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    Patrick Walsh

    Vintage Martin T75 restoration

    Thread Starter: Patrick Walsh

    So I have a opportunity to purchase the above machine for a fair deal from my employer. I am aware of the phenolic guides being pop riveted I the the sliding table along with not availible for replacement. So my question is as follows to those in the know with regard to the phenolic ways....

    Last Post By: Patrick Walsh Yesterday, 10:55 PM Go to last post
    Malcolm Schweizer

    I'm finally building my boat.

    Thread Starter: Malcolm Schweizer

    I lofted the station moulds for her about six years ago, but we moved to a place with less room to build a boat, so she went on hold. I have borrowed a place to build and am going to make all the bits and pieces in my shop, then assemble them in the borrowed space. This is going to be a slow...

    Last Post By: Malcolm Schweizer Yesterday, 10:43 AM Go to last post
    david charlesworth

    There's nothing wrong with A2

    Thread Starter: david charlesworth

    I frequently hear that A2 is difficult to sharpen with a wire edge which hangs on. My sharpening method is very simple. Get a small wire edge at 30 or 33 degrees . An Eclipse honing guide is used, with an 800 grit man made Waterstone. The angle is then raised by about 2-3 degrees Now 4...

    Last Post By: Frederick Skelly Yesterday, 9:26 PM Go to last post
    Steven Mikes

    Do you wear an apron while working?

    Thread Starter: Steven Mikes

    Wondering if its worth getting one. Seems like it could keep some dust off the clothes, but that usually brushes off quite readily. The pockets might be helpful just for holding small things like marking knife, pencil, small ruler, square, etc. There must be a reason why traditional woodworkers...

    Last Post By: steven c newman Yesterday, 7:29 PM Go to last post
    Dave Rosner

    Big table....big boards...

    Thread Starter: Dave Rosner

    Hi all - Iím building a 112Ē x 44Ē walnut dining table with 10/4 boards for the top. Iím having a heck of a time running the 7Ē-11Ē boards through my 8Ē jointer an 12Ē planner. Iím using the method of partially flattening 8Ē of the face and then running through my planner using a base that supports...

    Last Post By: Roger Feeley Yesterday, 4:37 PM Go to last post
    Roger M. Davis

    Drying bowl blanks

    Thread Starter: Roger M. Davis

    I have called every pet shop in town trying to find Silica Gel cat litter to us as a drying agent. It is hard to find. I think I will order it. Anyway I was just thinking why not use my vaccumn pump to pull out the water? Has anyone done this. I know when you stabilize pen blanks they tell you to...

    Last Post By: Alex Zeller Yesterday, 2:04 PM Go to last post
  • Woodshop for Kids.....is not just woodworking

    Woodworkingfor Kids.....isnot just woodworking


    Kids need Hands On activities. Many like me, most engineers, woodworkers, electricians, mechanics and designers canít think without it. But in the last couple decades, with competition from computers, videos, video games, smartphones, school cutbacks, and emphasis on academics, hands on activities get short shift. Not that long ago Newsweek(July 19, 2010) had an article on the decline in creativity of young children because of too much internet, computers, video and not enough hands-on problem solving.

    For many kids there is no better hands on activity than woodworking. First and foremost woodworking teaches kids that is people who actually make things. And if people in general make things, then perhaps they can too. Children learn to use tools which leads to the empowering idea that if you want something which you canít find, buy, or afford, then you can build it. Woodworking teaches the various parts of a project are connected; you canít alter one without affecting the other. Kids learn things can be modified or fixed. Woodworking teaches the beginnings of design.

    Woodworking helps a child work on what they need to know: Kids in a hurry learn to slow down, those who want teacher approval for everything learn to be more independent, those who think they canít build anything learn they can, and those who think they know all about building learn they donít. Woodworking helps teach kids that adults, sometimes, do actually know something; it helps them listen. Amazingly, this all happens in just a few classes, almost like magic. Kids see the results of their decisions almost immediately (no tests involved) and without an adult having to say much, if anything.

    Not that long ago every high school, middle school and many elementary schools offered woodworking. Not any more. So its left to parents, grandparents and isolated outposts of Boys and Girls clubs, park departments, churches, daycares, and private schools to teach woodworking.

    Every year I start woodworking with a new group of kids I think,ďmaybe this year they wonít be interested; maybe this year there is just too much competition from electronic gadgets.Ē And every year, Iím amazed and surprised, again, that kids still like woodworking. Actually, they LOVE it. For kids, there is just some magic about taking a few tools, some wood and creating a project. And its the most interesting, fun, and meaningful woodworking Iíve done.
    Comments 2 Comments
    1. Pat Day's Avatar
      Pat Day -
      Love to recreate this locally. Do you have a curriculum you can post? Lesson plans, etc. would be nice to see.
      How do you handle liability and if you have any waivers the parents sign, that would be helpful, as well. Maybe I have too many lawyers for friends...but this stuff is getting more important by the day...
      Pat.
    1. Frederick Skelly's Avatar
      Frederick Skelly -
      Jack apparently hasnt logged on in several months Pat. You might have better luck sending an email. Look at his profile and there's a button.
      Fred