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    Patrick Walsh

    Vintage Martin T75 restoration

    Thread Starter: Patrick Walsh

    So I have a opportunity to purchase the above machine for a fair deal from my employer. I am aware of the phenolic guides being pop riveted I the the sliding table along with not availible for replacement. So my question is as follows to those in the know with regard to the phenolic ways....

    Last Post By: Patrick Walsh Yesterday, 8:56 PM Go to last post
    Jon Snider

    New shop build, the MBS

    Thread Starter: Jon Snider

    I’ve received some offline encouragement to post some content of my new shop build. If you’ve read any of my other numerous questions (thx all for invaluable help), I’ve been at this since last April. Here is an effort to slowly catch up. The shop replaces the same spot where I built a veggie...

    Last Post By: Patrick Walsh Yesterday, 6:01 PM Go to last post
    Allan Speers

    Is a 1.5 HP cyclone enough for my gargage shop?

    Thread Starter: Allan Speers

    I know this has been asked many, many times, but I'm hoping for opinions on my specific setup: I have a typical hobbyist 2-car garage-shop. I only use 1 machine at a time. My biggest chip producer is a 12", 3 HP Powermatic 100 planer. I also have a 3 HP Unisaw and a 21", 5 HP bandsaw, but...

    Last Post By: Mark Daily Today, 12:51 PM Go to last post
    steven c newman

    Box Project, from scraps of Ash

    Thread Starter: steven c newman

    Well, will see how this goes....already have had a few days start. Had a tall stack of resawn Ash, before all those trips to the Hospitals happened, and then the Chester Drawers Project....decided to clear the "decks" and see what I could build with the stuff...Sorted through, found 4 pieces...

    Last Post By: steven c newman Yesterday, 9:35 PM Go to last post
    Axel de Pugey

    Are your old plane irons disposable?

    Thread Starter: Axel de Pugey

    Dear All, the other day I was sharpening irons for a Preston side rebate 2506 I received. As the angles were not correct to my liking I realised I was super careful to take off the minimum amount of metal possible. If these irons are finished/damaged I could potentially find replacements but it...

    Last Post By: Tom M King Yesterday, 7:32 PM Go to last post
    Andrew Pitonyak

    How do you cut dovetails

    Thread Starter: Andrew Pitonyak

    I always cut tails first, it is how I learned and I still do it that way. When I first started cutting dovetails, the advice I received was that I should mark the board, then tilt the board so that I would do all of my cuts vertical. I did this for a long time. Eventually, I became impatient. I...

    Last Post By: Jim Koepke Yesterday, 2:24 PM Go to last post
  • Woodshop for Kids.....is not just woodworking

    Woodworkingfor Kids.....isnot just woodworking


    Kids need Hands On activities. Many like me, most engineers, woodworkers, electricians, mechanics and designers canít think without it. But in the last couple decades, with competition from computers, videos, video games, smartphones, school cutbacks, and emphasis on academics, hands on activities get short shift. Not that long ago Newsweek(July 19, 2010) had an article on the decline in creativity of young children because of too much internet, computers, video and not enough hands-on problem solving.

    For many kids there is no better hands on activity than woodworking. First and foremost woodworking teaches kids that is people who actually make things. And if people in general make things, then perhaps they can too. Children learn to use tools which leads to the empowering idea that if you want something which you canít find, buy, or afford, then you can build it. Woodworking teaches the various parts of a project are connected; you canít alter one without affecting the other. Kids learn things can be modified or fixed. Woodworking teaches the beginnings of design.

    Woodworking helps a child work on what they need to know: Kids in a hurry learn to slow down, those who want teacher approval for everything learn to be more independent, those who think they canít build anything learn they can, and those who think they know all about building learn they donít. Woodworking helps teach kids that adults, sometimes, do actually know something; it helps them listen. Amazingly, this all happens in just a few classes, almost like magic. Kids see the results of their decisions almost immediately (no tests involved) and without an adult having to say much, if anything.

    Not that long ago every high school, middle school and many elementary schools offered woodworking. Not any more. So its left to parents, grandparents and isolated outposts of Boys and Girls clubs, park departments, churches, daycares, and private schools to teach woodworking.

    Every year I start woodworking with a new group of kids I think,ďmaybe this year they wonít be interested; maybe this year there is just too much competition from electronic gadgets.Ē And every year, Iím amazed and surprised, again, that kids still like woodworking. Actually, they LOVE it. For kids, there is just some magic about taking a few tools, some wood and creating a project. And its the most interesting, fun, and meaningful woodworking Iíve done.
    Comments 2 Comments
    1. Pat Day's Avatar
      Pat Day -
      Love to recreate this locally. Do you have a curriculum you can post? Lesson plans, etc. would be nice to see.
      How do you handle liability and if you have any waivers the parents sign, that would be helpful, as well. Maybe I have too many lawyers for friends...but this stuff is getting more important by the day...
      Pat.
    1. Frederick Skelly's Avatar
      Frederick Skelly -
      Jack apparently hasnt logged on in several months Pat. You might have better luck sending an email. Look at his profile and there's a button.
      Fred
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