Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: 15 gauge or 16 gauge?

  1. #1

    Question 15 gauge or 16 gauge?

    I already own an 18 gauge brad nailer and stapler. I intend to be building a lot of cabinets in the near future. Should I invest in a 15 or 16 gauge nailer. I intend to buy both eventually, but what would be more effective right now in the short run to get me started?
    Member - Uncle Sam's Misguided Children '82-'85.
    Once, Now Former, But Always!

    "Among individuals, as among nations, the respect for the other's rights brings peace."
    Benito Juarez

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Knoxville TN.
    Posts
    2,667
    Aurelio,

    You don't say what you are going to use it for? I have the Porter Cable 15ga and love it. There have been a couple of times I wished I had a heavier gage like a 16 but for the most part for what I do, it takes care of. I don't do any crown molding, only cabinets and other things so I don't need the angled body of a 16ga. For overall use I would vote for the 15ga unless you are going to do a lot of remodeling soon.

    Good luck
    Dick

    No Pain-No Gain- Not!
    No Pain-Good

  3. #3
    The difference is minimal. I have had both...currently I have a 16ga PC 2.5" nailer. No need for the angled one unless you just like them better. Mine shoots crown perfectly (I just turn the gun sideways...).

    PS....the smaller the number the larger the guage is...15 is bigger than 16...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    47,762
    There is a real difference between the 16 guage and 15 gauge nailers...the fasteners, themselves. The 16 guage guns are still brad nailers and shoot flat, stamped fasteners. The 15 guage angle gun shoots real nails--they are round and have most of a round head. The latter gun will provide a lot more holding power and the angle design also makes it easy to get into tight places. Frankly, I use the 15 guage angle nailer a lot in furniture and cabinetry work and prefer it over the brad gun when the nails are not tool large for the job. My combination of guns includes a 23 guage pinner, and 18 guage brad gun, a 15 guage angle nailer and a 1/4" narror crown stapler. I have never wished for a 16 guage brad gun. That said, for anyone only able to get a single gun, a 16 gauge unit is a great compromise between the smaller 18 guage tool and a 15 guage nailer. IMHO, of course.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    831
    Quote Originally Posted by aurelio alarcon
    I intend to be building a lot of cabinets in the near future. Should I invest in a 15 or 16 gauge nailer.
    Neither. What do you need brads or nails for when building cabinetry? The only time *I* might want nails is if you don't want to clamp a face frame on or simply cannot due to size or location/installation. 18 ga is all you want for that. For the casework...you don't need nails...though if you feel the plywood/plywood joint needs metal fastener reinforcement, screws are probably the better choice than nails. I know drawers are oft stapled together....but that is in a production shop turning out mediocre quality cabinetry. I've not a plethora of experience and I'm always willing to learn...so I'm seriously asking what you need nails for when building cabinetry?

    For trim carpentry, my 18 and 15 ga guns get used a lot more than my 16 ga gun.
    Tim


    on the neverending quest for wood.....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Parr
    Aurelio,

    You don't say what you are going to use it for? I have the Porter Cable 15ga and love it. There have been a couple of times I wished I had a heavier gage like a 16 but for the most part for what I do, it takes care of. I don't do any crown molding, only cabinets and other things so I don't need the angled body of a 16ga. For overall use I would vote for the 15ga unless you are going to do a lot of remodeling soon.

    Good luck
    I thought 15 gauge was heavier than 16.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM USA
    Posts
    518
    When I bought my 15g nailer my Dad gave me very similar advice that Jim just gave. Since I already had an 18g brad nailer, the 16g would not offer much difference in fastener type. Heavier brads, yes, but still brads. I went with the Craftsman 15g angled finish nailer.

    Pete
    "Last year we couldn't win at home. This year we can't win on the road.
    My failure as a coach is that I can't think of any other place to play."
    - Harry Neale, Vancouver Canucks

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    2,296
    !5 is heavier than 16.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Sproul
    Neither. What do you need brads or nails for when building cabinetry? The only time *I* might want nails is if you don't want to clamp a face frame on or simply cannot due to size or location/installation. 18 ga is all you want for that. For the casework...you don't need nails...though if you feel the plywood/plywood joint needs metal fastener reinforcement, screws are probably the better choice than nails. I know drawers are oft stapled together....but that is in a production shop turning out mediocre quality cabinetry. I've not a plethora of experience and I'm always willing to learn...so I'm seriously asking what you need nails for when building cabinetry?

    For trim carpentry, my 18 and 15 ga guns get used a lot more than my 16 ga gun.
    Location is the reason that I will be purchasing one. I will be doing some work on site and cannot leave it clamped up like I do when I make furniture here at home. I will be doing a lot of cabinets. It is just not feasable to have that many clamps. Based on this thread, I will probably get a 15 gauge nailer.
    Member - Uncle Sam's Misguided Children '82-'85.
    Once, Now Former, But Always!

    "Among individuals, as among nations, the respect for the other's rights brings peace."
    Benito Juarez

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Harbin
    When I bought my 15g nailer my Dad gave me very similar advice that Jim just gave. Since I already had an 18g brad nailer, the 16g would not offer much difference in fastener type. Heavier brads, yes, but still brads. I went with the Craftsman 15g angled finish nailer.

    Pete
    I will probably get the new magnesium Craftsman 15 gauge angled finish nailer myself. Thanks. Jim's advice does make a lot of sense. And since I already have an 18 gauge brad nailer and 18 gauge stapler, I'll go with the 15 gauge nailer.
    Member - Uncle Sam's Misguided Children '82-'85.
    Once, Now Former, But Always!

    "Among individuals, as among nations, the respect for the other's rights brings peace."
    Benito Juarez

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    831
    I have the SB 15 gauge. It has done everything I've asked without a single hiccup. I also like the oilless feature on their 15 ga gun....though that can be problematic if you run an oiled gun with an in-line oiler. Oil in an oilless gun will quickly ruin the gun.
    Tim


    on the neverending quest for wood.....

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM USA
    Posts
    518
    Aurelio,

    That's the one I bought. I'll be retrimming our entire house with new baseboards and door trim once I finish laying tile. I haven't used my new 15g yet (Just picked it up about a week ago...and...I'm still laying tile) but I have used my Dad's. It's a nice nailer, and is very light.

    Pete
    "Last year we couldn't win at home. This year we can't win on the road.
    My failure as a coach is that I can't think of any other place to play."
    - Harry Neale, Vancouver Canucks

  13. #13
    I have all the gauges. Most used is the 18ga. in and out of the shop. Also use the 16ga. some.
    Less used is the 15ga. This gun is used mostly when trimming out a house with pine molding and the painters are right behind me. It does a lot better job of holding as like Jim says, it is more of a real nail with a head on it. I do not use it in the shop on cabinets, as my boxes are screwed together.

    Steve


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Harrisville, PA
    Posts
    1,696
    Hi Aerelio,

    For onsite work consider the Senco AF 41 (15 gauge)or the Paslode gun (16 gauge) that uses the gas cartridges. I really like my senco. These were the top two tailless guns in the "Fine Homebuilding" test. not having to drag out the compressor sure is nice, especiall for small jobs. The Paslode was rated tops for faster fire rate and the Senco could not countersink the 2 1/2 inch nial into solid oak. I have had no problems with the Senco and have not needed to counter sink the 2.5" nail into solid oak. It sticks out maybe 1/8 inch (had to at least try it) and I don't use the finish nailer like a roofing nailer so the rapid fire is a non issue as well. The senco cartridges have a 6 month shelf life or so and you still need to maintain a battery. If it will be an every day tool I would get the Paslode however.

    My 2 cents
    Chuck

    When all else fails increase hammer size!
    "You can know what other people know. You can do what other people can do."-Dave Gingery

  15. #15

    Pete?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Harbin
    Aurelio,

    That's the one I bought. I'll be retrimming our entire house with new baseboards and door trim once I finish laying tile. I haven't used my new 15g yet (Just picked it up about a week ago...and...I'm still laying tile) but I have used my Dad's. It's a nice nailer, and is very light.

    Pete
    Are you referring to the Craftsman light weight magnesium 15 gauge nailer?
    Member - Uncle Sam's Misguided Children '82-'85.
    Once, Now Former, But Always!

    "Among individuals, as among nations, the respect for the other's rights brings peace."
    Benito Juarez

Similar Threads

  1. Kreg miter gauge... Opinions??
    By Brian Hale in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-19-2004, 2:49 PM
  2. Mitre gauge advice
    By Zahid Naqvi in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 06-11-2004, 7:12 PM
  3. Lee Valley Marking Gauge
    By Mark Singer in forum General Woodworking and Power Tools
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-04-2004, 6:03 PM
  4. Freud Marking Gauge
    By James Carmichael in forum Neanderthal Haven
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-23-2004, 8:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •