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Thread: Fettling A Plane from Junker to Jointer

  1. #31
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    Can't Keep an Old Fettler Down

    This is just to link to information about Stanley shoulder planes.

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=119301

    jim
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #32
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    Fettling A Low Angle Block Plane

    This is a link to Fettle to the Metal on LA Blocks.

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...05#post1246005

    jim
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #33
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    Advanced Fettling, Repairing Stripped Threads.

    Another installment, this one includes repairing threads that are stripped out at the tote.

    Also covered is shavings at the sides but nothing in the middle.

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...70#post1339970

    jim
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #34
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    Forever Fettling, Waiting for the #113

    For all you folks who just can get enough fettling in your daily diet there is a new installment in the long running saga. This may be a funny looking plane and it usually does not leave a flat surface.


    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...97#post1515997

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post

    The cap iron should be set about 1/32" above the cutting edge of the blade. This is not real critical. Usually it should seat parallel to the edge. If all else is well and it is off a little from square, it is not something over which one should lose any sleep.
    As it turns out with new information made available, the cap iron does quite a lot to produce the surface we all love to see on our work.

    Some suggest setting it as close as 0.004" from the blades edge.

    Well, my setting was only off by about 0.027".

    The smaller setting if for taking fine shavings. For hogging off wood the chip breaker may do better a bit further back from the blade.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #36
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    Aug 2007
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    You have a store bought bench?

    I'd never thought it.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    You have a store bought bench?

    I'd never thought it.
    At the time my shop was in our very small garage. My work bench was a Work-Mate from Black & Decker. They went on sale and I decided to go for it. It was about half of what the same bench goes for now.

    I do have the wood to make a bench, but so many other things keep coming up every time I try to get some more done on building one. It is still in process.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Australia
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    Excellent restoration tutorial Jim. It just proves that these older planes have still much to offer when finely tuned and fettled.

    Here is a couple of articles from the Paul Sellers blog that indeed reinforces this view point.

    Stewie;

    https://paulsellers.com/2014/01/plane-work-consider/

    https://paulsellers.com/2014/01/ques...ld-new-planes/

  9. #39
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    Here is a couple of articles from the Paul Sellers blog that indeed reinforces this view point.
    A couple of videos gave me a less than warm and fuzzy feeling about Paul Sellers. These two articles at least warmed me up a bit to the man.

    My preference and advice is to try using the tools that our woodworking forefathers used.

    Some folks seem to get frozen with fear that they will somehow destroy a valued antiquity. If they were some highly valued antiquities, they wouldn't be selling on ebay for $50 or less.

    Aside from the practical side of saving some money we must realize there are those in our community who may have no experience using hand tools or power tools of any kind.

    The audience here is diverse. We likely have some who have taken part in chopping down trees to build and furnish a cabin to those who have entered this world in the computer age where the pen and pencil are becoming all but obsolete.

    In a lot of cases there isn't a vast wealth of knowledge being passed on through the generations. My memory of using a hammer and nails goes back to about the age of four or five. My understanding of the proper usage of a hammer to avoid bending nails wasn't discovered until reading something in my forties or early fifties. It was just a short paragraph about keeping one's elbow in the plane of the nail's head. After that I built something and drove over two hundred 16d nails and bent only one when it hit a knot. Before that little bit of information I would likely have bent about a third of them.

    The old adage holds, it isn't the tool as much as it is the person using the tool.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #40
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    Oct 2010
    Location
    Australia
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    Hi Jim. I couldn't agree more.

    One of the points that Paul Sellers mention's within 1 of these articles offers a very valid message.

    (quote); Sometimes we have false expectations and when we meet the new-day woodworking sales outlets and staff, you are all too often presented with a very false representation of real woodworking. A stick of maple held in a vise with perfect grain orientation is far from what you get on the rim of a box or the frame of a door. This is not really very realistic at all, but at the bench at a show the demo’s can look very convincing.

    Stewie;
    Last edited by Stewie Simpson; 11-16-2014 at 10:32 PM.

  11. #41
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    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
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    https://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/...Stanley_Planes


    I've replaced cap irons and never regretted doing it.

  12. #42
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    Jun 2010
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    Depends on the cap iron, though...IMG_2599 (640x480).jpg one size does not fit all....

    Was also the problem on Woodriver planes.....and they had to go with the V3 ones.

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