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Belinda Williamson
09-12-2008, 3:28 PM
I left the office for lunch at 1:30. Unleaded fuel was $4.01. Just filled up at $4.39. :mad: Donalsonville, GA is now over $5.00. As you guys seeing the price increase?

Jim Becker
09-12-2008, 3:30 PM
I paid $3.51 yesterday and that was locally in SE PA. It's about 10-15 cents lower in New Jersey.

Mike Henderson
09-12-2008, 3:40 PM
News reports say that the southeast US is going to see big increases because of the shutdown of the refineries in the Texas area due to hurricane Ike. Other areas won't be as affected because they depend on other refineries.

Better fill up now. They say prices won't go down until October sometime.

Mike

Lee Schierer
09-12-2008, 3:48 PM
I filled up this morning because I needed gas soon and anticipated that the speculators would be bumping the price up because they are losing a couple of days of production along the Texas coast. Supposedly 1 in 4 gallons of US gas are produced in the area affected by the storm. Gas here was $3.59 this morning and at noon when I went out! The radio was reporting 20 cent per gallon jumps. In storm affected areas, I would suspect demand is high and the people that take advantage will be upping the price on what they have because the buyers don't have a choice if they want to get out ahead of the storm. Likewise don't look for any hotel bargains in Texas this weekend. Even Shatner will be paying full price if he goes to Texas.

Belinda Williamson
09-12-2008, 3:50 PM
South Carolina now has long lines at every pump, and a number of stations are out of fuel. Since we are on the state line apparently Savannah stations are anticipating a lot of people crossing the state line, or those traveling north filling up before they enter South Carolina. I paid $66.25 to fill my tank. Headed out now to fill a near empty tank on the F250 - can't wait to see that receipt!

BTW, price of fuel last night - $3.69.

Stan Terrell
09-12-2008, 3:50 PM
Price of unlead regular increased 93 cent a gallon between 9 AM and 3 pm here.

Stan

Kevin Arceneaux
09-12-2008, 4:36 PM
Actually production has little to due with the run up of prices. It is the possible hit to refining capacity in the Galveston Bay area.

http://maps.google.com/maps?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=s&hl=en&q=houston%20%2B%20chemical%20plants&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wl

http://maps.google.com/maps?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=s&hl=en&q=houston%20%2B%20chemical%20plants&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wl

Pat Germain
09-12-2008, 4:41 PM
I haven't noticed any price spikes in Colorado. However, I don't pay much attention to gas prices lately. I need gas no matter how much it costs. Since I started carpooling to work my Jetta gets a fillup only about every three weeks.

For those driving pickups around, I highly recommend buying a little commuter car if possible. (I understand many people need their trucks daily.) When I switched from commuting in a pickup to commuting in a Jetta, my whole life got better. :) I actually prefered making a car payment to paying outrageous amounts for fuel. Now that my Jetta is payed off, I'm even happier.

Buy a used Honda Civic, install a killer stereo and park the pickup for heavy duty operations. Watch and see how much happier you are. ;)

Belinda Williamson
09-12-2008, 5:13 PM
Actually production has little to due with the run up of prices. It is the possible hit to refining capacity in the Galveston Bay area.

Understood Kevin, but understanding doesn't make it any easier to stomach.



For those driving pickups around, I highly recommend buying a little commuter car if possible. (I understand many people need their trucks daily.) When I switched from commuting in a pickup to commuting in a Jetta, my whole life got better. :) I actually prefered making a car payment to paying outrageous amounts for fuel. Now that my Jetta is payed off, I'm even happier.

Buy a used Honda Civic, install a killer stereo and park the pickup for heavy duty operations. Watch and see how much happier you are. ;)

Pat, we drive a 1997 Maxima to and from work every day, and for any work related activities that do not require the truck. The car is paid for, gets pretty good mileage (not like the Jetta), has enough dings that I don't pitch a hissy when someone bangs into it with a shopping cart, and it does't matter if we're pretty dirty on the ride home. :)

We do need the truck for deliveries to our main customer who, fortunately, is only five miles away.

People were stealing gas around here when it went above $3, I'm guessing if it hits $5 they'll cut your throat for it! :eek:

Pat Germain
09-12-2008, 5:22 PM
Pat, we drive a 1997 Maxima to and from work every day ...

It's amazing how much freedom one can get from a small car that's already dinged up! I really like nice cars, but those are best for weekend driving in my case.

Interestingly, over the past few months I've heard and read many times the primary reason gas prices went down was lower demand. Americans actually drove a lot less this summer. I love cars, but I think driving less is a good thing.

Belinda Williamson
09-12-2008, 5:33 PM
It's amazing how much freedom one can get from a small car that's already dinged up!

So true! If we head downtown for a night out we always drive the Maxima. Since Savannah has "to go" cups, you see a lot more outdoor activities where people are intoxicated, and a lot more intoxicated people just generally roaming the streets than you see in other towns. I've actually walked out of a restaurant to see people sitting on the hood of my car. I'd be a little distressed if that happened to my other car.

Back to the gas issue. I just spoke with my parents who, thankfully, filled up yesterday. They live on the farm about 13 miles out of town. I worry about their neighbors and others who live on a fixed income. What do you do when you can't afford to go to work?

Pat Germain
09-12-2008, 5:40 PM
...I've actually walked out of a restaurant to see people sitting on the hood of my car.

OK, this is a serious derail, but I think it's a pretty funny story...

My dad and brother were walking to the car parked downtown one winter evening. As they got close to the car, they could a man standing next to it. At first, my dad wondered if the guy was trying to steal something inside. Then it became clear the guy was urinating on the door. :eek:

"What's going on!" my dad yelled.

"Oh, the lock on my car is frozen and I'm trying to thaw it out," they guy answered matter of factly.

"Your key doesn't work because that's my car!" Dad informed the guy.

At this point the guy zipped up, said he was sorry and tried to clean off the "mess" with some snow. My brother said he was in no condition to be driving.

Whatcha gonna do? :rolleyes:

glenn bradley
09-12-2008, 5:56 PM
This is worse than the Baltic birch price increase con-job, or coffee, or olive oil. I try to gain some satisfaction in the fact that I drive about half of what I used to just a few months ago. Its amazing how many unnecessary trips I used to take without thinking about it. Of course this is California and you all know we normally would drive from the garage to the mailbox right in front of our own house to get the gasoline credit card bills ;-)

P.s. I would donate an extra dollar on my taxes to fund an outfit to financially destroy any company and all involved with it that hike prices during such a hardship of nature.

Rich Engelhardt
09-12-2008, 5:59 PM
Hello,
The price of crude dipped below $100 a barrel.
If figures they'd raise the price of gas.
Oil goes up - gas goes up.
Oil goes down - gas goes up.

Once - just once - I'd like to hear one of those #%*&$'s from an oil company just come out and say the price is going up - "because we can".

I've been hearing all these excuses for close to 38 years.
It's gotten real old.

Really - how can the price of crude oil drop 40% and the price of gas go up?

Belinda Williamson
09-12-2008, 6:11 PM
Really - how can the price of crude oil drop 40% and the price of gas go up?

As Kevin said, this is all related to Ike and Galveston. South Carolina stations get their fuel from that area, as I understant it. So, when the refineries shut down for a couple of days fear developed that there would be a shortage of gas. Some stores are asking their customers to only buy ten gallons, etc. Now remember, these stores are selling gas they have paid already for, so it isn't costing them anymore for what is being pumped. I understand that they may have to pay a higher price to refill their tanks, but they don't know that for sure. I don't proclaim to understand the economics of it all, but I do understand someone taking advantage of bad situation. Those of us in this area, while feeling badly for those in Ike's path, were so happy to be out of the line of fire. We just never realized we'd feel the heat anyway!

Interesting info that I didn't know before about states who are under a state of emergency.

http://www.wwaytv3.com/aaa_carolinas_don039t_panic_over_gas_prices/09/2008

Joe Pelonio
09-12-2008, 6:36 PM
That has to be gouging, in the storm area. Ours hasn't been lower in a long time. Yesterday while on a job near Olympia it was $3.69, today my local station is $3.82, and we have state sales tax 8.9% and an extra 9 cents gas tax included in that, making our prices among the highest usually.

Colin Giersberg
09-12-2008, 6:53 PM
Alabama's Governor Bob Riley has enacted anti-price gouging measures. I don't know what fines, if any apply for violaters.
While at work today (AL. Dept. of Transportation), a couple of contractor's personnel received phone calls from their wives, saying that prices were going up. One said that gas near his house was $5.38 a gallon on regular gas. The price yesterday was around $3.50, so that is a substantial jump. Fortunately, diesel seems to be staying about the same. One station had it for $3.94 and now, it is $3.99 a gallon.

Jason Roehl
09-12-2008, 6:53 PM
If a sultan breaks wind, our gas prices go up. My last fill-up in my pickup was the cheapest in quite a while at $3.59 or $3.65/gal (can't recall which it was). Today on the way home from work, I was seeing $3.89/gal prices around.

Matt Ocel
09-12-2008, 7:00 PM
$339.9 on the way to work this morning.

$369.9 at lunch.

I don't even want to drive by this evening.

Gary Max
09-12-2008, 7:08 PM
The price of gas has went up here in Kentucky 40 cents per gallon today-----Just think of the folks who made a killing off this today. I wonder if they even care about the lives they affect in by making all this $$$$$$$$ or is that just business????

Belinda Williamson
09-12-2008, 7:52 PM
Fortunately, diesel seems to be staying about the same. One station had it for $3.94 and now, it is $3.99 a gallon.

Diesel has stayed about the same here. I suspect that will change pretty soon. If it stays down I'll be really sorry we sold our old diesel Suburban "campin' wagon" about three months ago.

Brian Elfert
09-12-2008, 8:04 PM
Most gas prices around where I live haven't gone up yet, but the local gas price website is showing a lot of stations going up 15 to 20 cents a gallon.

Now, I am in Minnesota and we have two refineries supplied by an oil pipeline out of Canada.

I'm leaving on vacation in about ten days and of course prices go up. I'm going to use around 500 gallons of diesel to make the trip.

skip coyne
09-12-2008, 8:12 PM
3.65 this morning , 3.85 this evening , wifes friend who owns a convince store told her there would be a HUGE jump tomorrow

I just filled both vehicles , I figure its not going down , wont go bad and we will use it :rolleyes:

Pat Germain
09-12-2008, 8:15 PM
No doubt about it. High gas prices are a pain. But consider a few facts:

- Oil is an international commodity. The price for "light sweet" crude is the same everywhere in the world

- The price of oil is based on the US dollar. When the value of the dollar is down, the price of oil goes up and vice versa

- Oil must be refined to get fuel and doing so is expensive. Out of a 55 gallon "barrel" of oil, only a certain percentage of it can be refined into gasoline or diesel

- The price of gasoline is based on supply and demand. The supplies of crude internationally and the supplies of refined gasoline in a local area affect the price. If gasoline supplies in one area are cut off, gasoline must be pumped or trucked in from another area which adds to the cost

- Fueling stations make little or no profit i]on the gas they sell. That's why they have stores to sell other things which do bring a profit

- Passing anti-gouging laws are feel good measures which will have no affect. "Gouging" by oil companies has literally been investigated by Congress multiple times and it always comes to nothing. You might as well pass anti-gouging laws for gold or shares of Disney stock

- Communities and states who add extra taxes and pass laws demanding special fuel blends can expect higher prices. Both of these reasons are primary factors for the higher cost of gasoline in California

- When gas prices go up, it doesn't seem right to charge consumers more for the fuel in the ground tanks. After all, the wholesalers didn't pay that much for it the week before. Yet, just the same, when the price goes down, the gas in the ground tanks cost more the week before and is sold for less

- So-called "big oil" companies like Chevron, Exxon-Mobil and BP are large companies, but are really just chumps in the international oil market. OPEC are the big boys and they affect oil prices, not big oil. OPEC members aren't just Arab nations. Venezuela is an OPEC member. When OPEC reduces output and prices go up, big oil makes more money. When OPEC increases output and prices go down, big oil makes less money. Big oil has no influence on OPEC. OPEC nations do what they want to include cheating by producing more than they agree on

- If you can get to Mexico and can find quality gasoline, buy it. Mexican gasoline is subsidised by the government. You can benefit from this subsidy simply by filling your tank across the border

Kevin Arceneaux
09-12-2008, 8:27 PM
No doubt about it. High gas prices are a pain. But consider a few facts:

- Oil is an international commodity. The price for "light sweet" crude is the same everywhere in the world

Actually this is not correct. While prices remain close, at the different "hubs" the price will vary and the price is FOB.

- The price of oil is based on the US dollar. When the value of the dollar is down, the price of oil goes up and vice versa

- Oil must be refined to get fuel and doing so is expensive. Out of a 55 gallon "barrel" of oil, only a certain percentage of it can be refined into gasoline or diesel

- The price of gasoline is based on supply and demand. The supplies of crude internationally and the supplies of refined gasoline in a local area affect the price. If gasoline supplies in one area are cut off, gasoline must be pumped or trucked in from another area which adds to the cost

- Fueling stations make little or no profit i]on the gas they sell. That's why they have stores to sell other things which do bring a profit

- Passing anti-gouging laws are feel good measures which will have no affect. "Gouging" by oil companies has literally been investigated by Congress multiple times and it always comes to nothing. You might as well pass anti-gouging laws for gold or shares of Disney stock

- Communities and states who add extra taxes and pass laws demanding special fuel blends can expect higher prices. Both of these reasons are primary factors for the higher cost of gasoline in California

- When gas prices go up, it doesn't seem right to charge consumers more for the fuel in the ground tanks. After all, the wholesalers didn't pay that much for it the week before. Yet, just the same, when the price goes down, the gas in the ground tanks cost more the week before and is sold for less

- So-called "big oil" companies like Chevron, Exxon-Mobil and BP are large companies, but really just chumps in the international oil market. OPEC are the big boys and they have much more to do with oil prices than any of the "big oil" companies. OPEC members aren't just Arab nations. Venezuela is an OPEC member

- If you can get to Mexico and can find quality gasoline, buy it. Mexican gasoline is subsidised by the government. You can benefit from this subsidy simply by filling your tank across the border

A lot of information
http://www.gravmag.com/oil.html

Eric Larsen
09-12-2008, 8:29 PM
We've got a 14-year old sedan that still gets 28mpg, so we're going to drive it until the wheels fall off, then buy a plug-in hybrid. A 5kw solar system has been on order for a few months now. Can't wait 'til it is installed.

Then I'm going to take a picture of my posterior and mail it to the CEOs of WrExxon-Mobil, BP, Petrobras, etc.

Same thing every couple months:

"There may be a hailstorm in Galveston next week, so gas prices are going up today."

"Sure, crude has gone down, but the gas in the tanks was produced at the old rates, so we have to sell that first before we can lower prices."

It's been the same-'ol as long as I've been alive. I wish they'd just admit they're reaming us because they can. I prefer the honest approach.

Pat Germain
09-12-2008, 8:47 PM
A lot of information
http://www.gravmag.com/oil.html

Interesting. Although, most of the information on the page is dated by several years. And I somewhat disagree with the linked page claiming OPEC has no control over prices.

Belinda Williamson
09-12-2008, 8:54 PM
I prefer the honest approach.

Yeah, Eric, what you said!

Pat Germain
09-12-2008, 9:11 PM
I can certainly understand the anger people have over gas prices. But I really don't think it's fair to paint oil companies as evil cons shouting "Moo-hoo-ha!" over our pain and suffering.

I have no affilliation with any oil company. I know they spend tens of billions of dollars every year in operating costs. They employ tens of thousands of Americans who make very good salaries. They make sure gasoline and diesel are available in even the most remote parts of the country. Although gas prices are high, when was the last time you couldn't find any to buy?

Are lumber mills being dishonest with us when they raise the price of teak, oak or bubinga? I don't like paying $8.00 a board foot for hard maple, but I don't think the lumber mills are cheating me or being dishonest with me. If America consumed as much hardwood as we do gasoline, lumber mills would be making just a much money as oil companies. Would that make them evil?

I think the fact we're so dependent on gasoline makes us feel cheated. Should oil companies sell gasoline for less than the market value?

Belinda Williamson
09-12-2008, 9:28 PM
If America consumed as much hardwood as we do gasoline, lumber mills would be making just a much money as oil companies. Would that make them evil?

With all due respect Pat, if hardwood was essential to survival, as gasoline is to some people, then making that much money would be wrong. I won't call the oil companies evil, but raising the price in times of disaster is wrong. The profits already made by "big oil companies" should allow them to ride out a small bump in the road. Having said that, I am aware that a loss of a refinery is not a small bump; howevef, a few days of down time would seem to be small.

Pat Germain
09-12-2008, 9:49 PM
You make a very good point, Belinda. I'm wondering if oil companies indeed raise prices during natural disasters simply because they can, or if other factors are involved.

I'm going to research this.

Pete Clifford
09-12-2008, 11:27 PM
Here in Canada, some cities have had significant price hikes based on the potential threat from Hurricane Ike. I find it hard to believe that our gasoline prices have anything to do with the Gulf Coast refineries, since we have Alberta and her refineries, as well as Ontario refineries. Current prices in my town are around $1.44 per litre, which works out to the equivalent of around $5.48 per gallon. We haven't seen $3.50 per gallon in a long time.

Clifford Mescher
09-12-2008, 11:47 PM
"The answer to the first question is that over the past 25 years, oil companies directly paid or remitted more than $2.2 trillion in taxes, after adjusting for inflation, to federal and state governments—including excise taxes, royalty payments and state and federal corporate income taxes. That amounts to more than three times what they earned in profits during the same period, according to the latest numbers from the Bureau of Economic Analysis and U.S. Department of Energy. "
I would not kill the Golden Goose. Clifford

Belinda Williamson
09-13-2008, 7:51 AM
I would not kill the Golden Goose. Clifford

Okay, so we can't kill him. Can we at least put him on a diet?

Diesel went up 0.30 overnight.

Gary Garmar
09-13-2008, 8:45 AM
Me thinks you have your anger directed to the wrong perp. The majors are mostly (almost exclusively) on the procurement side of the equation, not on the retail end of things. The majors don't set the price of oil per barrel. In a way you do. The distributors and retailers are the ones who set the price of a gallon of gasoline. Just because a retailer carries the name of a major, doesn't mean that they are owned by that major. Just last month Conoco/Phillips announced that they were selling 600 of their stations, more to follow. Its such a complex situation, not a single entity to bare the blame.

todd johnson
09-13-2008, 8:55 AM
Got a call form a guy at work yesterday morning right before I left. His daughter manages a shoppette on FT Campbell and told him that their gas was going to run out and that he should fill up. He called me to pass on the word. Yesterday morning at about 7:00 am, the local gas station was already out of the 87 octane. I filled up on 89 octane at about 3.53 a gallon. Don't know what the price is now. Hopefully I can hold out until the refineries get back online and the supply is reestablished.

David Fairfield
09-13-2008, 9:01 AM
Well, look on the bright side, high gas prices are good for R & D and economy. I get about 40 mpg in my Civic Hybrid. Toyota has a 100mpg hybrid in the testing phase. BMW is testing a "water powered" car that converts water to hydrogen using a solar panel on the roof.

And check out the Tessla electric sports car. http://www.teslamotors.com/ I want one! :cool:

Dave

Belinda Williamson
09-13-2008, 9:06 AM
Me thinks you have your anger directed to the wrong perp.

Gary, this didn't start out really with anger directed at one entity (or entities), just frustration with the situation. The discussion naturally took a turn toward the "big guys". I wasn't happy about the price increase, but expected it. The "insanity" came in with the response of people in the area to the increase, the long lines at the pumps, the ensuing arguments, etc., and even a panic on the part of some when the rumor about a pipeline rupture really took off.

It still seems wrong to me for whomever is in control to incresae prices during a disaster. I don't know what happened with prices in Texas when the evacuations started, but I can vouch for what happens here in such a case. Once there is even discussion of mandatory evacuations fuel prices start to rise. Many people don't have family or friends and are forced to stay in a hotel. That is a big expense for some. Then factor in the increase in fuel prices and evacuating becomes a hardship they just can't afford. I think increases would be a little easier to bear if prices actually dropped in such situations, and rose afterwards.

Belinda Williamson
09-13-2008, 9:09 AM
Got a call form a guy at work yesterday morning right before I left. His daughter manages a shoppette on FT Campbell and told him that their gas was going to run out and that he should fill up. He called me to pass on the word. Yesterday morning at about 7:00 am, the local gas station was already out of the 87 octane. I filled up on 89 octane at about 3.53 a gallon. Don't know what the price is now. Hopefully I can hold out until the refineries get back online and the supply is reestablished.

I met a guy from Tennessee when I was filling up yesterday. He was about to get on the road for home when his wife called to tell him he better fuel up and get a spare can of gas because of the situation in the Carolinas. I'm sorry to hear that you guys are having this issue as well. I hope he got home okay.

Jason Roehl
09-13-2008, 5:57 PM
Well, now we're up to $4.15...

Derek Tuchscherer
09-13-2008, 6:26 PM
Hmmmmm...here in Saskatchewan we are supposedly in an "oil boom" and there is a major refinery right in my city, and yet because a hurricane "might" do damage to rigs andrefineries thousand of miles from me, our prices got hiked yesterday...to the point that I am now paying the equivalent of $5.51/US Gallon ($1.459/Litre)! I'll take all of your 3.XX and even 4.xx per gallon prices right now in a heartbeat!

Neal Clayton
09-13-2008, 10:59 PM
Hello,
The price of crude dipped below $100 a barrel.
If figures they'd raise the price of gas.
Oil goes up - gas goes up.
Oil goes down - gas goes up.

Once - just once - I'd like to hear one of those #%*&$'s from an oil company just come out and say the price is going up - "because we can".

I've been hearing all these excuses for close to 38 years.
It's gotten real old.

Really - how can the price of crude oil drop 40% and the price of gas go up?

if only they would've broken up the oil companies from their refining businesses rather than ATT back in the 80s.

would've done us a much bigger favor.

Casey Gooding
09-14-2008, 9:13 AM
$5.45 for Regular unleaded in Tallahassee last night.
What I'm sure people don't realize is that making the run on the gas stations and sucking it all up is what really caused the shortages and price hikes....not the hurricane.

Belinda Williamson
09-14-2008, 9:23 AM
$5.45 for Regular unleaded in Tallahassee last night.
What I'm sure people don't realize is that making the run on the gas stations and sucking it all up is what really caused the shortages and price hikes....not the hurricane.

That's what we're hearing Casey. We hit $4.60 last night and I haven't been out yet this morning. According to the owner of a significant number of convenience stores in our area he just refilled his tanks and his cost, including all fees and taxes, was $5.07 per gallon. That's before he takes the hit for credit card fees. Refineries are supposed to be down for eight days or so, probably longer, and we're already seeing stations out of fuel.

http://savannahnow.com/node/573135

SCOTT ANDREWS
09-14-2008, 10:47 AM
Plenty of fuel here in So. Cal.Where I live prices have dropped 9 cents per gallon in the last 2 days to 3.61 per gallon.

David G Baker
09-14-2008, 10:48 AM
I lucked out yesterday, one of the local gas stations was selling regular at $3.92 while all the others were selling it in the range of $4.14-$4.19. Rumors were flying about in nearby cities charging $7.00 per gallon. Folks sure get crazy when things they can't control are taking place.

Clifford Mescher
09-14-2008, 11:08 AM
I lucked out yesterday, one of the local gas stations was selling regular at $3.92 while all the others were selling it in the range of $4.14-$4.19. Rumors were flying about in nearby cities charging $7.00 per gallon. Folks sure get crazy when things they can't control are taking place.
It will take at least a week to get the refineries up and running to full capacity again. We really need more refineries. Clifford

Belinda Williamson
09-14-2008, 5:17 PM
Well, the latest news is that some refineries and pipelines were damaged in the storm. I wonder where things will go from here. No stations have 87 octane here, and very few have 89.

Gary Garmar
09-14-2008, 5:24 PM
Belinda, if you really follow the price increases, you will see a seasonal increase in the spring and fall. That increase is due to mandated fuel formulation schemes. Now the thing that really irritates me is the increases we always see just prior to hollidays. Again, retailers !!!!

Mike Henderson
09-14-2008, 6:50 PM
Well, the latest news is that some refineries and pipelines were damaged in the storm. I wonder where things will go from here. No stations have 87 octane here, and very few have 89.
There's really no 89 octane fuel. What the pump does is mix the 87 and 91 octane to give you 89. So the truck only delivers two grades of fuel, not three.

At least that's the way it's done around here.

Mike

[So if they claim to have 89 and no 87, I'd ask some questions.]

Rob Bourgeois
09-14-2008, 6:55 PM
3.60 to 3.70 and we got hit by the hurricanes. Difference here is everyone wasnt running to buy it all up. Most had filled everything they had for the storms and most had it left over.

Belinda Williamson
09-15-2008, 7:34 AM
There's really no 89 octane fuel. What the pump does is mix the 87 and 91 octane to give you 89. So the truck only delivers two grades of fuel, not three.

At least that's the way it's done around here.

Mike

[So if they claim to have 89 and no 87, I'd ask some questions.]

I learn something new every day. Maybe then mix the 87 and 91 and store it in an "89" tank. I guess I could ask the question, but I'm guessing that the average clerk behind the counter around here wouldn't know the answer. Thanks for the info!

Eric Larsen
09-15-2008, 9:42 AM
I learn something new every day. Maybe then mix the 87 and 91 and store it in an "89" tank. I guess I could ask the question, but I'm guessing that the average clerk behind the counter around here wouldn't know the answer. Thanks for the info!

There are only two underground tanks. The gas is mixed at the pump. They're probably forcing you to buy 89 so that they use up their premium at the same rate as their regular. Otherwise, all the 87 would get sold first, then all that would be left is the 91.

As usual, they should just be honest about it.

Belinda Williamson
09-15-2008, 9:44 AM
There are only two underground tanks. The gas is mixed at the pump. They're probably forcing you to buy 89 so that they use up their premium at the same rate as their regular. Otherwise, all the 87 would get sold first, then all that would be left is the 91.

As usual, they should just be honest about it.

Well, at least I'm getting educated on the subject. Thanks guys for helping me to understand the situation.

Joe Cunningham
09-15-2008, 10:47 AM
There are only two underground tanks. The gas is mixed at the pump. They're probably forcing you to buy 89 so that they use up their premium at the same rate as their regular. Otherwise, all the 87 would get sold first, then all that would be left is the 91.

As usual, they should just be honest about it.

In my younger days I worked at a gas station and would open on weekends--we used to have to 'stick' three tanks. Mid-grade was held in a separate tank. Of course we didn't have the fancy pumps that take credit cards like they do today (this was in the late 80s-early 90s). And we didn't carry diesel, just gasoline. 93, 89, 87 octane. Based on what others are saying, I suspect the 89 tank might have been a holdover from 'regular' gas (the leaded variety). I'll have to check out my old service station and see how many fill up covers they have.

*Stick: as in put a measuring stick into the tank to get a reading on how much gas is in said tank. The start and end of each day we did this as a quality check on the metered readings.

Tim Thomas
09-15-2008, 11:33 AM
Stranger to me than the price increase is the disparity in price between stations that are almost within sight of one another. I was visiting family in Augusta, GA this weekend and saw prices at three different stations within one mile of my sister's house that just made no sense. One station was at $3.99, one was at $4.39 and the last one was at a staggering $5.29. And there were people buying gas AT ALL THREE STATIONS! It was a real headscratcher for me. I bought the $3.99 gas and got the heck out of town. Of course, when I got home to Birmingham I saw that gas close to my house is currently selling for $4.19. Wonderful. :D (For the record, when I got to Augusta last Wednesday night, the price for gas was about $3.49.)

Michael Donahue
09-15-2008, 7:03 PM
I know that prices were high in the south because of the hurricane, but on a bigger picture I don't get it. Oil hit a high of about $150/barrel and gas was just over $4/gallon. Now demand is down overall supposedly because of the high prices and a barrel of crude is going for just under $100. So why am I still paying $3.50 at the pump??


:confused::confused::confused::confused::confused: :confused::confused:

Joe Pelonio
09-16-2008, 2:35 PM
I know that prices were high in the south because of the hurricane, but on a bigger picture I don't get it. Oil hit a high of about $150/barrel and gas was just over $4/gallon. Now demand is down overall supposedly because of the high prices and a barrel of crude is going for just under $100. So why am I still paying $3.50 at the pump??


:confused::confused::confused::confused::confused: :confused::confused:
I'd be thrilled to find a station as low as $3.50! I just filled up at Safeway, and with my "awards" discount paid $3.37, but that's only because we've bought a lot of groceries since the last time. Their regular price for generic gas today was $3.77.

Belinda Williamson
09-17-2008, 8:07 AM
Price for 87 down this morning to $4.08, but you can't buy 87.