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    Malcolm Schweizer

    I'm finally building my boat.

    Thread Starter: Malcolm Schweizer

    I lofted the station moulds for her about six years ago, but we moved to a place with less room to build a boat, so she went on hold. I have borrowed a place to build and am going to make all the bits and pieces in my shop, then assemble them in the borrowed space. This is going to be a slow...

    Last Post By: andy bessette Today, 4:17 PM Go to last post
    Roger Benton

    clifton vs lie nielsen????

    Thread Starter: Roger Benton

    Been wanting a #4-1/2 for a while and decided to save up the cash and buy new. I'd love to hear from any owners of Clifton planes, as that is LN's only competition for my $$$. I'd set it up and use it only for fine smoothing, to complement my #3. So let's hear some opinions from the Clifton folks!

    Last Post By: David Dalzell Today, 6:43 PM Go to last post
    Ole Anderson

    Craftsman at Lowe's and Ace

    Thread Starter: Ole Anderson

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    Last Post By: lowell holmes Yesterday, 9:28 PM Go to last post
    Larry Frank

    Dust Bin Sensor Completed

    Thread Starter: Larry Frank

    After reading all of the fine work by several members, I decided that I wanted to add the dust bin sensor to my Oneida Super Dust Gorilla. I ordered most of the parts on eBay. The sensor was $3.79, the delay relay board was $4.95 and the 12 V power supply was $9.99. I used some LED trailer...

    Last Post By: Larry Frank Today, 6:54 PM Go to last post
    ken hatch

    New Moravian Bench build Part 2

    Thread Starter: ken hatch

    The old thread was getting a little long in tooth. Friday night I screwed up one of the long stretcher tenons. After several rounds of "what if" and "yes but" I made the correct decision and went to the woodstore Saturday and picked up a nice hunk of 12/4 Poplar and started over. Here are...

    Last Post By: ken hatch Today, 6:55 PM Go to last post
    steven c newman

    Panel saw, for a $1

    Thread Starter: steven c newman

    has a few items of interest.... besides the price.. I cleaned the label screw, to get a better look at it Sheffield.No.59?...Patented..Trade Mark...Warranted...24" blade..more or less....has a "factory clipped toe"? Handle is VERY COMFY...

    Last Post By: steven c newman Today, 6:37 PM Go to last post
  • Woodshop for Kids.....is not just woodworking

    Woodworkingfor Kids.....isnot just woodworking


    Kids need Hands On activities. Many like me, most engineers, woodworkers, electricians, mechanics and designers canít think without it. But in the last couple decades, with competition from computers, videos, video games, smartphones, school cutbacks, and emphasis on academics, hands on activities get short shift. Not that long ago Newsweek(July 19, 2010) had an article on the decline in creativity of young children because of too much internet, computers, video and not enough hands-on problem solving.

    For many kids there is no better hands on activity than woodworking. First and foremost woodworking teaches kids that is people who actually make things. And if people in general make things, then perhaps they can too. Children learn to use tools which leads to the empowering idea that if you want something which you canít find, buy, or afford, then you can build it. Woodworking teaches the various parts of a project are connected; you canít alter one without affecting the other. Kids learn things can be modified or fixed. Woodworking teaches the beginnings of design.

    Woodworking helps a child work on what they need to know: Kids in a hurry learn to slow down, those who want teacher approval for everything learn to be more independent, those who think they canít build anything learn they can, and those who think they know all about building learn they donít. Woodworking helps teach kids that adults, sometimes, do actually know something; it helps them listen. Amazingly, this all happens in just a few classes, almost like magic. Kids see the results of their decisions almost immediately (no tests involved) and without an adult having to say much, if anything.

    Not that long ago every high school, middle school and many elementary schools offered woodworking. Not any more. So its left to parents, grandparents and isolated outposts of Boys and Girls clubs, park departments, churches, daycares, and private schools to teach woodworking.

    Every year I start woodworking with a new group of kids I think,ďmaybe this year they wonít be interested; maybe this year there is just too much competition from electronic gadgets.Ē And every year, Iím amazed and surprised, again, that kids still like woodworking. Actually, they LOVE it. For kids, there is just some magic about taking a few tools, some wood and creating a project. And its the most interesting, fun, and meaningful woodworking Iíve done.
    Comments 2 Comments
    1. Pat Day's Avatar
      Pat Day -
      Love to recreate this locally. Do you have a curriculum you can post? Lesson plans, etc. would be nice to see.
      How do you handle liability and if you have any waivers the parents sign, that would be helpful, as well. Maybe I have too many lawyers for friends...but this stuff is getting more important by the day...
      Pat.
    1. Frederick Skelly's Avatar
      Frederick Skelly -
      Jack apparently hasnt logged on in several months Pat. You might have better luck sending an email. Look at his profile and there's a button.
      Fred