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    Patrick Walsh

    Vintage Martin T75 restoration

    Thread Starter: Patrick Walsh

    So I have a opportunity to purchase the above machine for a fair deal from my employer. I am aware of the phenolic guides being pop riveted I the the sliding table along with not availible for replacement. So my question is as follows to those in the know with regard to the phenolic ways....

    Last Post By: Bruce Page Yesterday, 11:05 PM Go to last post
    Jerry Olexa

    What has happened at Popular Woodworking magazine?

    Thread Starter: Jerry Olexa

    I have subscribed to PW for many years and this has been a favorite of mine...They have, in past, emphasized I thought the traditional, hand tool approach to woodworking and making fine furniture...I loved many of the feature articles by people such as Chris Schwartz, Glen Huey, etc. Over the...

    Last Post By: Keith Outten Yesterday, 4:43 PM Go to last post
    John K Jordan

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    Thread Starter: John K Jordan

    After almost two years of being left alone, some hungry creature in the area has been enjoying guinea fowl for supper. I've lost six in the last week or so, two just the night before last. About 3am I found the guineas scattered off their normal roosts with some high in the trees so I knew...

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    Alan Heffernan

    Which Slider Miter Saw to buy?

    Thread Starter: Alan Heffernan

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    Last Post By: Alan Heffernan Yesterday, 10:39 PM Go to last post
    Scott Winners

    About sharpening handsaws

    Thread Starter: Scott Winners

    There is some agitation in another area here to opening a sub forum specific to sharpening. I am far too new to have a valued opinion on the subject, though I am in favor. I can generally apply a rule of thirds when I take up a new thing. For joinery, sharpening saws turns out to be easy for...

    Last Post By: Scott Winners Yesterday, 11:00 PM Go to last post
    tim walker

    Boring Long Holes in 12x12 beams

    Thread Starter: tim walker

    Hi all, we are starting a new house build and have 4 rough cut cedar columns that are 12" x 12" x 6 ft, The intent is to install lights on them. The electric service will come from the ground. The light fixture will be located 4 ft from bottom of beam. Does anyone have suggestions of how to...

    Last Post By: tim walker Yesterday, 5:22 PM Go to last post
  • Woodshop for Kids.....is not just woodworking

    Woodworkingfor Kids.....isnot just woodworking


    Kids need Hands On activities. Many like me, most engineers, woodworkers, electricians, mechanics and designers canít think without it. But in the last couple decades, with competition from computers, videos, video games, smartphones, school cutbacks, and emphasis on academics, hands on activities get short shift. Not that long ago Newsweek(July 19, 2010) had an article on the decline in creativity of young children because of too much internet, computers, video and not enough hands-on problem solving.

    For many kids there is no better hands on activity than woodworking. First and foremost woodworking teaches kids that is people who actually make things. And if people in general make things, then perhaps they can too. Children learn to use tools which leads to the empowering idea that if you want something which you canít find, buy, or afford, then you can build it. Woodworking teaches the various parts of a project are connected; you canít alter one without affecting the other. Kids learn things can be modified or fixed. Woodworking teaches the beginnings of design.

    Woodworking helps a child work on what they need to know: Kids in a hurry learn to slow down, those who want teacher approval for everything learn to be more independent, those who think they canít build anything learn they can, and those who think they know all about building learn they donít. Woodworking helps teach kids that adults, sometimes, do actually know something; it helps them listen. Amazingly, this all happens in just a few classes, almost like magic. Kids see the results of their decisions almost immediately (no tests involved) and without an adult having to say much, if anything.

    Not that long ago every high school, middle school and many elementary schools offered woodworking. Not any more. So its left to parents, grandparents and isolated outposts of Boys and Girls clubs, park departments, churches, daycares, and private schools to teach woodworking.

    Every year I start woodworking with a new group of kids I think,ďmaybe this year they wonít be interested; maybe this year there is just too much competition from electronic gadgets.Ē And every year, Iím amazed and surprised, again, that kids still like woodworking. Actually, they LOVE it. For kids, there is just some magic about taking a few tools, some wood and creating a project. And its the most interesting, fun, and meaningful woodworking Iíve done.
    Comments 2 Comments
    1. Pat Day's Avatar
      Pat Day -
      Love to recreate this locally. Do you have a curriculum you can post? Lesson plans, etc. would be nice to see.
      How do you handle liability and if you have any waivers the parents sign, that would be helpful, as well. Maybe I have too many lawyers for friends...but this stuff is getting more important by the day...
      Pat.
    1. Frederick Skelly's Avatar
      Frederick Skelly -
      Jack apparently hasnt logged on in several months Pat. You might have better luck sending an email. Look at his profile and there's a button.
      Fred