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Thread: Plywood walls vs sheetrock

  1. #61
    Just to be different. - sheet rock. Looks clean and tidy. Easier to damage, but also easier to repair and cheaper. The only down side is hanging 'anywhere'. But is that really a big deal? Most things I have - I hang once and leave up for 10 years or longer so finding a stud is a very minor issue and cleat walls are often a better solution given their future proofing for areas that you may change up.
    Last edited by jeff norris 2011; 01-23-2020 at 2:18 PM.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by jeff norris 2011 View Post
    Just to be different. - sheet rock. Looks clean and tidy. Easier to damage, but also easier to repair and cheaper. The only down side is hanging 'anywhere'. But is that really a big deal? Most things I have once and leave up for 10 years or longer so finding a stud is a very minor incipience and cleat walls are often a better solution given their future proofing for areas that you may change up.
    I agree, sheetrock. It's easier to get it to "look good", and it's more easily paintable which makes a huge difference re lighting. But be sure to do all your wiring first. ;^)

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    4,506
    Painted plywood looks like painted plywood, to me. Painted sheetrock looks like painted sheetrock, to me. I don't care for either, but that's just my opinion.

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    Painted plywood looks like painted plywood, to me. Painted sheetrock looks like painted sheetrock, to me. I don't care for either, but that's just my opinion.
    Sheetrock doesn't burn so good, is cheaper, more easily paintable, and is easier to repair. If that matters at all.

  5. #65
    I used 1/2 sheetrock with 3/8 beadboard on top.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    585
    On this separator wall, why not plywood on the shop side and sheetrock on the car side.

    I have T-111 on my garage walls, painted white, it looks fine to me. It also overlaps on the edges, so that would stop the tiny amount of dust that may get through a joint area.

    For hanging heavy items, shelves, etc., I still go into the studs.
    Last edited by ChrisA Edwards; 01-23-2020 at 12:10 PM.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    257
    If I was putting plywood on the walls of a shop I would use screws, not nails. I think it would be faster and more secure. My current shop has drywall, someday when I build a shop I think plywood or OSB would be better for me. Not only for hanging things, but if I needed to add or change wiring at some point it would be easy enough to take out the screws and take the panels down where needed, and to put them back up again without damage. If the plywood joints are spaced correctly so that the edges are all on studs I would think that not much dust would get through.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Tucson, Aridzona
    Posts
    194
    All this wiring talk.. I'm in the process of building a shop, the wiring will all be surface mounted EMT. It's so much easier to deal with when you want to change things than pulling walls apart.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    All this wiring talk.. I'm in the process of building a shop, the wiring will all be surface mounted EMT. It's so much easier to deal with when you want to change things than pulling walls apart.
    When I built my shop I had 2 runs of 3/4 conduit from every square box run up to the attic so I can change whatever I want. I also had the electrician run conduit up from the panel box so changing things is easy. My walls are drywall and look great. Reflectance is excellent.

  10. #70
    I, too, down-fed all of my wiring in the shop but I used the plywood set vertically for the walls. I did not use the conduit as a result. In the four years I've had the shop I have only opened a section of wall once, but with the screws it took me about 20 minutes to get into that section of wall and that was mostly getting to the wall, not into it. Once the gas line was run the wall was buttoned back up to look like new. I would use plywood again

  11. #71
    Tom, what do you like to use? I don't necessarily like them either but not too sure of other options so just wondering. Did you use sheetrock on the homes you built but still just don't like it or did you do something else? Thanks!

    Jonathan

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Bloomington, IL
    Posts
    5,959
    I did diy slat wall in plywood I painted. I can put anything I want anywhere. I like it lots more than my drywalled other shop walls. I used marine grade plywood from craigslist. Got the wood deal first before that was a wall option.
    Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
    Posts
    4,477
    I reco Ply for walls and sheetrock for ceiling after insulation....
    Jerry

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Eastern Iowa
    Posts
    483
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Greathouse View Post
    Wayne

    I used a router with a wide shop-made base and a 1/4" grooving bit. I routed grooves in both sides of the boards and then I cut strips from 1/4" plywood for floating tongues. I like the way it turned out and have left it natural for now.

    Here's a link to a thread I had posted previously. You can see the wall in the background in the first two pictures. Sorry, but I didn't take and pictures of the install.
    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=98520
    mmmmm.. link says I don’t have permission to view. Did I neglect to say, “pretty please”?

  15. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Velasquez View Post
    mmmmm.. link says I don’t have permission to view.
    Same here.


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