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View Full Version : Some of the oldest and simplest tools get the job done!



Ken Fitzgerald
01-11-2007, 5:03 PM
The LOML is known as the Camera Queen. She's got a good 35mm, an APS and a digital camera and a good Sony camcorder.....She wanted a good fireproof safe for all of her negatives and some family photographs taken in the early 1900s of which she has the only originals. Tuesday night she took me to Costco to show me what she'd found. While there she noticed only one was left....the others had been sold since Saturday.....We'd driven the van over...it was close to closing time and my F-350 was at home....so we bought it and a young guy and I loaded the 235 lb. monstrosity into the back of the van.

Yesterday I needed it out of the van and into the house and down into the basement. I called around....all the neighbors were out.....So...I backed the van into the carport......opened the back door and tipped the 235 lb. safe out onto the concrete floor. I tipped it up and placed my handtruck under it and rolled it over to the steps at our back door. I took a piece of rope and tied it around the box.....tooked the other end of the rope and tied a knotted double loop around a rafter of the carport roof above the back porch. Using a come-along...I raised the safe up onto the back porch. I place the hand truck under it and rolled it into the kitchen. Last night when my oldest son got off work, we tied the rope around it ....he stood at the top of the stairs....insuring that if the top of the box tried to tip towards me..it wouldn't......I very carefully walked it down the stairs...tipping it from one tread to the next....once it was at the bottom of the stairs....we slid it into position and removed it from it's package......Not once did anyone try to lift the thing......235 lbs...........Some of the best tools are the old ones.....still some of the best!

Barry Stratton
01-11-2007, 5:32 PM
Yep, the best tool is the soft gray one between your ears!

Although I'd have thought an old elk hunter such as yourself would of just tossed it over his shoulder and carted it downstairs!

Ken Fitzgerald
01-11-2007, 5:56 PM
Yep, the best tool is the soft gray one between your ears!

Although I'd have thought an old elk hunter such as yourself would of just tossed it over his shoulder and carted it downstairs!

The key word in your statement is in bold now.......:D

Dave Fifield
01-11-2007, 8:29 PM
Good going Ken! I call that tool "gumption"!

BTW, I have a job for you - I need to move a 1947 Hammond BV organ upstairs from my lounge to my music studio. Thing weighs a ton! When can you come on over? :D

Jim Becker
01-11-2007, 10:19 PM
The Hammond BV sounds fun. They built them with "real" materials back then. I'm jealous!

On topic, I've been thinking a lot about how I'm going to get a 1600 lb machine off of a pallet in the near future. It's likely that the "old ways" will prevail there, too, if the trucking company cannot or will not "boom" it off the pallet and put it directly on the trailer. Creative use of boards and a simple pallet jack will have to do the job...

I'm also reminded of the video that someone recently posted where the fellow moved concrete blocks weighing tons with just his hands and some creative leverage.

Ken Fitzgerald
01-11-2007, 10:30 PM
Good going Ken! I call that tool "gumption"!

BTW, I have a job for you - I need to move a 1947 Hammond BV organ upstairs from my lounge to my music studio. Thing weighs a ton! When can you come on over? :D

Dave.....Just where is California?........:rolleyes:

Charles McKinley
01-13-2007, 11:18 PM
An appliance dolly is a really good investment ~$100. The problem is when other people know you have it they want to borrow you and it to help move stuff. The stair roller on them is just the ticket for getting stuff up and down with out the thump thump thump of a traditional dolly. The built in strap is nice too.

I'm glad you got it in place without being hurt. interesting no one was home when you called. Hmmmmm?

Bob Rufener
01-15-2007, 7:47 PM
I had a laminectomy when I was 40-ruptured disc repair. Two weeks after the surgery, I asked the surgeon what my limitations were. His comment was-no bending, no lifting, no twisting. After repeatedly asking him and him giving me the same comment, I said straight out that I have to do some bending, lifting and twisting to just do daily necessary things. His final comment was to use your head instead of your back. Enuf said. I don't always remember what he said and do some stupid things but I try to follow his advice and it has worked well.

Ken Fitzgerald
01-15-2007, 8:21 PM
Bob.....In 2000 I broke my back. I'm 8mm shorter than I used to be. Earlier in 2000 I herniated a disc at L5-S1.....it's still partially herniated. You can bet....I'm extremely careful with my back. It's a fine line between ....doing enough to keep your back strong.....using it within it's limits and not crossing that line thats too much for it! Believe me....I try not to over do it with my back! The next time I might not be so lucky!