• Recent Articles

  • Hottest Threads

    Dave Anderson NH

    Time for some levity

    Thread Starter: Dave Anderson NH

    With all of the negativity and political stuff going on with the Covid-19 virus it is time to look at the humorous side of things. Feel free to add more, but keep it clean or it will be deleted.

    Last Post By: Mel Fulks Yesterday, 12:15 PM Go to last post
    Jim Becker

    Shop Build...should be a fun journey...

    Thread Starter: Jim Becker

    I debated about starting this thread now or later, but decided on now because, well...I might forget something. :o As a little background, at our previous property, I was blessed with a reasonably sized, fully conditioned space for my shop in what was originally a three-and-a-half vehicle garage...

    Last Post By: Adam Herman Yesterday, 1:23 PM Go to last post
    Keith Outten

    Volkswagon Mechanics Talk To Me

    Thread Starter: Keith Outten

    I recently acquired this 1967 VW dune buggy knowing that it would be a bit of a project before I could get it on the road. It runs good just needs a tune up but I will need to replace some parts here and there to get it where it needs to be. Most of the parts are on order, new brake shoes, stuff...

    Last Post By: Keith Outten Yesterday, 12:33 PM Go to last post
    Forrest Gon

    new bandsaw wont' cut straight

    Thread Starter: Forrest Gon

    My first bandsaw, a new rikon 10-3061, set it up according to the manual and various youtube tutorials such as Alex Snodgrass's method (align the blade, tension the blade, thrust bearings and side guides) Now the issue is: the saw just won't cut straight, it will pull the wood off the fence...

    Last Post By: Rod Sheridan Yesterday, 10:04 PM Go to last post
    Brian Elfert

    I think my zero turn mower is cursed!

    Thread Starter: Brian Elfert

    I bought a used 2019 Grasshopper diesel zero turn mower with 189 hours on it last summer. I had all kinds of problems with it initially including a starter that didn't always turn over. I realized after I bought it that the mower had been buried pretty deep in mud or something as the dashboard...

    Last Post By: Brian Elfert Yesterday, 2:30 PM Go to last post
    Keegan Shields

    Teach us about rasps and floats

    Thread Starter: Keegan Shields

    There is a ton of info on the web about the more common woodworking hand tools (chisels, planes, saws) but what about rasps and floats? What’s the difference in application? How do these tools fit into the tool continuum from axe to sandpaper? What brands and models would you recommend to...

    Last Post By: Stephen Rosenthal Yesterday, 4:42 PM Go to last post
  • Turning Segmented Bowls by Ken Salisbury

    An article on segmented bowls by one of our original moderators, Ken Salisbury.

    This article describes the process used to make the following bowl.

    Make a sketch of the desired bowl profile as shown in the drawing above. Plan out the number of rings desired and the thickness of each and lay those in the drawing as "A" thru "H" as above. Now you can determine the length and width of the segments in a given ring. There are software programs available to help you determine the length and number of the segments for a specific diameter. One such program can be downloaded here. I use my own matrix which I developed some time ago to determine my segment configurations.

    The Process

    I cut segment pieces using a Delta CMS and vary the number of segments in a given ring. The number of segments in a given ring is a variable that needs consideration during the design of the bowl. (like they say in Alabama, "whatever cranks your tractor!"). Segments can also be cut using a table saw with a cut-off sled, adjustable for various angles required for the number of pieces in a given ring. It is absolutely essential to your success to be able to cut the segment pieces very accurately. This is necessary to eliminate gaps between segments and layers.

    Note: This project is intended to be, at a minimum for intermediate woodworkers.
    Novice woodworkers should start on a simple layered bowl:




    Apply Titebond II glue to two (2) segment pieces and press together, hand holding for just a few seconds and set aside. (A flat surface is recommended to accomplish segment glue-ups). The rings must be flat so as to not produce gaps when they are assembled to complete the bowl blank. I use a metal lab table when accomplishing this task. This pretty much eliminates the requirement to run the rings through a drum sander to ensure they are flat prior to assembly although there are times when I find it necessary to do so.

    Next, take pairs of segments and repeat the process until the ring is completed and a strap clamp can be applied until the glue is cured. This process continues until all the desired rings are assembled.





    Next comes the assembly of the rings to form a completed bowl blank, ready for turning. I prefer to assemble the rings in pairs using plenty of clamps to eliminate any gaps--again using Titebond II glue. Set these pairs of rings aside to dry. Although only an hour is required, I usually allow them to cure overnight.



    After assembling the bottom 4 rings I rough turned them on the lathe between centers.



    The next step is to assemble the groups of rings sequentially to make the completed blank--again, lots of clamps are a necessity.



    The top layer of the blank is a scrap piece of pine which was used to mount the completed blank to a 6" faceplate. The blank was installed on my lathe (Jet 1236) and the outside bowl profile was turned. It should be noted that during most of this turning process the lathe tail stock was used for stability (moved back to take pictures for clarity purposes).



    I sanded the outside with progressive grits of 100, 150, 220, 340, 600 and then burnished with shavings,

    It should be noted at this point—after turning the outside I didn't like the effect of the 4 segment ring of butternut for the bottom of the bowl. However, I did want the effect of the design to be seen on the inside. So with the blank still in the lathe I cut a disc of black figured walnut, glued and clamp to the bottom of the blank while it was still mounted in the lathe (using 3 Bessey clamps) bringing up the tailstock to center the piece to the blank and let sit overnight. (Sorry—I failed to take a picture of that)

    I turned a recess in the walnut bottom to accept a Nova Chuck and then reversed the blank on the lathe mounting with a Mini Nova chuck. I then turned off the scrap pine which was use to mount the blank to the faceplate and started the process of turning the inside of the piece.



    After completion of the inside turning process I sanded the inside using the same progressive grits as on the outside. I then applied a liberal coat of MinWax Antique Oil to the entire surface. After a 10 minute wait, I buffed the entire blank with a soft cloth and allowed the oil to cure overnight. I repeated this process 3 times. I then applied a coat of MinWax Finishing Wax, buffing with a soft cloth after 10 minutes. I waited about an hour and applied a second coat of wax and buffed. After removing the bowl from the lathe, I drilled a 1 1/2" recess in the bottom using a forstner bit to accept a custom signature wooden medallion.

    The Finished Product


    Types of Wood Used in Each Ring


    Posted In Memoriam of Ken Salisbury.
    Comments 7 Comments
    1. Peter Fabricius's Avatar
      Peter Fabricius -
      Hello;
      I would like to have a PM discussion with the person who posted this great article.
      Thanks
      Peter Fabricius
    1. Keith Outten's Avatar
      Keith Outten -
      Peter,

      Ken Salisbury was the very first Moderator here and a good friend. Ken passed away about three years ago however his talent and contributions here are still available for everyone to enjoy.
      .
    1. Peter Fabricius's Avatar
      Peter Fabricius -
      Hi Keith;
      I have been having a great discussion with David Watkerin by PM. I was looking for permission to print and use the article by Ken Salisbury in a presentation that I have been asked to do on Segmented bowls to our turning club.
      The Grey Bruce Woodturners Guild in Kincardine Ontario is a great place to share ideas and we often have guest turners. June 2011 is my date so I have lots of time. I am planning to build partial sections of a bowl so I can demonstrate the process without taking all the time needed to put the segments together, which is really impossible to do in a two hour session.
      I would like to use the article as a handout so the members will have a take away reference for use in their shops. Full credit would be given to Ken for his article.
      I am hoping you can authorize this.
      Thanks.
      Peter Fabricius
      Hanover, Ontario
    1. Keith Outten's Avatar
      Keith Outten -
      Peter,

      Information and file attachments that are shared here are owned by those who created the content. SawMill Creek receives the right to publish.

      Ken Salisbury has a daughter and a son living in the Huntsville Alabama area. They would probably have inherited any copyright that belonged to Ken.

      Ken was happy to share his woodworking expertise with everyone who had interest, I am sure he would be pleased that your group is interested in his article. As long as there is no financial gain and you provide the proper credit I would guess that you are safe to share his work with your turning group.
      .
    1. Peter Fabricius's Avatar
      Peter Fabricius -
      Thank you Keith;
      I was quite sure that it would be OK but I would not assume such.
      The conditions you mention will be upheld, we are not for profit and just like to share information and learn new techniques. The Segmented stuff is definately new to most and they will enjoy having Ken's article for reference.
      No financial gain for anyone and Ken's name will be prominently displayed as the author.
      Thanks
      Peter Fabricius
      Hanover, Ontario
    1. Cody Colston's Avatar
      Cody Colston -
      The Old Rebel may be gone but he is certainly not forgotten. That's a great tutorial and I'm happy to see it used in the manner Ken intended...to help other turners.
    1. Chris Helie's Avatar
      Chris Helie -
      All that I can say is that I am truly inspired!