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Thread: Twisted fence on new table saw. Problem?

  1. #1

    Twisted fence on new table saw. Problem?

    While setting up my new Grizzly G0690 table saw (I'll post more fully on that later) I noticed that the fence is twisted. Not twisted like a pretzel, but enough to notice. It creates a gap of roughly 25 thousandths of an inch gap, or about the thickness of my metal rule. The attached pictures show the front (square) and the back (flush at top, gap at bottom) -- it's easier to see if you click on the thumbnails.

    This is my first real table saw, so I'm not really sure how concerned I should be about this. Is this a problem I need to contact Grizzly about, or is it just an acceptable imperfection that won't impact performance or safety?

    Thanks in advance.

    2009 Jul 11 014.jpg

    2009 Jul 11 013.jpg
    Last edited by Matt Stiegler; 07-12-2009 at 12:35 PM.

  2. #2
    You could. What's the worst that could happen they blow you off?
    What's the best: You get a warp free fence?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    Rochester, NY
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    Matt - It looks to me like much of the discrepancy could be adjusted out by raising the left side of the fence a bit at the "T". The rest could be adjusted by a small shim (often tape) between the face and fence tube.

    I realize these are things that we'd prefer not to have to deal with, butting pushing for a new fence seems extreme at this point, and expensive for the supplier, which ultimately falls back on everyone else. I'd try adjustments first, then pursue replacement if that fails.

    Good luck!
    Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

  4. #4
    It will definitely effect performance. It may also create an unsafe condition, by pulling the cut off piece into the rising rear teeth of the saw blade. With thicker pieces, which will index higher on the fence, it could push the captive portion into the saw blade, increasing the chance of kick back. At the very least, it will introduce inaccuracies and burn spots into your projects.

    You could try shimming the fence, but I suspect that sharing that photo with CS will result in
    1.) a procedure to repair or
    2.) a new fence

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Boston, MA
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    Whats causing this? Is the fence face flat or twisted. Put a straight edge across the face with the fence lying on its side. My b-meyer style fence has a couple of phenolic pads that the fence sits on which helps it glide across the cast iron. Could these pads be uneven? My fence was slightly out of 90 degrees and putting a piece of tape under one of the plastic pads fixed the problem.

    This needs to get fixed and I wouldn't hesitate to call grizzly.


    ~mark
    Last edited by Mark Carlson; 07-12-2009 at 1:58 PM.

  6. #6
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    S.E. Tennessee ... just a bit North of Chattanooga
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    Mine had the same condition, but since I was the manufacturer I chose the shim method and it's worked just fine. Remove the plastic face .. apply layers of tape to the low spots every couple of inches till the square reads true .. replace the face & check again. You may have to do this 2 or 3 times, but it will get you a fence that is more square than just about any will ever be, out-of-the-box.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    I paid $400.00 in 1986 for a parallock saw fence of extruded aluminum. It had a bit of twist. Sent it back. they sent another,same twist. Shim your fence's face and be done with it if Grizzly sends you another of the same.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Minneapolis, Minnesota
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    My real, made-in-America Biesemeyer is the same way. It has never been enough of a problem to affect my woodworking/carpentry projects.

    If it ever does, however, the paper shim or masking tape method is likely the way to go.

    Jason

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Stiegler View Post
    While setting up my new Grizzly G0690 table saw (I'll post more fully on that later) I noticed that the fence is twisted. Not twisted like a pretzel, but enough to notice. It creates a gap of roughly 25 thousandths of an inch gap, or about the thickness of my metal rule. The attached pictures show the front (square) and the back (flush at top, gap at bottom) -- it's easier to see if you click on the thumbnails.

    This is my first real table saw, so I'm not really sure how concerned I should be about this. Is this a problem I need to contact Grizzly about, or is it just an acceptable imperfection that won't impact performance or safety?

    Thanks in advance.

    2009 Jul 11 014.jpg

    2009 Jul 11 013.jpg
    Last edited by Jason White; 07-12-2009 at 3:23 PM.

  9. #9
    Thanks for all the helpful responses. Mark's question (why didn't I think of that?) sent me back to look at the fence more carefully, and it now seems clear that the issue is not that the fence itself is twisted, but rather that the phenolic face is not flat. It has minor dips and waves along its entire face. I don't have much experience with phenolic, so I don't know if that's typical. Anyhow, once I recognized that, I was able to adjust the fence in a way that seemed to improve things somewhat.

    I'm going to contact Grizz tomorrow and will post again with their response. Thanks again.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    2,097
    Is it hot in your shop? Plastic moves quite a bit in high heat. Could be part of the problem.



    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Stiegler View Post
    Thanks for all the helpful responses. Mark's question (why didn't I think of that?) sent me back to look at the fence more carefully, and it now seems clear that the issue is not that the fence itself is twisted, but rather that the phenolic face is not flat. It has minor dips and waves along its entire face. I don't have much experience with phenolic, so I don't know if that's typical. Anyhow, once I recognized that, I was able to adjust the fence in a way that seemed to improve things somewhat.

    I'm going to contact Grizz tomorrow and will post again with their response. Thanks again.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Stiegler View Post
    I don't have much experience with phenolic, so I don't know if that's typical.
    For the record, I think it is fairly typical. I've seen plenty of phenolic potato chips.

  12. #12
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    Matt - Just to be certain, is the face of that fence phenolic, or is it HPDE plastic? Griz's website side HDPE (high density polyethylene), and it can be flattened on a jointer if shimming isn't doing the trick, but I'd definitely try shimming it first.
    Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Mid Missouri (Brazito/Henley)
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    Tweaking with *chewing gum & bailing wire* or masking tape & paper shims IS still alive and well even in this *digital age!*

    I would not even dare think some machine could be shipped from China to a woodworker's front door, without some minor (or Not So Minor) tweaking and adjusting.

    Expensive machinery (CNC routers) have a service tech *set it up* for the customer. The customer pays for this *set up* in the huge price tag of the machine. We get a bargain from Grizzly, and set the machine up ourselves.

    Something as basic as a saw fence face stuck onto a metal tube should never be assumed *perfect.* The right shims in the right place will yield a straight, square edge. Look at it as a *learning experience!* rather than a defect.
    [/SIGPIC]Necessisity is the Mother of Invention, But If it Ain't Broke don't Fix It !!

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