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    Patrick Walsh

    1986 Altendorf F45

    Thread Starter: Patrick Walsh

    So I have a opportunity to purchase the above machine for a fair deal from my employer. I am aware of the phenolic guides being pop riveted I the the sliding table along with not availible for replacement. So my question is as follows to those in the know with regard to the phenolic ways....

    Last Post By: Brian Holcombe Yesterday, 11:16 PM Go to last post
    Greg Parrish

    Considering first festool

    Thread Starter: Greg Parrish

    Played with a kapex setup today that had their dust collector on it. Would love the kapex but Am considering my first festool in the form of a 5Ē sander with the dust collector but am not sure. The price of all the festool stuff is just so high. Itís hard to commit as a pure hobbiest. Can the...

    Last Post By: Dave Sabo Today, 12:15 AM Go to last post
    lowell holmes

    Chris Swarz surfaced at Highland Woodworking.

    Thread Starter: lowell holmes

    I wondered what happened and he left Lee Valley. I logged on to Highland woodworking and an article he wrote popped up. While on a trip that passed through Atlanta, I visited their store.

    Last Post By: Brian Nguyen Today, 12:20 AM Go to last post
    Kyle Foster

    Spruce

    Thread Starter: Kyle Foster

    So just a general question here, but is working with spruce always a pain or did I just happen to get dull chisels, or maybe I just dont know what I'm doing?

    Last Post By: Jim Koepke Today, 12:25 AM Go to last post
    Kris Cook

    Question on new (to us) home and shop space

    Thread Starter: Kris Cook

    I currently have my shop in a two-car garage. While I don't necessarily use both bays of the garage solely for wood working; for me the footprint of one bay is not adequate space to efficiently work. We are down-sizing and have just purchased a 100-year old house north of where we live now. The...

    Last Post By: Kris Cook Today, 1:14 AM Go to last post
    Malcolm Schweizer

    Share your stupid moments

    Thread Starter: Malcolm Schweizer

    I always say, "I love a good laugh, especially when it's on me." Here's my latest "duh moment." I spent a long time with a combination plane hand-rabbeting some pine boards for building a steam box. (Note: I do this by hand because I enjoy it and not for bravado.) All I had to do was drill the...

    Last Post By: Lee Schierer Yesterday, 8:48 PM Go to last post
  • Woodshop for Kids.....is not just woodworking

    Woodworkingfor Kids.....isnot just woodworking


    Kids need Hands On activities. Many like me, most engineers, woodworkers, electricians, mechanics and designers canít think without it. But in the last couple decades, with competition from computers, videos, video games, smartphones, school cutbacks, and emphasis on academics, hands on activities get short shift. Not that long ago Newsweek(July 19, 2010) had an article on the decline in creativity of young children because of too much internet, computers, video and not enough hands-on problem solving.

    For many kids there is no better hands on activity than woodworking. First and foremost woodworking teaches kids that is people who actually make things. And if people in general make things, then perhaps they can too. Children learn to use tools which leads to the empowering idea that if you want something which you canít find, buy, or afford, then you can build it. Woodworking teaches the various parts of a project are connected; you canít alter one without affecting the other. Kids learn things can be modified or fixed. Woodworking teaches the beginnings of design.

    Woodworking helps a child work on what they need to know: Kids in a hurry learn to slow down, those who want teacher approval for everything learn to be more independent, those who think they canít build anything learn they can, and those who think they know all about building learn they donít. Woodworking helps teach kids that adults, sometimes, do actually know something; it helps them listen. Amazingly, this all happens in just a few classes, almost like magic. Kids see the results of their decisions almost immediately (no tests involved) and without an adult having to say much, if anything.

    Not that long ago every high school, middle school and many elementary schools offered woodworking. Not any more. So its left to parents, grandparents and isolated outposts of Boys and Girls clubs, park departments, churches, daycares, and private schools to teach woodworking.

    Every year I start woodworking with a new group of kids I think,ďmaybe this year they wonít be interested; maybe this year there is just too much competition from electronic gadgets.Ē And every year, Iím amazed and surprised, again, that kids still like woodworking. Actually, they LOVE it. For kids, there is just some magic about taking a few tools, some wood and creating a project. And its the most interesting, fun, and meaningful woodworking Iíve done.
    Comments 2 Comments
    1. Pat Day's Avatar
      Pat Day -
      Love to recreate this locally. Do you have a curriculum you can post? Lesson plans, etc. would be nice to see.
      How do you handle liability and if you have any waivers the parents sign, that would be helpful, as well. Maybe I have too many lawyers for friends...but this stuff is getting more important by the day...
      Pat.
    1. Frederick Skelly's Avatar
      Frederick Skelly -
      Jack apparently hasnt logged on in several months Pat. You might have better luck sending an email. Look at his profile and there's a button.
      Fred