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Thread: Jointer not Jointing so well...

  1. #1

    Unhappy Jointer not Jointing so well...

    Hello. Newbie to the forum and to woodworking. I purchased a Jointer (6") and I am running 23 inch long oak pieces through it. From what I can tell, the machine is set up correctly (I checked it with squares) but when I run the wood through it, my results are bad. I want to get a straight edge so I can glue up the oak to make a panel so I take the side that has a arch (low on the ends and high in the middle) or is fairly straight already and run it through. What I end up with is a bow, Low on the ends and high in the middle. For the life of me, I can't figure it out. Does anyone have any tips or a reason why this is happening to me? Being new to the machine, I have not ruled out operator error. Thanks

  2. #2
    Maybe your outfeed table is too much lower than the blade tip level.

    Here's a crude image of what I mean for the outfeed table:

    I'm not sure if it's recommended that the level be matched or how much of a measurement the outfeed table should be lower than the blade cutter, but it's going to be a small amount.

    For mine, I put a straight edge on the outfeed table and have it go over the blades. Rotate the blades by hand and see if it kisses each blade consistently. Boy it took me a good hour or two to get my 6" Delta setup...
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  3. #3
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    I'm with Chris. The symptoms you state sound like your outfeed is too low or sloping away from the cutter head. Bring your infeed up to TDC of the cutter head, lay a long straightedge across and check for the elusive "flat".
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  4. #4
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    I've been told to keep the outfeed table about .0001" lower than the knives.
    Make sure you put pressure on the outfeed side of the stock. Don't force the wood down in the middle when you have a bow in it. Let the machine do the ends first. You will know when it is jointing the entire board.
    Never, under any circumstances, consume a laxative and sleeping pill, on the same night

  5. #5
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    What type of jointer are you using? I had a problem with my grizzly for a while until I figured out what was going on.

    PS

  6. #6
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    The other possible explanation is that you are rocking the board through the cut -- i.e. putting pressure on the front as it passes over the cutter, and then shifting pressure to the back and in the process rocking the board on the high point in the middle.

  7. #7
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    I seriously doubt that many woodworkers have any means of measuring .0001"- a ten thousanth of an inch. Work of that tolerance is hard enough to achieve in a well equipped machine shop. To work to that kind of tolerance,precision grinding machines come into the picture,because the surface of the work has to be quite smooth to even measure that kind of tolerance meaningfully.

  8. #8
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    I have a 6" Craftsman jointer that commences the problem you describe when my blades begin to dull. This jointer's outfeed table has no adjustment at all. When I install sharp blades, the bowing ceases immediately. When bowing begins again, I know the blades need changing.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by george wilson View Post
    I seriously doubt that many woodworkers have any means of measuring .0001"- a ten thousanth of an inch. Work of that tolerance is hard enough to achieve in a well equipped machine shop. To work to that kind of tolerance,precision grinding machines come into the picture,because the surface of the work has to be quite smooth to even measure that kind of tolerance meaningfully.
    Sorry. I meant .001"
    Never, under any circumstances, consume a laxative and sleeping pill, on the same night

  10. #10
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    No woodworking tool commonly found in shops causes as much trouble as a jointer. Between critical alignment and feed technique it takes a while to get it right. Like others here said, check you tables for co-planer adjustment and knife height. Proper feed technique is to only hold the wood to the infeed table long enough to get a few inches onto the outfeed side. Then only apply downward pressure on the outfeed table. If your jointer is adjusted correctly the board will likely be flat. One other suggestion. From your description it sounds like your starting on the wrong side of the board. My understanding is the concave side should be first through the jointer. That way the board won't rock as you continue feeding. Maybe I just misunderstood.

  11. #11
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    One thing I can tell you that i recently learned even though I think I was told before.

    Don't put to much force on the wood. Just a little to make it stay on the table and against the fence.

    If you press to hard you will not be able to keep the same force through the entire stroke. I have tested this recently where I would put a board through lightly pressed to the table and it would joint very well and then I would put it through again but this time pressing down hard and it will get screwed up.

  12. #12
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    I had problems from the start with my 6" grizzly. I had it set to remove less than 1/32 but got terrible chip out and it seemed to make an incredible amount of shavings for removing a minimal amount of wood. After some head scratching, I noticed that the indicator reading <1/32 was loose and not at all accurate; I had been removing quite a bit more material but I just didnt notice right away.

    ps

  13. #13
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    Mark,

    Last year before I started a rather large maple milling and panel glue project, I decided to purchase an instructional DVD for jointers and planers. In fact, I purchased a DVD that folks on this site suggested. I can't tell you how valuable the instruction was for not only both the jointer and planer secrets, but also a section on proper technique for gluing panels. I highly recommend purchasing "Jointer and Planer Secrets" from Hendrik Varju, owner of Passion for Wood. Great easy to understand lessons that will teach you more than you knew existed!
    Good luck.... Terry

    http://www.passionforwood.com/index.htm .
    Last edited by Terry Achey; 03-11-2009 at 8:46 PM.


  14. #14
    Thanks everyone. I have a Delta jointer 6 inch. It seems the consensus is if the machine is in adjustment, raise the outfeed just a little bit and then get the "feel" of when to adjust pressure from the infeed to the outfeed. I will try it this weekend and see what happens. Just to make sure, when I start to push, I should guide the wood into the jointer from the infeed and then when a few inches go through the infeed, apply a gentle downward pressure to the out feed.

    Thanks again!

  15. #15
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    That is pretty much it. Good luck.
    Never, under any circumstances, consume a laxative and sleeping pill, on the same night

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