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Dan Barr
09-22-2007, 10:46 PM
Anoyone got any soft copy workbench plans they could send me? Something ROCK SOLID with two vises, benchdog holes and a few drawers.

Thanks,

Dan

Tom Henry
09-22-2007, 10:57 PM
This is all you need...

http://pages.friendlycity.net/~krucker/Bench/index.htm

Ken Garlock
09-23-2007, 12:35 PM
Hi Dan.

Here is a PLAN (http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_journal/woodworking/1302961.html) that was in the November 2004 Popular Mechanics. It think I would fill the 'rock solid' requirement, but does not have drawers. The design is simple and IMO could be easily modified.

Dan Barr
09-28-2007, 11:29 PM
Thanks, Nice plans too.

Dan:)

glenn bradley
09-29-2007, 12:18 AM
ShopNotes 15 / 89 and the latest Woodsmith. I don't have soft copies; copyright laws and all that. They may be worth a look just for comparison or for integrating some of the features into whatever you build.

tim rowledge
09-29-2007, 1:46 AM
Here's a link to my bench in SketchUp - a single vise in my case but adding a second would not be much of an issue.

http://tinyurl.com/32uy7m

Dan Barr
09-29-2007, 4:47 AM
thanks,

Dan

David Holmes
09-29-2007, 11:22 AM
Maybe I'm breaching protocol since this is my first post here, but I've been reading the new Woodsmith plans on the workbench and when I priced it out for lumber only, I get about $600.00. Is this right? Seems you could by a top quality one for less.

David Holmes

Jim Becker
09-29-2007, 1:13 PM
Maybe I'm breaching protocol since this is my first post here, but I've been reading the new Woodsmith plans on the workbench and when I priced it out for lumber only, I get about $600.00. Is this right? Seems you could by a top quality one for less.



"Top quality" benches often go for in excess of $1000-1500 if you were to buy them at retail.

Are you pricing out rough lumber for the plan you are considering?

David Holmes
10-03-2007, 2:07 PM
I just took the board feet and looked at some prices online for hard maple per board foot at the required widths and depths.

Dan Barr
10-10-2007, 1:21 PM
Yup, Ive been estimating prices on mine too. I got "The Workbench Book" and have gotten a lot of nice ideas to incorporate. I figure after i buy all the hardware and rough lumber, i'll have at least $1000.00 in the materials alone.

Does anyone have any experience with or know where to get those adjustable aluminum stops. They are inset flush with the workbench surface and can raise up to hold work in place like a benchdog. Does anyone even know what i'm talking about? They are in The Workbench Book on one of the workbenches.

Also, anyone know where i can get hold of an Emmert Turtleback model 83 vise? lol I'll probably have to sell off one of my arms to get one of those.


thanks,

Dan

Derek Tuchscherer
10-10-2007, 5:00 PM
Is this what you are looking for?

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=31148&cat=1,41637

Regards
Derek

Dan Barr
10-10-2007, 8:20 PM
thanks.

decent price too.

anyone got these on their table? any reviews from SMC members?

i'd be interested in hearing how the hold up and if there are any disadvantages compared to regular benchdogs.

Dan

John Maus
12-16-2007, 7:40 PM
Dan,

I built a bench using Keith Ruckers pages as Tom Henry linked for you. Rucker lays it out very clearly and his plan makes a great bench. Good Luck.

John

Marcus Ward
12-17-2007, 8:43 PM
You guys gotta get your wood in different places. I pay 2$/bd ft for hard maple. What kind of prices are you looking at? My bench used about 70 bd ft (including waste) for the top.

Chris Friesen
12-18-2007, 1:49 AM
You guys gotta get your wood in different places. I pay 2$/bd ft for hard maple. What kind of prices are you looking at? My bench used about 70 bd ft (including waste) for the top.

I wish. Around here hard maple is at least 3X that price, and more for the thicker stuff.

jonathan snyder
12-18-2007, 2:29 AM
Pick up the new Chris Schwarz workbench book. It is excellent. It will make you think about workbenches in a whole new way. It is nothing like the Landis book. Chris discusses workbench use and has plane for two benches.

Jonathan

Chris Padilla
12-18-2007, 11:44 AM
thanks.

decent price too.

anyone got these on their table? any reviews from SMC members?

i'd be interested in hearing how the hold up and if there are any disadvantages compared to regular benchdogs.

Dan

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=31127&cat=1,41637,41645

I like these, pricier, but quite nice and fully removable...more traditional.

Marcus Ward
12-18-2007, 5:16 PM
I made square holes and traditional dogs out of oak. Takes a few minutes and when they get worn out I have plenty of scraps to make more. Springs made from old bandsaw blades to hold them at the proper height and keep them from dropping during adjustments.

Ruston Hughes
12-28-2007, 2:26 PM
I second Jonathan's recommendation on the Schwartz book. It has really helped me think through what I want in a second workbench, and how to achieve that in the simplest and most cost effective manner.

Ben Brownbrwn
01-11-2008, 12:46 PM
There is plan in a 2006 fine woodworking mag. It is entirely made of plywood. Great plan. It is by Cecil Braeden. Cost approx $300. Really worth it considering plywood would not expand or contract like wood and remain stable throughout. I also have a soft copy, but I don't know if I can post it. If the admin allows maybe I can share it.

Ben Brownbrwn
01-11-2008, 12:58 PM
There is plan in a 2006 fine woodworking mag. It is entirely made of plywood. Great plan. It is by Cecil Braeden. Cost approx $300. Really worth it considering plywood would not expand or contract like wood and remain stable throughout. I also have a soft copy, but I don't know if I can post it. If the admin allows maybe I can share it.

Peter M. Spirito
02-03-2008, 3:40 PM
If you are pricing/purchasing your material from the local lumber yard, special order, or buying Poplar, oak etc from Home Depot you are paying way too much. I buy all of my lumber 100+BF at a time from Steve Wall Lumber in N Carolina www.walllumber.com (http://www.walllumber.com) . I pay about a third of what it costs to buy locally. I also get it straight line ripped on one edge. Here is an order of Poplar for general use, and Aromatic cedar and black walnut for a hope chest. ;)

Wayne Cannon
02-05-2008, 3:44 AM
I recommend reading Christopher Schwartz' new book on workbench design --"Workbenches from Design & Theory to Construction and Use".

He focuses on what aspects/features contribute to, and detract from, making workbenches "work". After reading all of the "survey" books by Landis, Schleining, etc., I had a pretty good idea what I wanted to build. Schwartz changed my thinking significantly. He has well-researched historical and modern bench designs and presents plans for two significantly different benches that "work". He is not fond of several aspects of the popular Scandanavian/Continental bench designs that detract from their usefulness, and explains why very lucidly.

Best of all, he provides good information to help you evaluate various bench features based on the type of work you expect to do on the bench.

--Wayne

Greg Hines, MD
02-13-2008, 11:09 PM
I built the "24 hour Workbench" from Popular Woodworking, and while I only have one vise on it right now, the right hand end is empty for the twin screw that I plan to put there.

Doc

Mike Steinhilper
02-14-2008, 9:48 AM
If you are pricing/purchasing your material from the local lumber yard, special order, or buying Poplar, oak etc from Home Depot you are paying way too much. I buy all of my lumber 100+BF at a time from Steve Wall Lumber in N Carolina www.walllumber.com (http://www.walllumber.com) . I pay about a third of what it costs to buy locally. I also get it straight line ripped on one edge. Here is an order of Poplar for general use, and Aromatic cedar and black walnut for a hope chest. ;)


Peter, what kind of order is that? Are those the "log run" orders they mention on their website? I don't usually like to buy without seeing it, but they seem pretty reliable.

Peter M. Spirito
02-14-2008, 6:51 PM
This is not log run. I buy the select grade and have it surfaced 2 sides and with 1 straight edge. The lengths are random from 8 to 12 feet. There is a little distortion in the photo. Neither the shelf or the wood is sagging. Properly stacked like it is it stays flat and does not warp. ;)

Keith Beck
02-15-2008, 12:06 AM
Peter,

Just wanted to let you know that your shop is way too clean and organized! :D

Keith

Peter M. Spirito
02-15-2008, 8:45 PM
Thanks, learned it from my Dad. Note in photo: eye protection, hearing protection, dust collection. ;)

Jim O'Dell
02-17-2008, 12:20 PM
So, if the project doesn't turn out the way you want it, do you shoot it?? :eek: Maybe thats there to discourage people from coming in and asking to borrow your tools? :D:D:D:D:D Nice set up. Jim.

Bart Leetch
02-17-2008, 12:47 PM
Thanks, learned it from my Dad. Note in photo: eye protection, hearing protection, dust collection. ;)

looks like a well protected shop too.

Peter M. Spirito
02-17-2008, 7:31 PM
(About the rifle: Homeland security starts in the home.) Here is a photo I took today after glueing up some framework for my model railroad. I always cover the work bench with freezer paper when doing glue-ups or finishing to keep the bench clean. It also facilitates during glue-ups because I can clamp directly to the work bench without any sticking to the bench. ;)

Greg Hines, MD
02-19-2008, 10:57 PM
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=31127&cat=1,41637,41645

I like these, pricier, but quite nice and fully removable...more traditional.



I agree with using round bench dogs. I have a pair of them and greatly prefer them to fixed stops. And, when you add a pair of Wonder Dogs, you can almost eliminate the tail vise for holding panels for routing or planing.

Doc