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Thread: Are there any Trim Routers that can...

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Question Are there any Trim Routers that can...

    I'm looking for a trim router that has a fence like the Festool Router.... where the router is parallel to the surface??? (See pic below)

    I'm building a bunch of bookshelves for my wife... and the shelves will be plywood with a 1 1/4" hardwood trim. I want to use the trim router to bring the hardwood trim flush with the plywood (using a flush trim bit).

    I don't have the money for the Festool.

    NOTE: My Makita does have this type of fence BUT the design is such that the router bit can only extend ~3/4" before hitting the fence :-( and I need ~1 1/2"


    Thanks for your help!!!


    -jj
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    Last edited by joseph j shields; 01-22-2009 at 11:49 PM.

  2. #2
    Check this one out. It has a tilting base. I'm not sure how much it tilts. They also have a toll free number that you can call for tech support, if I'm not mistaken.

    http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops...n1_router.html
    Stephen Edwards
    Hilham, TN 38568

    "Build for the joy of it!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Most router bases have removeable plastic faces. The faces are secured with machine screws running into tapped holes. You can make use of the tapped holes to attach fences, or to attach a right-angle fence. You make said fences from wood. That is, most any trim router will serve your purpose.

  4. #4
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    Cave Creek, AZ - near Phoenix
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    Quote Originally Posted by joseph j shields View Post
    ...NOTE: My Makita does have this type of fence BUT the design is such that the router bit can only extend ~3/4" before hitting the fence :-( and I need ~1 1/2" ...
    Not to be difficult, but... Are you sure you want to make a 1-1/2" deep cut with a trim router that typically has a 1/4" collet?
    Dave Falkenstein aka Daviddubya
    Cave Creek, AZ

  5. #5
    I use a router in its normal orientation and use a jig which bridges the attached trim. A fence holds the bit to the stock. I have cut 1" wide trim with this set-up quite perfectly. It'll only cost you some scraps and a large enough bit to cut the trim you place on the ply. It wors great on flat stock--curved stock will require the festool approach or a shop made version as Jamie stated.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
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    If you are just flushing up the edging pop for $40 for a stanley #80 cabinet scraper. I use it for edging all the time and just did two desk tops that had over 2" edging all around (total of about 18' on each x2) and it is very fast and easy with almost no chance of burning through the veneer.

    Otherwise you can just stand a router on end with a simple jig clamped to the piece.

    As mentioned above, even a trim cut at 1.5" is a pretty big cut for a lightweight trim router with minimal support.

    How long are the shelves? I have also done kitchen's worth of banded shelves (although not 1.5" but that shouldn't matter here) with a tall fence and a flush trim in a shaper or router table.

    Joe
    JC Custom WoodWorks

    For best results, try not to do anything stupid.

    "So this is how liberty dies...with thunderous applause." - Padmé Amidala "Star Wars III: The Revenge of the Sith"

  7. #7
    I set up a router table where the router and cutter are parallel to the floor (Not perpendicular as in a normal router table). I can just slide the shelves through and trim them. If you are doing a lot of this type work, it may be worthwhile to build one. I do this on every plywood project I build, so it is worthwhile.

    There are plans in Wood Magazine. If you really want to know the issue, PM me, as it took awhile to search for it last time.

  8. #8
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    Your explanation of your problem seems to only be clear to yourself. I think that you have put a facing on your shelf board that is 3/4 thick and 1 1/2 high and you want to trim off the top edge of this facing so that it is level with the top surface of your shelf. If this is your problem, the following paragraph should be of help.

    A flush trim bit with a cutting edge longer than the thickness of your trim board with a bearing on the end chucked in any 1-2 hp router can easily do this. A laminate trimmer can be used, but it isn't necessary. Stand your shelf upright and clamp it so that it stands solidly on it's back edge. Then place the router's base on the trim piece with the bit on the side of the shelf that needs trimming. If the router isn't stable enough for you to use this way, place and clamp a scrap piece of wood and a 2x4 spacer on the side of the shelf that you want to trim so that the top edge of the scrap piece is the same height as your shelf. The 2x4 spacer needs to be located several inches below and between the shelf and the scrap so that there is adequate clearance for your router bit. You should end up with 2 board edges to ride your router on (your shelf and the piece of scrap), separated by a gap (2x4 thickness). You can then easily slide your router along the top edges, with the bit in the gap, and cut your trim board flush with the top side of your shelf. The bearing will ride on the top face of the shelf and the bit will cut the excess off your face trim piece.

    Charley

  9. #9
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    All of my shelves get a either a 1" solid face for behind doors, or a 1-1/4" face for open shelves. I nail the face on, the take two shelves and put them face to face and clamp the joint. They only have to sit about 10 minutes, just enough for it to tack and hold. I just belt sand the excess glue and the little bit of lip down to the surface of the veneer. I then belt sand the whole shelf, follow up with an orbital.

    If you must use a flush trim bit, just use a couple of Jorgensons, or something similar to hold the shelf on edge. An 1-1/4" face won't be that hard to hold the router flat to.

  10. #10
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    I regularly flush up hardwood edging on plywood just as Charley wrote above.

    I also have such a thing set up on my router table. I just install a tall fence and raise it up just enough to clear the edging being trimmed. Then one just flushes up the tall fence with the trim bit (it may have a bearing on it or not...doesn't necessarily need one in this case) and slides the work to be trimmed right through.

    Sometimes it is easier on the router table (push the wood through the tool) and sometimes it is easier pushing the router through the wood.
    Wood: a fickle medium....

    Did you know SMC is user supported? Please help.

  11. #11
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    +2 for Charley. What I do the provide additional router base stability is clamp two shelves together and trim rout the outside edges then re-index the boards and trim the other edge.

    Don't know if you have a surface planer but I find it best to size the edge banding as close as possible to the ply thickness. I then use some clamp blocks (found the design in Wood mag.) that use a piece of the ply as a spacer. Once glued it only takes light sanding to flush up the banding and ply (I can provide a pic of the clamp block tonight if needed).

    Mike

  12. #12
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    I'm assuming the edging will be hanging down, the 1-1/4" will be the face that is showing?

  13. #13
    I use a lipping plate, made by Pat Warner. Pic shown is a plate on a 7537 series router. Was too big to use, so I got another plate and put it on a 690 series router. Not near as heavy, easier to use.

    I use a 1-1/4" flat, flush cut whiteside bit in it. Plate will also take a 1-1/2" bit.
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