrocks of course.
    Happy hunting
    MC
    Last edited by Martin Cash; 10-29-2009 at 9:56 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    San Anselmo, CA
    Posts
    323
    I dropped a bronze LN #4--it fell from my bench onto the concrete floor. The plane hit the floor directly in a cornor--and dented it enough such that even after LN tried to fix it (at no charge--excellent customer service), the corner dent made the plane unusable. Perhaps it might have been the same with a steel plane--I don't know? But as I tend to be clumbsy, I'll limit my risk by sticking with steel planes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •