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Thread: repeatable length miter cuts on the table saw

  1. #1
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    repeatable length miter cuts on the table saw

    It seems like everyone agrees that using a miter gauge on the table saw, with the rip fence as a length stop is a big no-no. So, if you are going to crosscut a bunch of small pieces from one board on the table saw (say blocks for an end grain cutting board), how do you accurately repeat their length without using it?

    Would one option be to attach a small stop block to the rip fence that you can use to position the board each time, but that isn't long enough to extend parallel to the blade? You would be counting on the wood not slipping left or right as you cut it, but I think this might work.

    I feel like there's an easy way out there I just haven't been told about yet, hopefully someone's got it.

    thanks,
    Andy

  2. #2
    your second paragraph is what I do

  3. #3
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    There are stops you can get that fit on the miter gauges made by Inca.Some old saws had them. My 1963 Dewalt TABLE saw has such. Otherwise,place a wide slab of wood against the fence,and adjust the fence till the slab of wood serves as your stop. Place the slab of wood so it is well ahead of the blade. The slab of wood needs to be wide enough that the pieces you ae cutting off cannot go diagonal,and catch between he fence and the revolving blade. Be careful to not let the cut pieces pile up and get in the way. BE CAREFUL OF THE INCA miter guages. ANY aluminium anodized miter gauge is very slippery,letting the wood slip sideways a bit while cutting. Screw a straight piece of wood over the miter gauge's face.
    Last edited by george wilson; 02-02-2009 at 1:57 PM.

  4. #4
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    Wink

    Incra 2000 SE. Has the stops for relatively short cuts. Just got thru cuttin' some 29" table legs with mine.
    Bill
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

  5. #5
    If the repeating pieces are going to be on the opposite side of the blade from your miter guage, then I recommend using a crosscut sled instead. The crosscut sled will fully support the cutoff throughout the cut and reduce the chance of it skewing and jamming between the blade and fence.

  6. #6
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    I have a miter sled for my table saw but most of the time I use my sliding miter saw with Kreg stops. There are a lot of plans for a sled available.

  7. #7
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    Yup I use the stop block on the fence method and have never had a problem with it. To prevent slipping attach a piece of solid wood to the fence. To kick it up a notch, use some spray adhesive to attach a strip of 180 grit sandpaper to the wood. Gives you a positive grip on your piece without having to try to use a death grip to hold it.
    good luck,
    JeffD

  8. #8
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    I thought everyone used a stop block ;-)
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Pratt View Post
    ...Would one option be to attach a small stop block to the rip fence that you can use to position the board each time, but that isn't long enough to extend parallel to the blade?
    Yep!

    I have a 1-2-3 setup block (precision ground metal block that measures 1" high, 2" wide, 3" long) that sits in a drawer in my undertable cabinet. When I need to make repeated short cutoffs, I set the fence to blade distance 1" greater than the cutoff. The block against the fence, the workpiece against the miter gage and butted against the block. Move the gage and workpiece through the blade leaving the setup block behind. Simple, safe, repeatable.

    You would be counting on the wood not slipping left or right as you cut it, but I think this might work. ...
    A strip of sandpaper glued to the miter fence takes care of that problem.

    (Now I'll go read the other replies and see how many present the same or similar solution)

    Edit: Should have mentioned that I use this technique for relatively short cutoffs at the table saw. For long cutoffs, as Bill mentioned for the table legs, a stop block on the miter fence is a better solution if a crosscut sled or miter saw isn't available.
    Last edited by Tom Veatch; 02-02-2009 at 2:41 PM.
    Tom Veatch
    Wichita, KS
    USA

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Thompson View Post
    If the repeating pieces are going to be on the opposite side of the blade from your miter guage, then I recommend using a crosscut sled instead. The crosscut sled will fully support the cutoff throughout the cut and reduce the chance of it skewing and jamming between the blade and fence.
    Ditto. .
    I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger....then it hit me.

  11. #11
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    Andy,

    I've had the same problem. I make picture frames (as a hobby). I use a Rockler version of the Dubby. I can make repeatable miter cuts all day long.


    Joe
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
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    replies

    Thanks for the replies everyone. Seems like the stop block on the rip fence thing is the way to go, great to always be able to get quick answers like this on the site.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Pratt View Post
    I feel like there's an easy way out there I just haven't been told about yet, hopefully someone's got it.
    Yet another reason a sliding table saw is the way to go.

  14. #14
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    You've got lots of choices, but if your pieces are going to be small I suggest something like a stop rod on a sled. Small pieces can be lifted by the blade wind on miter saws, then the blade will send it flying. Same can happen with a miter gage. Whatever you do, don't keep pressure against any stop while cutting. It's a stop...Not a fence!


  15. #15
    great extension rod idea and pic, thanks.

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